Daughters of Hawaii to Put on Historical Play, 1913.

DAUGHTERS OF HAWAII TO GIVE UNIQUE PROGRAM

The Daughters of Hawaii, an Hawaiian historical society, whose object is to preserve secrets handed down from one generation to another, and whose members are composed of descendents of noted warriors from Alapai nui and Kalaniopuu, kings of Hawaii; Kahekili, king of Maui; Peleioholani and Kahahana, kings of Oahu; Kaeokulani and Kaneoneo, kings of Kauai; Keliiaa of Lanai and Kumukoa of Molokai up to the time of Kamehameha the Conqueror, will give an interesting and purely Hawaiian performance at the opera house on the evening of February 22, as a feature of the Mid-Pacific carnival, the performance forming a portion of the carnival committee’s program.

The performance will deal in tableaux showing famous historical incidents wherein kings and queens, chiefs, chiefesses, warriors and commoners, are shown. These tableaux are faithfully given as to costumes, customs and the beautiful feather cloaks and helmets which formed the regalia of the early rulers, will be seen.

The officers of this society are Mrs. Manuel Reis, president (Keohookalani); Mrs. Haka Iaukea, vice-president (Papakaniau); Mrs. C. M. Blaisdell, secretary and manager (Puea-a-Makakanalii); Mrs. Frank Aki, assistant manager (Kaiakauilani); Miss Pinao, music (kanikapila); Mrs. Pauahi [? Mrs. Puahi], hula.

The members of the society are Keahioka Lua, Kamaeokalani, Kailinaoa, Kailipalaki, Lilinoe, Mrs. Kekumano, Peleioholani, Mrs. Kahalelehua Notley, Mrs. Almira Johnson, Mrs. Lilikalani, Mrs. Paalaa Hook, Mrs. David Maikai, Mrs. Kaikainaalii Munsey, Mrs. Koahou, Mrs. Lydia Kaloio, Mrs. Charles Akau.

Honorary members, Lot Kamehameha, S. L. Peleioholani, Ab. Kaleikau [Abraham Kaleikau], E. K. Lilikalani, Koahau Keliiaa, Naihe Kamakahukilani.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 2/18/1913, p. 5)

DAUGHTERS OF HAWAII TO GIVE UNIQUE PROGRAM

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XX, Number 6514, Page 5. February 18, 1913.

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Hawaii Ponoi Society performance, 1907.

ANCIENT HAWAII ON STAGE

The members of the Hawaii Ponoi Society will give an entertainment illustrating ancient Hawaiian customs at the Opera House on Saturday evening when the following program will be presented:

PROGRAM:

Overture

Kawaihau Glee Club

Tableau

Kaahumanu, Queen of Kamehameha I.

(At a hookupu function, the act of giving gifts by the people and the acceptance of same by the Queen, or by one in authority, as in other instances, being an ancient Hawaiian custom.)

Mrs. Kahaleohu.

Nose Flute Solo

Kaumaka.

Hula Uliuli (Gourd Rattle Dance)

Selection

Waikiki Mandolin Club.

Tableau

Liholiho and Kamamalu (Kamehameha II. and His Queen).

Ukeke Solo (Mouth instrument of wood and strings)

Kaumaka.

Solo

Miss Hao.

Hula Puili (Split Bamboo Dance)

Kaumaka.

Orchestra

Kawaihau Glee Club.

Tableau

Kaikilani, ancient Queen of Hawaii Island.

(a) The queen and her lord, Lonoikamakahiki, playing at a game of konane, similar to draughts; (b) a voice calls the queen; (c) her lord is enraged thereat, believing it an evidence of infidelity; (d) she is struck down; (e) the king deserts the queen, leaving her for dead; (f) their reconciliation.

INTERMISSION.

Orcestra

Kawaihau Glee Club.

Tableau

Keawe-nui-a-Umi, King of Hawaii Island, on a journey in search of his once favorite pilot and body servant, Kuapakaa.

Quartet

Hickey’s Quartet.

Hula Olapa (Swaying Dance)

Tableau

Boki and Liliha, his wife.

(The companions of Kamehameha II. and his queen on their trip to England, and who, upon their return with the corpses of their majesties (who both died in London in 1826) left the islands with a large retinue in several large canoes and were never heard of again.)

Waikiki Mandolin Club.

Solo

Mesdames Rose Kane and Punua.

Tableau

Kamehameha I.

(a) Kamehameha attacked by Ahia and his followers in a pitched battle; (b) he comes out victorious by breaking Ahia’s back in mid-air; (c) the Kamehameha statue, the whole concluding with a chorus.

FINALE.

J. W. L. McGuire, stage manager.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 3/15/1907, p. 6)

ANCIENT HAWAII ON THE STAGE

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLV, Number 7675, Page 6. March 15, 1907.

Hula and the play “Umi-a-Liloa,” 1917.

TRULY HAWAIIAN IS ‘UMI-A-LILOA’

The hula alaapapa will be one of the special entre act features of the performance of “Umi-a-Liloa” at the opera house next Thursday evening. This hula is danced standing in contradiction to the older hulas which is called for a sitting position. It will be interpreted by a band of four young girls, who are experts in the art of the real Hawaiian dance. They are assisted by a man who beats the hula drum in old-time style. It is only in recent years that the hula has been accompanied by the music of instruments.

The second act contains an elaborate representation of the court of the king of Hawaii in the year 1640 and during the scene of the royal festivity some of the very ancient dances are introduced. They are danced, if one may call it so, sitting cross-legged upon the floor and the beauty of the performance lies in the grace and graphic intensity of the gestures of the body and arms of the dancers. Continue reading

Even more local news from a hundred years ago, 1915.

Local News

On the coming 13th in the month of March, an election for county seats will be held, outside of the City and County of Honolulu.

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On the Sierra of this past Monday, Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Taylor returned to this city after spending a year or so in San Francisco.

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The Young People’s League [Ahahui o ka Poe Opiopio] is planning to put on once more a grand concert in the Opera House [Hale Mele Hou], sometime during the coming month.

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Currently being planned is a special excursion for Honolulu’s people aboard the Kilauea to Kauai next month, this coming February.

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From what is being heard, there is much criticism by the people over the appointing of R. W. Aylett as head of the garbage system, for he has a job in the band [Royal Hawaiian Band].

————— Continue reading

More on the Boston, 1893.

[Excerpt from the article: “OVERTHROW IN HAWAII NEI: The Queen Attempts to Push a New Constitution”]

At perhaps 5 oʻclock in the afternoon, the American warship Boston [Bosetona] landed its officers and sailors who were armed. When they came ashore, the marines were split up to go and guard the residence of the American Minister Stevens on Nuuanu Avenue, and the American Consulate on Merchant Street, and the sailors were sent to King Street and stood before the residence of J. A. Hopper, and later they were sent to the residence of Mr. J. B. Atherton. They stayed there for some time, and then all came back and slept in Arion Hall [Ariona Holo] makai of the Opera House. They are still on shore to the present.

(Kuokoa, 1/21/1893, p. 2)

I ka hora 5 paha o ke ahiahi...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 3, Aoao 2. Ianuari 21, 1893.

Competing rallies, 1893.

O HAWAIIAN LAHUI!

Today, there is a rally being called by the Missionaries of the Reformist Party [Poai Hoomaemae] and those who favor them, at Manamana, with the intent to bring harm to the Queen for Her aloha she has for the lahui, in Her proclaiming a new Constitution; by ending Her reign and making this nation a republic. Therefore, patriots, those born of this land, stand strong behind this nation; there shall not be a single true Hawaiian who will participate in this gathering, should they be invited. All of you true Hawaiians, let us stand behind our Sovereign and give our lives for the rights of our Queen and peace over the land. Those citizens who love their alii are called to join together to march straight to the rally fronting the Opera House [Hale Mele Hou] at 2 o’clock in the afternoon. With one heart of aloha and breasts side by side all across the land, you descendants of Kamehameha.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/16/1893, p. 2)

E KA LAHUI HAWAII!

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 623, Aoao 2. Ianuari 16, 1893.

Maori in Hawaii, 1912.

A New Zealand Theater Group.

A New Zealand theater troupe under the leadership of Ara, a man from the Maori people who performs astonishing acts, arrived in Honolulu. After they left their own land, they visited the lands of the South: New Guinea, Fiji, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, and then arrived here. They are taking beautiful shots of Hawaii nei, and when they perform, they have some nice scenes of these islands.

They will also show some pictures of New Zealand, the lifestyle of the Maori, the Hot Volcanic Springs, Palorous Jack [Pelorus Jack], that astonishing piloting fish that guides the way before sailboats when they enter into the harbor of Wellington, and for which a law was made protecting its life, as well as some other lovely pictures of New Zealand. One day in March, they will hold their performance at the Hale Mele Hou [Opera House].

(Aloha Aina, 2/17/1912, p. 1)

HE PUALI KEAKA NU KILANI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 7, Aoao 1. Feberuari 17, 1912.