The moʻolelo of ʻUmi, yesterday, today, and tomorrow, 2016.

Go check out tomorrow’s brownbag at the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawaii at Manoa!

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Umi, the son of Liloa and Akahiakuleana, 1859.

[Found under: “MOOOLELO HAWAII.—Helu 49.”]

Pertaining to Umi.—Umi was an alii of the people of Hawaii. Here is the history of this alii:

Umi was the son of Liloa, he was not the first son of Liloa, but Hakau was the first son of Liloa with Pinea, who was Liloa’s true “wife” [wahine hoao maoli]; therefore, Hakau was called a high chief, for the rank of Pinea was equal to that of Liloa. Umi however was the child of Liloa with a woman who he just took, her name being Akahiakuleana. It was widely thought that she was not an alii, but according to her genealogy she is indeed an alii; she and Liloa had a common ancestor. They were both descendants of Kanipahu.

Here is the genealogy of that Akahiakuleana from Kanipahu and Liloa’s genealogy from Kanipahu.

Kanipahu dwelt with Alaikauakoke, born was Kalapana, that being Liloa’s ancestor; Kanipahu dwelt with Hualani, born was Kalahumoku, that being Akahiakuleana’s ancestor. Continue reading

Hula and the play “Umi-a-Liloa,” 1917.

TRULY HAWAIIAN IS ‘UMI-A-LILOA’

The hula alaapapa will be one of the special entre act features of the performance of “Umi-a-Liloa” at the opera house next Thursday evening. This hula is danced standing in contradiction to the older hulas which is called for a sitting position. It will be interpreted by a band of four young girls, who are experts in the art of the real Hawaiian dance. They are assisted by a man who beats the hula drum in old-time style. It is only in recent years that the hula has been accompanied by the music of instruments.

The second act contains an elaborate representation of the court of the king of Hawaii in the year 1640 and during the scene of the royal festivity some of the very ancient dances are introduced. They are danced, if one may call it so, sitting cross-legged upon the floor and the beauty of the performance lies in the grace and graphic intensity of the gestures of the body and arms of the dancers. Continue reading