More on the landing of the Boston, 1893.

OPPOSED.

We have received news that the Ministers of the Queen sent their written protest to the Minister of the United States for his ordering the landing of the armed men from the man-of-war Boston on the evening of this Monday notwithstanding that there was peace on land. And this objection was jointly supported by the Commissioners of the Nations of Great Britain, France, Portugal, and Japan, by them signing a document opposing this action over these reasons—(1), Because of the agreement under law between the Nations to give prior notice. (2),  There was no cause to land the troops being that there was peace.

This is the Law, that being there is no other Nation that has any right to land its troops while there is peace; were there internal problems, but only if there was an uprising or a civil war, only then could there be troops landed to watch over and protect the safety of their citizens as well as their property.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 3)

UA KUE IA.

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 3. Ianuari 18, 1893.

More on the Boston, 1893.

[Excerpt from the article: “OVERTHROW IN HAWAII NEI: The Queen Attempts to Push a New Constitution”]

At perhaps 5 oʻclock in the afternoon, the American warship Boston [Bosetona] landed its officers and sailors who were armed. When they came ashore, the marines were split up to go and guard the residence of the American Minister Stevens on Nuuanu Avenue, and the American Consulate on Merchant Street, and the sailors were sent to King Street and stood before the residence of J. A. Hopper, and later they were sent to the residence of Mr. J. B. Atherton. They stayed there for some time, and then all came back and slept in Arion Hall [Ariona Holo] makai of the Opera House. They are still on shore to the present.

(Kuokoa, 1/21/1893, p. 2)

I ka hora 5 paha o ke ahiahi...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 3, Aoao 2. Ianuari 21, 1893.

Coverage of the landing of the USS Boston, 1893.

The American Troops Come Ashore.

Without knowledge of the Government, and regardless of the agreement of the American Minister that the soldiers from the warship would not come ashore, being that the Government was prepared to uphold the peace; the American Minister ordered the soldiers of the Boston to to take control. This is an apparent act of aggression, and if that nation learns of the truth of this act by its official, it will be grounds for him to be condemned.

[This article and the following are coverage of the landing of the U. S. S. Boston 120 years ago today by different newspapers. Just as we see today, back then there was different coverage depending on what you read.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/17/1893, p. 2)

Ua Lele Mai na koa Amerika.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 624, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1893.