It wasn’t only Kaʻū that dispatched oppressive aliʻi, 1865.

[Found under: KA MOOLELO O HAWAII NEI. HELU 14.]

During the period of Lonoikamakahiki, a section went to his older brother, Kanaloakuaana; Kona, Kohala, and Hamakua were ruled by Kanaloakuaana. Kau, Puna, and Hilo were ruled by Lonoikamakahiki.

There were many chiefs of Hawaii [island] who were warring, and there were many alii that were killed by the makaainana for their tyranny and for plundering the belongings of the makaainana. Continue reading

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Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, conclusion, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

RETRIBUTION  IS DEALT KO’IHALA

The ohia log, destined to be carved into a god for the heiau at Makanau, was partially raised up the temple walls with the assistance of the High Chief Ko’ihala.

The priests in charge of the work had persuaded Ko’ihala to exert his mana (spiritual power) by placing his hands upon the log as the men on the upper heiau wall pulled up on the lines attached to the log.

THE LOG STALLS

When the log had been raised to a distance just above the chief’s head, it seemed to be stalled again. The chief had stepped back to survey the work.

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The priest turned to Ko’ihala and urged him to  step under the log and press his hands up against it as the men pulled on the lines.

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Ko’ihala complied with the request.

At a signal from the priest, the men hauled the log up a foot or so and then let it drop on their chief. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part V, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

THE PRIESTS PLOT AGAINST KOIHALA

From being a respected and beloved ruler, Koihala became the most hated when he forced his men to climb Mauna Loa and fetch a great ohia log for the heiau he was building at Makanau.

During the wretched trip up into the forests, the Kau men had eaten fern roots, starvation food ordinarily fed pigs and dogs.

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It was during this trip that the priests in charge took pity upon the Kau men doing this forced labor.

The priests had a foreboding that no good could come of the construction of a heiau under these unhappy circumstances. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part II, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

KOIHALA ORDERS POHAKU HANAU PAVING

The construction of Koihala’s heiau (temple) on top of the hill at Makanau in the Kau district progressed very well at first.

Food supplies were sufficient to sustain the men at the first heavy labor of quarrying the great rocks needed to build the heiau walls and to haul them to the site.

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It was a tremendous undertaking, for Koihala wished his heiau to be the biggest and best in the Kau district.

Once the great walls were in place, Koihala issued an order which brought the first grumblings. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor retells Kawena Pukui’s Koihala story, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

KOIHALA, A CHIEF OF GREAT AMBITION

This is an ancient and true story of a chief of old Hawaii whose overweening ambition was the cause of his downfall.

It is one of the many stories of the people of the district of Kau on the Big Island told by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui of the Bishop museum staff. Continue reading

Paaiea Pond, part 4 and final, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Meeting with Kolomu’o and Pahinahina.

When the flames subsided, the fire disappeared, and this is why it was assumed it was the fire of the Uau Bird Catchers in the Mountains.

In the middle of that night, the lava emerged and flowed like water below a crater on the side of a peak called Kileo, and it is black, shiny pahoehoe that remains there to this day. And from there the lava dove down and resurfaced makai side and several deep fissures cracked open and remain near the village that Mr. Maguire lives at.

The lava dropped down again and on the makai side of the old road there opened up a small furrow six (6) feet wide, and from here the lava began to flow and overran everything before it.

Villages were destroyed and some people died as victims to the wrath of the Goddess of the crater, because of the denial of Pele by that Konohiki [Kepaalani] which the Alii [Kamehameha I] stationed to oversee all of his wealth. And when the Konohiki saw the lava burning everything and turning into pahoehoe and gorging away, he finally realized that the old lady was Pele that appeared before him asking for fish, palu, and then shrimp, and he regretted this filled with dread and great fear. Continue reading

Paaiea Pond, part 3, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Meeting with Kolomu’o and Pahinahina.

When the woman left that place at the seaside of Kaelehuluhulu, she arrived in the uplands of Keoneeli, a place that is renown to this day called Kepuhiapele [‘the scorching of Pele’], a heap of aa lava that is almost 200 Feet high, downside of the place where J. A. MaGuire [known also as Keoni Kaimana] is living.

When the woman arrived there, there were two girls named Kolomu’o and Pahinahina broiling breadfruit, while the parents were away farming. This was a huge town during those days, with many people living there. When the woman met up with the girls broiling ulu. The woman said, “The ulu that you are cooking is done.” One of the girls responded, “We are cooking ulu, but it is not totally done.”

The woman went on, “When you ulu is cooked, who will partake of it first?” “La’i, my god, will eat first.” “So La’i is a powerful akua?” “Yes, La’i is powerful.” The name of this girl was Kolomu’o, and the area beneath that scorching of Pele is famous to this day and called Kolomu’o, and famous too is the Opelu fishing shrine [Ko’a] at the beach of Kaupulehu.

Then the woman asked the other girl, Pahinahina, “And when your ulu is done, who is it for?” “It is for Pele Honuamea, my god.” “Then it is our ulu; your ulu is cooked, let the two of us partake in it.” Pahinahina agreed, and the ulu was peeled [makikoe²] and eaten up. Continue reading