History of volcanic activities and why the newspapers need to be rescanned as clearly as possible, 1868–for the present, for the future.

[Found under: “Ke Ahi Pele Nui ma Hawaii. NA OLAI KUPINAI. KE KAI HOEE NUI! MAKE WELIWELI MA KAU! Na Palapala a na Makamaka mai Hawaii mai, eia iho malalo:”]

On Thursday at 3 in the afternoon, that being the 2nd of this April, there came a great powerful earthquake, and people could not stand upright, and so too the animals. The soil of the earth spew up into the sky like smoke and hills tumbled down; large trees fell, and some of the valleys were filled, and houses fell; the number of houses which fell numbered 30 or more; and 3 churches fell, the churches of Kahuku and Waiohinu and Punaluu; and there is a large pit at Kahuku that is 80 feet in circumference and 350 feet or more deep, and from within this pit rose steam like the steam of the volcanic crater; the distance from the port of Kaalualu to this pit is 6 miles or so; and there are many other deeds carried out by God. Continue reading

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Just because you find something in the newspaper, that does not necessarily make it true, 1889.

HAWAIIAN IMMUNITIES.

While hurricanes and cyclones howl with destructive fury over most of the oceans and seas of the world, the Hawaiian Islands have a singular immunity from gales of that nature. In March last it was demonstrated that very few portions of the South Pacific are free from periodical disturbances of the elements that culminate in destructive violence. Continue reading

Hurricane, 1892.

Ship Sunk at Sea.

One Skiff Landed at Puna.

One Skiff Lost at Sea.

Hilo, September 26, 1892.

Aloha oe: The three-masted ship W. H. Campbell, captain E. E. Havener, left Port Townsend on the 5th of August, 1892, sailing for Queenstown with 1,400,000 feet of lumber. On the 26th of August, they were caught in a Hurricane [makani ino], from the south east at latitude 14 north, longitude 120 west, and in three hours was filled with water; Continue reading

More on art by Nawahi, 1877.

From the Pen of the Hon. J. Nawahi.

Hilo, May 13.—My Dear Whitney, Aloha—It has not been perhaps twelve hours since we met on May 9, and there has arrived fearful news. That being the Tsunami [Kai Hoee] here in Hilo! Here are drawings [paintings?] done right soon after the flooding by the sea which I enclose. [These three pictures of the tsunami exacting its terrible act can be seen in the window of Whitney’s Book Store, Editor.] Continue reading

The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading