More Hokulea past, 1975.

Keaulana: ‘It was beautiful.’

First cruise proves craft a humdinger

By BUNKY BAKUTIS
Advertiser Staff Writer

After the dust had settled from the day’s ceremony and the crew relaxed around beer coolers and luau food, Buffalo Keaulana, one of the two steersmen for the sailing canoe’s maiden voyage, summed up the brief cruise: “It was beautiful.

“It (the canoe) turned real easy. And when the paddling was right and the canoe was moving, it was a breeze to handle,” said Keaulana, who has been practicing sailing a smaller version of the double-hulled canoe this past year in preparation for the Tahiti trip.

SOME OF THE PADDLERS for yesterday’s ceremonial cruise into Kaneohe Bay also sung the craft’s praises. Continue reading

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Hokulea! 1975

Photo by Robert B. Goodman for Polynesian Voyaging Society

Not since Kamehameha…

The place is Kaneohe Bay; the date, 1975. But not since the days of Kamehameha has such a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual been seen in Hawaii. The occasion was yesterday’s launching of a double-hulled craft which the Polynesian Voyaging Society will attempt to sail to Tahiti and back next summer. For more pictures and the story, see Hawaii Report on Page A-3.

(Star-Bulletin & Advertiser, 5/9/1975, p. 1)

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Sunday Star-Bulletin and Advertiser, Page A1, March 9, 1975.

 

Ohelo stories from James K. Kahele Jr., a follow up, 1930.

I just noticed that James K. Kahele Jr. states that there are stories not only saying that ohelo originated in Hawaii nei, but previous to this, he says that there are stories of it coming from afar, from Kahiki.

For the rest of the article speaking of the foreign origin stories, click here.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 8/8/1930, p. 3)

Pāʻū riding a hundred ten years ago and more, 1906.

PA-U PARADE ON MONDAY

The Riders Expect to Have a Very Big Turnout.

The Association of Pa-u Riders, otherwise known as the Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii, is making great preparations for its parade of Pa-u riders on Monday, June 11. This society formed by Mrs. Kaimana [Kainana] Puahi and others interested in the preservation of the old Hawaiian manner of horseback riding with the picturesque pa-u immediately following the floral parade of Washington’s birthday, of which parade the pa-u riders formed one of the most attractive features. The ladies have since devoted much time to practice, and to the making of appropriate dresses, and have been helped by the members of the Promotion Committee, by Manager Charles Crane of the Hawaiian Gazette Co. and by many others, to all of whom the members of the Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii wish to return their most sincere thanks.

OBSERVATIONS OF THE DAY.

The program for the day is most complete. At 6:30 in the morning, the members of the hui will meet at the Waikiki residence of Mrs. Puahi, at which time all will don the pa-u. At eight o’clock the line will begin to form, Sheriff A. M. Brown being the marshal of the parade. At 8:30 the procession will move to the Kapahulu road, thence to Beretania street, thence to Washington place. Continue reading

John Wise on Hawaiian Homes and more, 1921.

The Question about the Work Ethic of Hawaiians.

Your writer [John Wise], continues to defend the Hawaiian lahui from being attacked by that question above.

The Hawaiians have perhaps become much talked about amongst those who do not know them and who are not familiar with their accomplishments of today and of the past. And maybe mostly these days for the land being given to us. Your writer frequently clashes with all kinds of other people who protest the giving of land to Hawaiians, because of the ridiculous idea that they don’t know how to work or that they are lazy.

In these attacks, we can see, O Lahui, that they are carried with criticisms and that it is would be a waste to confirm their misbeliefs. But so that the Hawaiians may answer these questions, your writer wants to be made known for all times the sound justification for our side. The readers of past issues of the Kuokoa have seen the responses given by the Commissioner in Washington, and they have seen also the other justifications given, in the newspaper.

The ultimate representation of the skill of a people is their supplying themselves with food and the things necessary for their livelihood. There perhaps is no better response than that. This lahui was living by  themselves for centuries, supplying themselves with everything, and received no assistance from the outside.

But there are things made by this lahui, things that attest to their fine craftsmanship, that will serve as a measure of their skills. Those that see Hawaiian canoes and their manufacture and how they can get Hawaiians through great gales, remaining solid in the dangers of the pounding of waves; how they could make beautiful canoes by using stone adzes; the distance they were taken from mountain to the sea; the patience of the canoe makers. All of these things will show, without being contradicted, that just by seeing the quality of the canoes can one see that this is a lahui that knows how to work. We see the canoes of today being made by people from other lands, and the canoes made by Hawaiians are far more well made and beautiful.

The beauty of things crafted by a people are undeniable proof of the work ethic of that people. Where will you find things more beautiful, O Hawaiians, if you travel all over the world, than the ahuula that are preserved at the Museum of Kamehameha School. Where is the lahui that lives on today, or perhaps has disappeared, that can make these outstanding works, with a beauty second to none, with fine craftsmanship, and patience; with a true sense of work ethic. Snaring birds is a great task all in itself, the inserting [kuku ana] of the feathers is a big job. One mamo feather cloak was said to have been started during the time of Umi and completed during the time of Kamehameha. For this ahu, the entire ahu were done with mamo feathers. And by our counting back, we see that ten generations of ancient kings passed on before the completion of this ahu; showing that it took from about 250 to 300 years of work. Where is there a great work that was completed by a people taking hundreds of years to construct? We perhaps can think of huge things, but as for something of this nature which required the knowledge and patience of men, there is no equal. Continue reading

Happy Birthday, Aunty! 2016.

DON’T BE INDIFFERENT TO GOOD WORKS.

Patience Wiggin is a Japanese baby who is two years old. She was born on Kauai. There are many children in her family, and ten days after the birth of this little girl, her mother passed away. Her father is poor. After fighting with destitution and troubles, he returned the tiny girl to the Children’s Hospital, for he knew he could not care for this child.

The news was told to Miss Lucy Ward about Patience. Her job is to find homes for children like this small girl. So she began to go around searching for a home. She found Mrs. Wiggin, a Hawaiian, who wanted to adopt [hookama] a child. Mrs. Wiggin’s mind was delighted to find a baby of a different ethnicity, and welcomed in Patience. So the young girl gained a fine home and a kind mother.

The Humane Society is one of 23 associations that is provided with funds that are collected for United Welfare [Pono Lokahi] drive. This is something which promotes good will between the different ethnicities of Hawaii nei, and it will provide homes for Japanese orphans and also for children of other races.

Efforts to raise funds will begin on November 28 and continue for two days. This year the goal to be collected is $275,000, and from that sum, the Humane Society will receive $2211.

[For and earlier post, click here. And for even more on Aunty, click here.

If it wasn’t for the young girl in the story, I certainly would not be doing this blog. Hauoli la hanau e Aunty Pat! O KU O KA!!]

(Kuokoa, 11/25/1921, p. 4)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIX, Helu 47, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1921.