Owana Wilcox Belliveau tries to break the will of Princess Pauahi, 1918.

FIGHTING OVER THE ESTATE OF PAUAHI

Honolulu, Dec. 29—Perhaps because the desire of Mrs. Owana Wilcox Belliveau for the estate of Queen Liliuokalani was not fulfilled, she is now trying to fight for the estate of  the Chiefess Pauahi, and is looking for a way to break the Will because of her relationship with Chiefess Pauahi. Why does she keep trying to start this kind of thing? Continue reading

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Founder’s Day, 1894.

IT IS FOUNDER’S DAY.

FORMAL OPENING OF GIRLS’ SCHOOL AND THE MUSEUM ANNEX.

Exercises In Bishop Hall—Addresses By Col. W. F. Allen, Mrs. Haalelea, Miss Pope.

This is Kamehameha School Founder’s Day. It is the anniversary of the birth of that noble woman, Bernice Pauahi Bishop. This Hawaiian calendar feature was marked by the formal opening of the Kamehameha School for Girls and the Chas. R. Bishop Museum Annex.

The exercises began at 2 o’clock this afternoon. With the literary program, the sports and viewing the new school and the Annex, to say nothing of the manual training department, there were visitors on the grounds till after 3 o’clock. Continue reading

E o, e ka wahine hele la o Kaiona! 1894.

Day of Remembrance for the Chiefess Pauahi.

This past Wednesday was a grand day indeed on the campus of the Kamehameha Schools, as usual. In the early morning the students went together upon large buses, as banners waved and the instruments of their band sounded, along with flowers and greenery, they maneuvered the roads headed to the Royal mausoleum in the uplands of Maunaala. Continue reading

Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.

Our Museum, continued, 1900.

OUR MUSEUM

The Bishop Collection of Curios.

One of the Most Interesting Sights In Honolulu Pleasantly Described.

(Concluded.)

Death seems to have played an important part in the ancient regime, as the kings and chiefs had the power of life and death over their subjects. Then too, the priesthood, or kahunas, exercised what is termed the “tabu,” which prescribed certain rules and regulations for the natives, any violation of which was punishable by death; for instance a chief placed “tabu” sticks at the entrance to his hut; that meant to one and all, “Do not enter or pass within the shadow of the tabu sticks under pain of death;” if a Hawaiian subject, and even a petty chief, violated this tabu, he was instantly put to death; supplication was of no avail. The power of the kahunas in their exercise of the tabu, was so great and the superstitious awe of the common native so intense, that its effects have not died out even in this day and age. The common natives are yet prone to believe in their kahunas, and believe that they have the power to pray them to death; in olden days, if an enemy obtained any part of the body of another, a hair, a part of the finger nail, spittle, or anything of the body itself, he would give it to a kahuna and ask him to pray the other one to death; with great ceremony the kahuna would perform certain mysterious functions over the hair, say strange words, offer it before the poison god, and then announce that he was praying the native to death; this being told to the native so great his superstitious fear, he would go to his hut and in reality become sick over the thought of the dread summons made by the kahuna, and in many cases they actually died of the fright thus given them; and to this day many of the natives place more faith in their kahunas than in the “haole” or foreign physicians. If the praying did not perform the evil work, then a piece of the poison god was steeped and the fluid given the sufferer, it is said, which, acting upon his heart, killed him. On every hand in the museum are the evidences of kahunaism and death. There are stones, peculiarly shaped, (like a gourd,) with a small neck; these stones were suspended from the low door of a grass house in such a way that the person entering after the trap was set, would probably be crushed by the fall of the stone. They are made from lava rock. Continue reading