Kupopolo Heiau, 1905.

An Excursion to Kupopolo Heiau.

A group of haole left this town by train this past Wednesday morning to visit the heiau of Kupopolo which stands near Waimea, Oahu; their names being T. G. Thrum, W. A. Bryan, W. W. Hall, F. C. Smith, E. M. Boyd, Dr. Emerson, S. E. Bishop, and F. S. Dodge.

The intent of this trip was to go see if this heiau could be rebuilt like how it was in the beginning. Continue reading

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The Kupopolo Heiau, 1905.

KUPOPOLO HEIAU

This is one of the remaining old Heiau in Waialua, and a picture of the gentlemen of the Promotion Committee [Komite Hoeueu] who are searching for antiquities of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 8/18/1905, p. 4)

Kuokoa_8_18_1905_4.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 33, Aoao 4. Augate 18, 1905.

The Maori and Hawaiians, 1911.

Hawaiians and Maori Talk to Each Other.

In a letter sent by Ernest Kaai from New Zealand to H. P. Wood of the Hawaiian Promotion Committee [which seems to be a precursor to the visitor’s bureau], he shows the progress of their musical touring of Australia and New Zealand. The Hawaiians could hear the Maori language and the Maori could hear the language of Hawaii.

Kaai said that when they went to some villages, they were hosted by Maori people, where one of them said words of welcome and friendship in their mother tongue. But the Hawaiians understood what was being said.

From the side of the musicians, Mr. Kaai stood and gave [rest of the paragraph unclear].

It was not long ago that [also unclear here, but they seem to be talking about the relationship between Aotearoa and Hawaii].

Everywhere that Kaai and his musical group went, the theaters would be filled with them.

When this letter was written, the number of places that Kaai them performed at was about 21, with them going around Australia and reaching New Zealand[?]

[A great deal of the Hawaiian Language Newspapers are bound into book form, and because they were purposely printed without much empty margins, often the printed portions that fall in the margin area of the books are not legible, especially when scanned. To get a clear image of the entire page, the books will have to be unbound first. That, it seems, takes a great amount of funding.]

(Kuokoa, 6/30/1911, p. 8)

KAMAILIO PU NA HAWAII ME NA MAORI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 26, Aoao 8. Iune 30, 1911.

Mid-Pacific Carnival 1914.

This is the Picture of Duke Kahanamoku Atop a Surfboard, For Advertising Washington’s Day.

MID-PACIFIC CARNIVAL
FEB 18 to 21 1914
DUKE KAHANAMOKU
CHAMPION SWIMMER OF THE WORLD
[Illegible line follows, that does not appear in other images online…]
HONOLULU HAWAII
STEEL–HENDERSON
ENGRAVED AND PRINTED BY HAWAIIAN GAZETTE CO., LTD., HONOLULU.

To advertise the celebration of the birth of Washington, in the coming month of February, the Promotion Committee has chosen the picture of Duke Kahanamoku, the swimming champion of the world, standing atop of his surfboard, as a picture to send all over the world as advertisement to benefit this Territory.

This newspaper company received the contract to create and print some thousands of these illustrations, to be sent all over, and posted at places where crowds assemble; it was finished a month before the date of completion as set in the contract.

This image of Duke Kahanamoku is done in multiple colors, under the direction of the art department of this publishing company.

(Kuokoa, 10/3/1913, p. 5)

O Keia ke Kii o Duke Kahanamoku Maluna o ka Papa Heenalu, i mea Hoikeike no ka la o Wakinekona

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 39, Aoao 5. Okatoba 3, 1913.

Announcement for a Play about Kahekili, 1913.

Kahekili, King of Maui, Lord of the Paelekulani

On Saturday, February 22, at the Opera House (Hale Mele Hou), will be opening a play about the story of King Kahekili of Maui, put on by the “Daughters of Warriors of Hawaii.” [Kaikamahine a na Pukaua]

Also appearing will be the kapu chief, Kalanikauiokikilo and the alii Mahana who carry the kapu Pulikoliko of Kalani Waiakua Waikanakaole (Kalanikauaiokikilo and Kalola) the grandchildren and Kalanimehameha, Ka Na’i Aupuni.

Come and see for yourself. The tickets are now available from the Promotion Committee for $1., .75c., and 50c.

(Kuokoa, 2/14/1913, p. 8)

KAHEKILI, MOI O MAUI, HAKU O KA PAELEKULANI

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 7, Aoao 8. Feberuari 14, 1913.