Casualties from exploding lava, 1924.

MET WITH DEATH FROM ROCKS FROM THE THE LAVA

Two Haole Soldiers Disappear Without Being Found—It is Believed They Too Were Victims of the Lava

These are the two haole soldiers who disappeared without their bodies being found from the morning of this past Sunday. The two were last seen in an area near the crater, before the powerful lava explosion.

From the left is Edward J. Hinman, and to his right is Howard J. Simmons, they are both soldiers of the engineers of Leilehua, and they were camping at Kilauea, Hawaii.

As per the very latest news received from Hilo town, Madame Pele is surely at it these days, displaying her wondrous power which causes fear in a great many of Hawaii’s people who went to see the volcanic activity.

Amongst the visitors on this past Sunday was one who met with tragedy, after breaking both his legs and being burned by the hot ash from the lava, that being Truman T. Taylor, the bookkeeper of Pahala Sugar Plantation. Continue reading

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Escaping rocks thrown into the sky, 1924.

The Deeds of Madame Pele, the Woman of the Pit, are Wondrous

Many Lives are Spared
From the Rocks of Lava

Rocks and Ash are Thrown into the Sky When the Lava Exploded This Past Tuesday

HILO, May 13.—Many lives were spared this afternoon, because Thomas E. Boles, the superintendent of Hawaii national park, foresaw the trouble and forbade people from going to see the crater of Halemaumau, just minutes before the powerful explosion of lava, throwing huge rocks to a distance of 2000 feet. Volcanic ash was shot 1800 feet in the sky above the crater. Continue reading

From the eruption 99 years ago, 1919.

NEWS ABOUT THE LAVA IN KONA

According to the news in the Hilo Tribune newspaper from Tom C. White [Toma C. White] of Kainaliu, he reported on what he and some others witnessed of the activity of the lava these days. The lava is spouting with force from the Mauna Loa side, and it is about 7,150 feet from sea level, and the lava is spewing from six places from the side of the mountain, but these craters are joining together into a large caldera, and from this caldera, the lava flowing out into four branches. Continue reading

More on the arrival of Pele, 1862.

[Found under: “HE MOOOLELO NO HIIAKAIKAPOLIOPELE. Helu 9.]

Holo mai Pele mai Kahikina,
A kau ka waa i Mookini,
Noho kaua i Kumalae,
Hooku Pele ma i ke kii,
Noho i ke kii a Pele ma, a ka pua o koi,
Kanaenae Pele ma ilaila,
Kai a huakai mai Pele,
A ka lae i Leleiwi,
Honi i ke ala o ka hala,
O ka lehua o Mokaulele,
Oia ka Pele a kui la,
He kunana hale Puuloa,
He hale moe o Papalauahi,
He halau no Kilauea,
Haule mai Pele mai Kahiki mai,
O ka hekili o ke olai, o ka ua loku,
O ka ua paka, o Haihailaumeaiku, Continue reading

On Pele’s departure from Kahiki, 1906.

[Found under: “He Moolelo no Hiiakaikapoli-o-Pele.]

KAU HELU UMI-KUMAMAKAHI A HIIAKA.

1. Mai Kahiki ka wahine o Pele
2. Mai ka aina i Polapola
3. Mai ka punohu a Kane
4. Mai ke ao lalapa i ka lani
5. Mai ka opu la i Kahiki
6. Lapuka i Hawaii ka wahine o Pele
7. Kalai ka waa o Honuaiakea
8. Ko waa o Kamohoalii
9. Hoa mai ka moku a paa
10. Ua oki ka waa o ke akua
11. Ka waa o Kalaihonuamea
12. Holo mai ke au aeae Pele
13. Aeae ka lani, ai puni ka moku
14. Aeae kini o ke akua
15. Ia wai ka uli, ka hope o ka waa?
16. Ia Kamohoalii
17. Ia Ehu-a-menehune Continue reading

David Alapai and his mele inoa for Pele, 1919.

INTERESTING MATTERS PERTAINING TO THE LAVA SEASIDE OF ALIKA

When lava gushed forth upon the land of Alika, nearby the “building filled with tons of awa.” Sleeping there in that place was a man intoxicated on awa, and it was with great effort that this man drunken on awa escaped with his life. Just as that man got away did the “lava” engulf that building with its tons of awa. Right makai side of that awa storehouse the man had tied up his donkey and it is was seen that the lava had flowed off course and left behind this donkey belonging to that awa storehouse watchman. Several days later when that man was talking about his near escape from the lava, he told this funny story. “Pele does not have interest in Donkey meat, but she likes drinking awa. She waited a bit for me to get away from that building and then she drank all of our awa up, and to show her appreciation for this awa drinking party, she left behind my Donkey.” Continue reading

More on prolific Charles Furneaux, 1881.

Mr. Furneaux’s Paintings.

A very interesting series of oil paintings by Mr. Furneaux is to be seen in the tower room of the Government Building [Aliiolani Hale]. These are chiefly sketches of the volcanic phenomena which have been displayed on Hawaii since November last. Having been on the spot from the beginning of the eruption, and taking a great interest in it, Mr. Furneaux has been able to secure illustrations of all its phases during the progress of the flow, from its source to the immediate proximity of the sea. The first of the series is a view taken from Kawaihae, in November last, after the flow had divided into two or more streams; one the Kau stream, which, after threatening the Kapapala Plantation, has long since ceased to flow; another the flow towards the plateau between Maunaloa and Maunakea, which, after many windings and doublings, is now threatening the town and harbor of Hilo. The next view was taken from Hilo Bay, and shows the three streams which were so conspicuous on the face of the mountain in November last. Immediately after his arrival Mr. Furneaux paid a visit to the crater of eruption, which is situated at an elevation of about 12,000 feet, or about 2,000 feet below the summit of the mountain. Three of the paintings depict this crater, one being from a point which gives a view of its interior. Another picture gives a near view of the blow-hole, or secondary crater, from which a discharge of lava was noticed on December 3rd. The next group of paintings gives us vivid illustrations of the conditions of things near Hilo in April and May last. In the former month Mr. Furneaux obtained a fine view of the main flow, as it appeared in the woods about eight miles from Hilo, at the time when its whole width of two to two and a half miles was in a molten and very active state, just at a point where the Puna, Waiakea and Hilo flows were being separately developed from it. In this picture we have a fine illustration of the “volcano cloud” with its deep red tinge looking more fiery than the very lava whose glow it reflects. The next of the series shows the curious phenomena of a waterspout on the lava flow, a sight frequently witnessed when the front face of the stream was lingering in the woods. Another picture also taken in April at the same distance from Hilo, shows the black and broken surface of the flow of 1856 and this new and greater flow creeping up to and over it. The next series of sketches were of the Waiakea flow taken two months before the sudden outburst by which it has threatened the sugar mill. One is of the artist’s camp in a dense growth of ohias, tree-ferns and wild bananas close to the edge of the flow. Another sketch from the tent door pictures some bananas, ferns and creepers with the red glare from the lava as a background. A third is a daylight view of the flow showing the havoc made in the lovely forest thus cruelly invaded. This sketch was taken when one tall ohia remained still erect with lava all round it. John Hall, whose place has since been destroyed, was Mr. Furneaux’s guide, and the latter made a sketch of his house before its fate was anticipated. This view was taken in May; a companion picture shows everything overwhelmed except a tree and part of the fence, with an extraordinary pit in the foreground, revealing the liquid lava flowing beneath the cooled crust. Later in May Mr. Furneaux paid a visit to what is known as the Hilo flow. Among the group of sketches then taken is one of the advanced part of the flow, with a group of Hawaiians getting specimens in the foreground; a sketch of Hale Laumaia, with the volcanic cloud hanging over the wooded scenery of the background; a sketch of the flow at the moment of one of the gas explosions, which are common when the lava is passing over the surface of previous flows, and penetrating into the caverns which about in the dead lava. Then comes a sketch in which we have a cascade of lava falling over a ledge of bare rock, and by way of contrast to its lurid fire, the flame of burning timber and undergrowth on the right hand of the picture. Following this series is a picture of the Waiakea flow as seen from a distance before its sudden advance; also a sketch of H. H. Ruth Keelikolani’s place, where that flow will probably reach the sea. The last group are from sketches taken late in July, after the Waiakea flow had pushed forward with so much violence. One of John Hall’s property has already been alluded to; another shows the lava flowing over a precipice about 60 feet wide, and 14 or 15 feet high, into a great pool of water—a scene already familiar to us through Mr. Dickson’s photographs; and a third shows the Waiakea mill, and the position of the flow on 25th July, with the intervening land. One interesting picture shows the way in which the lava at times pushes its way forward, throwing out snake-like tongues of fire from the black front of the stream.

Besides these paintings, there are some pictures of Halemaumau, and some views of forest and mountain scenery. Mr. Furneaux has also a number of other pictures, which he has not at present opened out for the public view, as he intends to return at once to Hilo to increase his store of sketches, and to catch, if possible, the lava stream in the very act of precipitating itself into the sea.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 8/13/1881, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXVI, Number 7, Page 3. August 13, 1881.