Daughters of Hawaii to Put on Historical Play, 1913.

DAUGHTERS OF HAWAII TO GIVE UNIQUE PROGRAM

The Daughters of Hawaii, an Hawaiian historical society, whose object is to preserve secrets handed down from one generation to another, and whose members are composed of descendents of noted warriors from Alapai nui and Kalaniopuu, kings of Hawaii; Kahekili, king of Maui; Peleioholani and Kahahana, kings of Oahu; Kaeokulani and Kaneoneo, kings of Kauai; Keliiaa of Lanai and Kumukoa of Molokai up to the time of Kamehameha the Conqueror, will give an interesting and purely Hawaiian performance at the opera house on the evening of February 22, as a feature of the Mid-Pacific carnival, the performance forming a portion of the carnival committee’s program.

The performance will deal in tableaux showing famous historical incidents wherein kings and queens, chiefs, chiefesses, warriors and commoners, are shown. These tableaux are faithfully given as to costumes, customs and the beautiful feather cloaks and helmets which formed the regalia of the early rulers, will be seen.

The officers of this society are Mrs. Manuel Reis, president (Keohookalani); Mrs. Haka Iaukea, vice-president (Papakaniau); Mrs. C. M. Blaisdell, secretary and manager (Puea-a-Makakanalii); Mrs. Frank Aki, assistant manager (Kaiakauilani); Miss Pinao, music (kanikapila); Mrs. Pauahi [? Mrs. Puahi], hula.

The members of the society are Keahioka Lua, Kamaeokalani, Kailinaoa, Kailipalaki, Lilinoe, Mrs. Kekumano, Peleioholani, Mrs. Kahalelehua Notley, Mrs. Almira Johnson, Mrs. Lilikalani, Mrs. Paalaa Hook, Mrs. David Maikai, Mrs. Kaikainaalii Munsey, Mrs. Koahou, Mrs. Lydia Kaloio, Mrs. Charles Akau.

Honorary members, Lot Kamehameha, S. L. Peleioholani, Ab. Kaleikau [Abraham Kaleikau], E. K. Lilikalani, Koahau Keliiaa, Naihe Kamakahukilani.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 2/18/1913, p. 5)

DAUGHTERS OF HAWAII TO GIVE UNIQUE PROGRAM

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XX, Number 6514, Page 5. February 18, 1913.

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Even more local news from a hundred years ago, 1915.

Local News

On the coming 13th in the month of March, an election for county seats will be held, outside of the City and County of Honolulu.

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On the Sierra of this past Monday, Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Taylor returned to this city after spending a year or so in San Francisco.

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The Young People’s League [Ahahui o ka Poe Opiopio] is planning to put on once more a grand concert in the Opera House [Hale Mele Hou], sometime during the coming month.

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Currently being planned is a special excursion for Honolulu’s people aboard the Kilauea to Kauai next month, this coming February.

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From what is being heard, there is much criticism by the people over the appointing of R. W. Aylett as head of the garbage system, for he has a job in the band [Royal Hawaiian Band].

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More on the Boston, 1893.

[Excerpt from the article: “OVERTHROW IN HAWAII NEI: The Queen Attempts to Push a New Constitution”]

At perhaps 5 oʻclock in the afternoon, the American warship Boston [Bosetona] landed its officers and sailors who were armed. When they came ashore, the marines were split up to go and guard the residence of the American Minister Stevens on Nuuanu Avenue, and the American Consulate on Merchant Street, and the sailors were sent to King Street and stood before the residence of J. A. Hopper, and later they were sent to the residence of Mr. J. B. Atherton. They stayed there for some time, and then all came back and slept in Arion Hall [Ariona Holo] makai of the Opera House. They are still on shore to the present.

(Kuokoa, 1/21/1893, p. 2)

I ka hora 5 paha o ke ahiahi...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 3, Aoao 2. Ianuari 21, 1893.

Competing rallies, 1893.

O HAWAIIAN LAHUI!

Today, there is a rally being called by the Missionaries of the Reformist Party [Poai Hoomaemae] and those who favor them, at Manamana, with the intent to bring harm to the Queen for Her aloha she has for the lahui, in Her proclaiming a new Constitution; by ending Her reign and making this nation a republic. Therefore, patriots, those born of this land, stand strong behind this nation; there shall not be a single true Hawaiian who will participate in this gathering, should they be invited. All of you true Hawaiians, let us stand behind our Sovereign and give our lives for the rights of our Queen and peace over the land. Those citizens who love their alii are called to join together to march straight to the rally fronting the Opera House [Hale Mele Hou] at 2 o’clock in the afternoon. With one heart of aloha and breasts side by side all across the land, you descendants of Kamehameha.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/16/1893, p. 2)

E KA LAHUI HAWAII!

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 623, Aoao 2. Ianuari 16, 1893.

Maori in Hawaii, 1912.

A New Zealand Theater Group.

A New Zealand theater troupe under the leadership of Ara, a man from the Maori people who performs astonishing acts, arrived in Honolulu. After they left their own land, they visited the lands of the South: New Guinea, Fiji, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, and then arrived here. They are taking beautiful shots of Hawaii nei, and when they perform, they have some nice scenes of these islands.

They will also show some pictures of New Zealand, the lifestyle of the Maori, the Hot Volcanic Springs, Palorous Jack [Pelorus Jack], that astonishing piloting fish that guides the way before sailboats when they enter into the harbor of Wellington, and for which a law was made protecting its life, as well as some other lovely pictures of New Zealand. One day in March, they will hold their performance at the Hale Mele Hou [Opera House].

(Aloha Aina, 2/17/1912, p. 1)

HE PUALI KEAKA NU KILANI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 7, Aoao 1. Feberuari 17, 1912.

Film of Kalaupapa 4th of July celebration, 1915.

FILM OF MOLOKAI SHOWN.

Before a few invited people, the haole film maker, R. K. Bonine showed views of the celebration of the fourth of July at the land of the patients on Molokai, on the night of this past July 4th.

Superintendent McVeigh was amongst the audience, and was much appreciative of the quality and clarity of these views shot on film; and when he returned to the land of the patients this Tuesday, he took with him the movie to show before the patients.

The movie taken by Mr. Bonine was 800 feet in length, and as he agreed before the patients of Kalaupapa to show the movie he shot before them, therefore, he wanted Molokai’s people to see that movie first before him showing it to Honolulu’s people at the Opera House in the future.

The first scene in the movie is the port of Kalaupapa, with the skiffs of the steamship approaching the harbor; accompanying this first scene is the store of Kalaupapa, with a oxcart pulled by four oxen—this scene shows everyday life at the land of the patients.

The scene following this is the infirmary, which is far away, and some other things; and then it moves to the celebration of this past fourth of July.

In the parade are five police, all the way at the head of the parade, with their uniforms; following behind them are the automobiles and the Chinese carts [kaa bake?], and American flags wave everywhere like the ones decorating those vehicles.

After the parading cars were those pa-u riders with their skirts fluttering in the wind; and after them were the various singing groups all dressed up in their uniforms, the girls of Bishop Home, the boys of Baldwin Home; and following that was the cowboys and the pa-u riders of Kauai.

The entertaining horse races of the day is another good scene, along with some other views of the land of the patients; and when that small crowd saw these scenes, they were full of appreciation for Mr. Bonine, and the patients will certainly not fail to give their thanks for the movie.

(Kuokoa, 8/15/1915, p. 3)

HOIKEIKE IA NA KIIONIONI O MOLOKAI.

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 33, Aoao 3. Augate 13, 1915.

Performance of the great story, “Laieikawai,” 1902.

OPERA HOUSE

SATURDAY EVENING, MAR. 15

The Famous Enjoyable Performance of

“LAIEIKAWAI”

which is being prepared from the Famed story of LAIEIKAWAI, the Woman of the Twilight, the Striking Beauty of Paliuli. It will be Opened by the Hawaii Ponoi Dramatic Club on the Night of the coming 15th of March.

The ladies and gentlemen thespians are Beautiful and Handsome; they know the language; their voices are sweet and pleasant like the singing Kahuli land shells.

The Feather Capes are lovely, as are the Feather helmets, the spears, and the ti-leaf sandals; so exquisite that it will make your insides tremble.

Come on down to see firsthand this mystifying beauty.

Don’t forget this; the tickets for entrance can be obtained at Wall Nichols Co. on King Street. Make haste.

You will enjoy it.

(Kuokoa, 2/28/1902, p. 5)

HALE MELE HOU

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Feberuari 28, 1902.