Picture of Kamaiko Heiau in 1908.

THE HEIAU OF KAMAIKO, NEAR NAPOOPOO, WHERE A. GARTLEY AND C. H. COOKE RECENTLY DISCOVERED THE SKULLS OF PRIEST AND THEIR FOLLOWERS SAID TO HAVE BEEN EXECUTED AT THE HEIAU ABOUT THE TIME THE TABUS WERE ABOLISHED.

(PCA, 3/25/1908, p. 1)

PCA_3_25_1908_1

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVII, Number 7995, Page 1. March 25, 1908.

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Kamaiko Heiau story in the PCA, 1908.

GRIM RELICS OF HUMAN SACRIFICE ARE DISCOVERED

A. Gartley and C. H. Cooke Find Many Skulls and Skeletons at the Kamaiko Heiau in Kona, All in Good Preservation.

A Gartley and C. H. Cooke made a most interesting discovery in connection with the Kamaiko heiau of the district of Keei, in South Kona, on their recent visit to the Big Island. Continue reading

Iwi in Kamaiko Heiau, 1908.

BONES FOUND IN HEIAU

At Keei, Kona, Found were Many Human Skulls and Bones.

Upon the return of Mr. A. Gartley and C. H. Cook from their excursion to South Kona, Hawaii, they said that when they went to look at Kamaiko Heiau at Keei, they found many human bones in the heiau.

It is conjectured that the reason there are many human skulls and their bones there is because their lives were sacrificed in this heiau when the kapu system [ka noho ame ka ai kapu ana] was abolished. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, conclusion, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

RETRIBUTION  IS DEALT KO’IHALA

The ohia log, destined to be carved into a god for the heiau at Makanau, was partially raised up the temple walls with the assistance of the High Chief Ko’ihala.

The priests in charge of the work had persuaded Ko’ihala to exert his mana (spiritual power) by placing his hands upon the log as the men on the upper heiau wall pulled up on the lines attached to the log.

THE LOG STALLS

When the log had been raised to a distance just above the chief’s head, it seemed to be stalled again. The chief had stepped back to survey the work.

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The priest turned to Ko’ihala and urged him to  step under the log and press his hands up against it as the men pulled on the lines.

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Ko’ihala complied with the request.

At a signal from the priest, the men hauled the log up a foot or so and then let it drop on their chief. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part V, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

THE PRIESTS PLOT AGAINST KOIHALA

From being a respected and beloved ruler, Koihala became the most hated when he forced his men to climb Mauna Loa and fetch a great ohia log for the heiau he was building at Makanau.

During the wretched trip up into the forests, the Kau men had eaten fern roots, starvation food ordinarily fed pigs and dogs.

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It was during this trip that the priests in charge took pity upon the Kau men doing this forced labor.

The priests had a foreboding that no good could come of the construction of a heiau under these unhappy circumstances. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part IV, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

THE KAU MEN ARE SENT INTO MOUNTAINS

The Hawaiian people who inhabited the Kau district on the Big Island were accustomed to a dry, hot climate.

The nature of the district led the men to seek their food in the ocean where there was a wealth of fine fish. For that reason, the Kau people loved their fresh fish.

When the high chief Koihala ordered the Kau men to construct the great heiau at Makanau, the men worked cheerfully as long as the food supplies lasted.

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They grumbled continuously while they fetched the little pebbles from Punaluu to pave the inner heiau courtyard. They endured this work, for they believed the end of the project was in sight. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part III, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

THE TRIALS OF HEIAU CONSTRUCTION

Koihala, the high chief of the Kau district who constructed the immense heiau on the heights at Makanau, allowed his ambitions to still his conscience as an alii.

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The high chief who kept the love and devotion of his people made provision for their needs when he called upon the manpower of the district to work upon a public project such as the construction of a heiau.

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The alii who destroyed the regular rhythm of planting and fishing by employing all his men upon a construction job was certain to bring starvation upon his people and trouble for himself.

Koihala was such a chief. Continue reading