Does anyone know how to make kulolo in bamboo anymore? 1930

[Found under: “KA HUAKAI A KA MOIWAHINE KALELEONALANI NO ENELANI.”

There were tables as well with Hawaiian food: lehua poi, fish from the fishponds, fish from the sea and schooling at Pohukaina, that is Likelike street today. Continue reading

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This sounds like it was the place to be! 1955.

K. Shimogaki

HAWAIIAN CRAFTSMANSHIP—Participating in the YWCA’s Hawaiian afternoon next Saturday will be from left, Mrs. Amelia Guerrero, Mrs. Anne Teves, Mrs. Harriet Burrows and Mrs. Eugenia Logan. The annual event will be held at the Ala Wai club house for the benefit of the World Fellowship committee.

‘YW’ Hawaiian Afternoon Slated For Next Saturday

Hawaiian craft demonstrations and entertainment will be featured at the Young Women’s Christian association’s annual event, A Hawaiian Afternoon, next Saturday. Sponsored for the benefit of the World Fellowship committee, it will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Ala Wai club house. Continue reading

William Panui talks about fishing, 1989.

[Found under: “Storytelling now a respected art”]

William Panui: Fish tales

Pacific Islands: Reef fishing on the Big Island

William Panui was adopted by his grandparents and grew up on land the family owned at remote Keei Beach on the South Kona coast.

His grandfather—Lui Kauanoe Panui—only spoke Hawaiian and taught him the old ways of fishing. “The old techniques depended on what was available,” he said. “Now you can just go to the store and buy everything you need.” Continue reading

More Hokulea past, 1975.

Keaulana: ‘It was beautiful.’

First cruise proves craft a humdinger

By BUNKY BAKUTIS
Advertiser Staff Writer

After the dust had settled from the day’s ceremony and the crew relaxed around beer coolers and luau food, Buffalo Keaulana, one of the two steersmen for the sailing canoe’s maiden voyage, summed up the brief cruise: “It was beautiful.

“It (the canoe) turned real easy. And when the paddling was right and the canoe was moving, it was a breeze to handle,” said Keaulana, who has been practicing sailing a smaller version of the double-hulled canoe this past year in preparation for the Tahiti trip.

SOME OF THE PADDLERS for yesterday’s ceremonial cruise into Kaneohe Bay also sung the craft’s praises. Continue reading

Hokulea! 1975

Photo by Robert B. Goodman for Polynesian Voyaging Society

Not since Kamehameha…

The place is Kaneohe Bay; the date, 1975. But not since the days of Kamehameha has such a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual been seen in Hawaii. The occasion was yesterday’s launching of a double-hulled craft which the Polynesian Voyaging Society will attempt to sail to Tahiti and back next summer. For more pictures and the story, see Hawaii Report on Page A-3.

(Star-Bulletin & Advertiser, 5/9/1975, p. 1)

Star&Advertiser_3_9_1975_1.png

Sunday Star-Bulletin and Advertiser, Page A1, March 9, 1975.

 

Ohelo stories from James K. Kahele Jr., a follow up, 1930.

I just noticed that James K. Kahele Jr. states that there are stories not only saying that ohelo originated in Hawaii nei, but previous to this, he says that there are stories of it coming from afar, from Kahiki.

For the rest of the article speaking of the foreign origin stories, click here.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 8/8/1930, p. 3)