William Panui talks about fishing, 1989.

[Found under: “Storytelling now a respected art”]

William Panui: Fish tales

Pacific Islands: Reef fishing on the Big Island

William Panui was adopted by his grandparents and grew up on land the family owned at remote Keei Beach on the South Kona coast.

His grandfather—Lui Kauanoe Panui—only spoke Hawaiian and taught him the old ways of fishing. “The old techniques depended on what was available,” he said. “Now you can just go to the store and buy everything you need.” Continue reading

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Hui Oiwi o Kamehameha, 1943.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

By CARL THOENE

Alexander Minoaka Thoene has been elected kahuna nui of Hui Oiwi, the Hawaiian club, at the Kamehameha School for Boys. Minoaka, who is a senior, has been a member of the club since 1939. Norman Lunahooponopono Rosehill has been chosen kahuna, and William Kahuelani Stewart is now the club’s kakauolelo. Howard Kalani Benham has been chosen puuku and Edwin Mahiai Beamer has been re-elected alakai himeni. Continue reading

One of the reasons why newspapers fold, 1917.

We are waiting for the payment of some of the subscribers of the Hoku o Hawaii. The well being of the “Laborers” depends upon your keeping in mind the life of the newspaper.

[For as long as there have been newspapers, it seems there have been this sort of reminder to those delinquent in paying for their subscriptions.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/21/1917, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_7_21_1917_2.png

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 12, Helu 4, Aoao 2. Iune 21, 1917.

It wasn’t only Kaʻū that dispatched oppressive aliʻi, 1865.

[Found under: KA MOOLELO O HAWAII NEI. HELU 14.]

During the period of Lonoikamakahiki, a section went to his older brother, Kanaloakuaana; Kona, Kohala, and Hamakua were ruled by Kanaloakuaana. Kau, Puna, and Hilo were ruled by Lonoikamakahiki.

There were many chiefs of Hawaii [island] who were warring, and there were many alii that were killed by the makaainana for their tyranny and for plundering the belongings of the makaainana. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, conclusion, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

RETRIBUTION  IS DEALT KO’IHALA

The ohia log, destined to be carved into a god for the heiau at Makanau, was partially raised up the temple walls with the assistance of the High Chief Ko’ihala.

The priests in charge of the work had persuaded Ko’ihala to exert his mana (spiritual power) by placing his hands upon the log as the men on the upper heiau wall pulled up on the lines attached to the log.

THE LOG STALLS

When the log had been raised to a distance just above the chief’s head, it seemed to be stalled again. The chief had stepped back to survey the work.

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The priest turned to Ko’ihala and urged him to  step under the log and press his hands up against it as the men pulled on the lines.

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Ko’ihala complied with the request.

At a signal from the priest, the men hauled the log up a foot or so and then let it drop on their chief. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part VI, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

KO’IHALA HELPS RAISE THE OHIA LOG

There was an unusual stir and bustle among the men of the Kau district on the day they assembled to lift the great oohia log up over the walls of the new heiau at Makanau upon orders from their chief, Ko’ihala.

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This great log,  hauled with much labor and misery from the forest area on Mauna Loa, was to be carved into the image of Ko’ihala’s protecting god.

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The men assigned to the work were in a very jovial mood. It was the first day they had not grumbled since the early days of the heiau construction. Continue reading