Paaiea Pond, part 4 and final, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Meeting with Kolomu’o and Pahinahina.

When the flames subsided, the fire disappeared, and this is why it was assumed it was the fire of the Uau Bird Catchers in the Mountains.

In the middle of that night, the lava emerged and flowed like water below a crater on the side of a peak called Kileo, and it is black, shiny pahoehoe that remains there to this day. And from there the lava dove down and resurfaced makai side and several deep fissures cracked open and remain near the village that Mr. Maguire lives at.

The lava dropped down again and on the makai side of the old road there opened up a small furrow six (6) feet wide, and from here the lava began to flow and overran everything before it.

Villages were destroyed and some people died as victims to the wrath of the Goddess of the crater, because of the denial of Pele by that Konohiki [Kepaalani] which the Alii [Kamehameha I] stationed to oversee all of his wealth. And when the Konohiki saw the lava burning everything and turning into pahoehoe and gorging away, he finally realized that the old lady was Pele that appeared before him asking for fish, palu, and then shrimp, and he regretted this filled with dread and great fear. Continue reading

A Touching letter from Diamond Kekona, in far away Britain, to his father in Hawaii, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN

Dear Papa:–Here are some words for you; my wife and I are healthy, and we are believing that you and the family are doing likewise. My dear wife is completely cured of her sickness, after I put great efforts into finding a cure–partly as a result of the doctors and partly because of the Lord Jesus Christ–as I prayed all the time to the Lord to give health to my wife, as you instructed me earlier.

She was sick for 12 weeks from the time she gave birth, and because of God’s love she regained her health. I take her walking around every day for 2 hours, and she is beginning to eat and regain her weight.

Father, I have joined the armed forces, as I told you earlier. The doctor gave his permission, and I received my papers, to the regiment #30, of married men, under the command of Lord Derby. I wear the symbol of my regiment on my left arm, just as other soldiers do in the army of Britain. I will receive my orders in June or July to proceed to the battlefield without delay for the honor of the Hawaiian people and for the flag of the homeland of my beloved wife.

We will send you a picture on the next boat, and when I receive my uniform, I will send you a picture, and that will be my last picture for who knows how long, but I find my relief in God. Tell August Kekona, don’t come to this land; there are no jobs, no money, there is lack in daily needs; tell him to go to America because it is a land where you can make it, where you can make money and get other things to make you happy. I say this because I was there for many years. Tell him my advice. I am thinking this is enough writing for the time being. Papa, give my love to Kuku Makalohi and uncle, Mrs. Lonohiwa, Bro. August and Hugo Kekona, and the rest of my love, to you my Papa. You son,

DIAMOND KEKONA,
87 Blackwell St., Kidderminster, England.

Aloha Papa:–Here are some thoughts to you, those being these: I am doing well, I am over my sickness, because of the tireless efforts of my loving Daimana for me.

Papa, tell August Kekona, don’t leave Hawaii. If he listens to my advice, he will be happy; he should live in Honolulu with you. There is no work for men here; women work, and take care of their husbands. Women are more than half of the workforce here in Britain now. Also, the pay here is very low. Papa, you are probably puzzled that my Daimana has joined the 30th regiment of married men, under the command of Lord Derby. I believe that this war is one of the worst; I am very afraid. There will be many more casualties of the men joining this war–both from the Allied side and the German side, before the war is over.

Daimana and I sent our picture to you, but my picture isn’t so good because I have just recovered from my sickness. I will go again later to take a picture and send it to you. I look at my picture and it is as if I am a totally different girl. I think I will end here. I wish you and everyone there the best in this new year. Papa, don’t forget to give my aloha to Mrs. Lawe Lonohiwa (I will write her when I have some time). Give my love to August Kekona. Your daughter,

AMY KEKONA.
78 Blackwell St., Kidderminister, England.

(Kuokoa, 2/18/1916, p. 2)

LETA MAI PELEKANE MAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Feberuari 18, 1916.

Speaking of Hawaiians serving in the military, does anyone remember Diamond Kekona? 1916.

A Son of Hawaii Goes to War for Britain

This picture was sent from Britain giving notice that Diamond Kekona, a Hawaiian, was enlisting in the Military of the homeland of his wife, Britain. He is prepared for when he will be called to service. Those in the picture are Mr. and Mrs. Barker, Mr. and Mrs. Diamond Kekona, and Mr. and Mrs. Smith. One of the women is an older sister of Mrs. Kekona’s. And one of the men is their brother.

[When i was posting to the old Hoolaupai Face Book page, there were many letters sent by Diamond Kekona from England to his father Dick [Richard Kekona] which were posted. If anyone wants to see them reposted here, where they will be easily searchable, i can do that. I will post the first letter i found in the papers right after this as an example.]

(Kuokoa, 3/31/1916, p. 1)

Komo He Keiki Hawaii E Kaua No Pelekane

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 13, Aoao 1. Maraki 31, 1916.