Hanaiakamalama rules, 1916.

RULES REGARDING HOME OF QUEEN EMMA PASSED BY HAWAII DAUGHTERS

Rules and regulations bearing on Hanaiakamalama, the Nuuanu home of the late Queen Emma, were adopted at a meeting on Wednesday of the Daughters of Hawaii, which society now has charge of the home. The rules are as follows:

“1. The object of Hanaiakamalama is to preserve articles formerly owned by the late Queen Emma and such other articles of historic interest as may be give the Daughters of Hawaii for safe keeping.

“2. The building shall be open to visitors daily from 9 to 12 in the morning and from 2 to 4 in the afternoon, excepting Sunday and other days that may be designated.

“3. The house can only be used as a meeting place for the Daughters of Hawaii and cannot be engaged for any other purpose.

“4. A fee of 25 cents will be charged all visitors, members excepted.

“5. Visitors are requested not to handle or deface any article in the building.”

(Star-Bulletin, 10/19/1916, p. 3)

RULES REGARDING HOME OF QUEEN EMMA PASSED BY HAWAII DAUGHTERS

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXIV, Number 7651, Page 3. October 19, 1916.

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Samuel K. Kekoowai on the Daughters of Hawaii and Hanaiakamalama, 1923.

HANAIAKAMALAMA

This is a building near the end of the route of the electric car, and it stands on a hill.

As a result of the graciousness of one of the members of the Daughters of Hawaii [Ahahui o na Kaikamahine o Hawaii], this writer [Samuel K. Kekoowai] was introduced to Mrs. J. Swanzy, the leader of this association, and by her kindness I was welcomed to see the walls of that house which is filled with beautiful decorations of the monarchy, and their images hanging from the walls, set up almost like the museum of Kamehameha [Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum].

This group, the Daughters of Hawaii, upholds the name of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani, and her birthday is cherished by them, and the writer observed the commemoration held by the association which holds dear the name placed upon them, the Daughters of Hawaii.

In the story told to me within the house, Kaleleonalani was raised by her hanai guardian [kahu hanai], Dr. Rooke [Kauka Luka], until she married Liholiho Kamehameha 4, however, there is another version that I have been told by another.

On that 20th day of this June, I saw the back room totally filled with those who came, from the members to visitors, and most were whites and there were a few Hawaiians [??? a o-a na Hawaii].

The story of the circuit of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani around Oahu nei was told, beginning at Waimanalo at the place of John Cummins [Keoni Kamaki], and to Kaneohe at the place of Wainui Pii, and then on to Waikane at the place of Kameaaloha; at Kahana there was a Chinese named Apakana, on to Punaluu there was Naili, to Laie at the place of Kupau, to Kahuku at the place of Kaluhi, to Waialua at the place of Kaiaikawaha. Continue reading

Traditional place names and the Daughters of Hawaii, 1918.

OLD HAWAIIAN NAMES TO BE PRESERVED.

This past Wednesday the Daughters of Hawaii [Ahahui o na Kaikamahine] held a meeting at the home of Queen Emma in the uplands of Nuuanu, known by all by the name Hanaiakamalama, the old home of Kamehameha IV and his queen; and at that meeting it was decided that the calling of many places in Honolulu nei by their Hawaiian names will be preserved forever.

To carry out this endeavor, the organization decided to continue calling the name “Leahi,” and not Diamond Head, as it is being called now, and so too with other names that have been changed; they will be returned to their old names that Hawaiians are familiar with.

At that meeting several things were read pertaining to the life of Queen Liliuokalani  by Mrs. Lahilahi Web, a speech by A. F. Knudsen, and Representative Kuhio, along with the singing of some old mele, just as if they were recreating memories of familiar deeds from the time of Queen Emma in that home.

For the treasury of the Red Cross, Mr. A. F. Knudsen will give a speech specifically pertaining to Hawaii nei of the olden days, at Memorial Hall of the Hawaiian Evangelical Association [Papa Hawaii], at eight o’clock on the evening of this Saturday, May 4, under the direction of the Daughters of Hawaii nei.

The entrance will be half price to go and listen to the speech and for all activities that will be put on, and being that it is a benefit for the Red Cross, and that it is beneficial to listen to this history pertaining to the Hawaiian lahui, all the people should go to hear his speech so that the new generations can get some education.

Mr. Knudsen was born on Kauai and went around amongst the Hawaiian children, and met the old people, and listened to the old stories of Hawaii nei; and because of this, the stories he tells that night will be something totally new for Hawaiians of today, the people who know hardly any of the stories of their lahui and their land.

(Kuokoa, 5/3/1918, p. 4)

E MALAMAIA NA INOA HAWAII KAHIKO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 18, Aoao 4. Mei 3, 1918.

Daughters of Hawaii to Put on Historical Play, 1913.

DAUGHTERS OF HAWAII TO GIVE UNIQUE PROGRAM

The Daughters of Hawaii, an Hawaiian historical society, whose object is to preserve secrets handed down from one generation to another, and whose members are composed of descendents of noted warriors from Alapai nui and Kalaniopuu, kings of Hawaii; Kahekili, king of Maui; Peleioholani and Kahahana, kings of Oahu; Kaeokulani and Kaneoneo, kings of Kauai; Keliiaa of Lanai and Kumukoa of Molokai up to the time of Kamehameha the Conqueror, will give an interesting and purely Hawaiian performance at the opera house on the evening of February 22, as a feature of the Mid-Pacific carnival, the performance forming a portion of the carnival committee’s program.

The performance will deal in tableaux showing famous historical incidents wherein kings and queens, chiefs, chiefesses, warriors and commoners, are shown. These tableaux are faithfully given as to costumes, customs and the beautiful feather cloaks and helmets which formed the regalia of the early rulers, will be seen.

The officers of this society are Mrs. Manuel Reis, president (Keohookalani); Mrs. Haka Iaukea, vice-president (Papakaniau); Mrs. C. M. Blaisdell, secretary and manager (Puea-a-Makakanalii); Mrs. Frank Aki, assistant manager (Kaiakauilani); Miss Pinao, music (kanikapila); Mrs. Pauahi [? Mrs. Puahi], hula.

The members of the society are Keahioka Lua, Kamaeokalani, Kailinaoa, Kailipalaki, Lilinoe, Mrs. Kekumano, Peleioholani, Mrs. Kahalelehua Notley, Mrs. Almira Johnson, Mrs. Lilikalani, Mrs. Paalaa Hook, Mrs. David Maikai, Mrs. Kaikainaalii Munsey, Mrs. Koahou, Mrs. Lydia Kaloio, Mrs. Charles Akau.

Honorary members, Lot Kamehameha, S. L. Peleioholani, Ab. Kaleikau [Abraham Kaleikau], E. K. Lilikalani, Koahau Keliiaa, Naihe Kamakahukilani.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 2/18/1913, p. 5)

DAUGHTERS OF HAWAII TO GIVE UNIQUE PROGRAM

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XX, Number 6514, Page 5. February 18, 1913.

Mrs. J. P. Kahanamoku passes on, 1936.

MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU SETS THIS LIFE ASIDE

SHE WAS A MOTHER GREATLY BELOVED BY ALL

Mrs. Julia Paoa Kahanamoku left this life at 69 years old, and she is the mother of Sheriff Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. At 9 o’clock or so in the morning of this past Thursday, June 4, she left this life behind, at her residence at 1847 Ala Moana Road, after going into a decline through weakness for a long time. Her husband preceded her in death many years ago, Captain Duke H. Kahanamoku.

She was born here on Oahu, and she spent most of her life in Waikiki. She descended from the lines of the I and Mahi of Hawaii, …

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 1)

WAIHO MAI O MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1936.

…from ancient times, and her birth father, Mr. Hoolae Paoa, was one of the people who oversaw many ahupuaa during the monarchy. She was a full Hawaiian by birth, as well as was her husband.

During her healthy days, she participated in many promotional activities in this land. During the years of the great world war [WWI], she put herself out doing all the work of the Red Cross [Ahahui Ke’a Ulaula] in Honolulu;* she was a member of the Kapiolani Maternity Association, Daugthers of Hawaii, and a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu].

Mrs. Kahanamoku had six sons, boys who each went off to find his own fortune, boys who participated greatly in promotional activities as well as body-strengthening events in this land. She has two girls who are living, and one who passed some year ago; the ones living are Bernice and Kapiolani, and the third who died was Maria.

Her ashes were buried at the cemetery in Nuuanu.

This Newspaper joins in on the grieving with this family of children who are bereft of their parents, as well as the rest of the family; and we humbly beseech that the sad thoughts of this family of children and all of the ohana as well be lightened.

*It is no surprise that Duke himself was knitting warm clothes for the Red Cross!

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 4)

...au kahiko, a o kona luaui makuakane...

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1836.

More on Kamehameha III 100th birthday memorial, 1914.

CENTENARY OF KAMEHAMEHA III IS MARKED WITH IMPRESSIVE SERVICE

Handsome Tablet Is Unveiled Accompanied by Sacred Chant of Loved King

The unveiling of a handsome tablet of Hawaiian lava granite, to the accompaniment of sacred chants composed a century ago, marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kauikeaouli, the third of the Kamehamehas, which yesterday afternoon was observed at old Kawaiahao church by the Daughters of Hawaii. It was a fitting memorial to that ruler who, known to his subjects as the beneficent king, gave to the inhabitants of these islands their first written constitution, and, to make the observance further complete, the tablet will be taken to Keauhou, Kona, where it will mark the birthplace of ka moi lokomaikai.

The historical structure of Kawaiahao, around which is woven innumerable tales dear to the heart of the kamaaina, was occupied by more than 2600 persons, the majority of whom were Hawaiian. The memorial tablet occupied the center of the platform, hidden from view by the royal standard of Liliuokalani and High Chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt, both lineal descendants of the Hawaiian King who was the founder of the Kamehameha dynasty. Feathered cloaks of almost priceless value draped the chairs in which they sat.

The strange, yet beautiful, setting doubtless was a perfect replica of a court scene in the days of the old regime when the Kamehameha held sway. The costuming of the participants was perfect, and there was presented a spectacle in which was brought out many ancient and rare relics which today are treasured by Honolulu families and which are seldom seen other than in private homes, where they are held almost sacred.

Attired in feather cloaks and helmets, High Chief Fred Kahapula Beckley and High Chief Albert Kalaninoanoa Hoapili, the spear and kahili bearers respectively, occupied places just back of the queen and High Chiefess Pratt, representing the figures which are seen on the royal Hawaiian coat-of-arms. Both are lineal descendants of chiefs of the court of Kamehameha I, High Chief Beckley being a descendant of Kameeiamoku, and High Chief Hoapili a descendant of Kamanawa, the royal kahili bearer. Boys from the Kamehameha school, to the number of 16, acted as court attendants and kahili bearers, and occupied places on either side of the court representatives. They were attired in feather capes and other accessories adopted by the Hawaiian warriors of other days. Above this gathering was suspended the royal standard of Kalakaua, as well as other Hawaiian flags, their colors blending in perfect harmony with the vivid green of the palms and ferns with which the nave was banked.

Continue reading

Public invitation to celebration of Centenary of Kauikeaouli, 1914.

Centenary of Kauikeaouli

Kamehameha III.

Kawaiahao Church, Tuesday, March 17,

at 4 p. m.

Under the auspices of

The Daughters of Hawaii

HER MAJESTY QUEEN LILIUOKALANI

and

HIGH CHIEFESS ELIZABETH KEKAANIAU PRATT

will assist in the unveiling of the tablet to the memory of

KA MOI LOKOMAIKAI

(The Beneficent King.)

A cordial invitation is extended to the public to be present at this celebration.

(Star Bulletin, 3/11/1914, p. 8)

Centenary of Kauikeaouli

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXI, Number 6840, Page 8. March 11, 1914.