Mali leo, 1893.

Equal Rights Under America.

Editor Bulletin:—

The P. C. A. [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] and Liberal are giving us a duet about the benefits we will derive from annexation. The music is very sweet, but I for one am inclined to be sceptical and want a whole ton of salt with their literary effusions. I can see where owners of Government bonds and water front lots on Pearl Harbor will get the benefits of annexation, but the planters and natives—to use a slang expression—their benefits are out of sight, the planters lose everything and get nothing, and I would like to ask the editor of the Liberal (for the P. C. A. man knows nothing about it), what grounds he has for thinking the kanaka will be any better treated than the Indian or Negro. Continue reading

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Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading

Women of Kauai represent! 1893.

THE WOMEN OF KAUAI

Memorialize Commissioner Blount—They Ask for Restoration.

The following is the text of a memorial which was presented to Commissioner Blount on Monday last, May 15th, by Mrs. Lovell, acting as a Committee of the Women’s Patriotic League of the Island of Kauai. The memorial was signed by 809 Hawaiian women residing on Kauai. It was read to the Commissioner by Mrs. Junius Kaae of this city, through whose efforts the organization was formed on Kauai, and who recently made a circuit of that island to secure the names attached to it. The Commissioner is reported to have spoken most approvingly of the tone and spirit of the memorial, and of the patriotism of the Kauai women in sending it forward.

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Memorial of the Ladies of Kauai, 1893.

Ka Memoriala a na Lede

O KA

Mokupuni o Kauai.

I ka Meahanohano

James H. Blount

Elele Pili Aupuni o Amerika Huipuia ma Hawaii nei.

Me ka Mahalo:—

O makou o ka poe no lakou na inoa malalo iho nei, ke noi a ke hoike aku nei me ka haahaa imua ou penei:

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Mrs. William Hall, 1893.

HAWAII.

Mrs. William Hall Tells of the Arrival of Commissioner Blount.

Disappointment Created by the Taking Down of Old Glory.

How Annexation is Viewed by the People of the Sandwich Islands.

The Daily Rumors Which Alternately Buoy the Annexationists and Royalists.

The following letter from Honolulu was written to Minneapolis friends by Mrs. William Hall, daughter of Mrs. C. O. Van Cleve, the wife of a missionary to the Sandwich islands, and has resided on the islands for the past 30 years. Mrs. Hall’s husband is also a son of a missionary. The story of the courtship and marriage is romantic, for Mr. Hall was visiting Minneapolis when he met Miss Van Cleve, and he fell in love with her at sight. He had only a short time to remain, and as Gen. Van Cleve was then out with a command,the impatient young lover made the journey to the general’s station to tell him he had laid siege to the the daughter’s heart, and that she would surrender if the father gave his consent. Miss Van Cleve afterwards went out to the Sandwich islands, where she was married and began missionary labors with her husband. The letter was written early in April, just after the lowering of the American flag on the islands.

Honolulu, April 5, 1893.

Just as we were in the midst of writing for the mail by the Australia last Wednesday, the telephone announced a United States steamer off Koko Head, supposed to be the revenue cutter Richard Rush, bringing commissioners from Washington to the Hawaiian government. This proved to be correct, and hurrying our letters, we repaired to the water front to see what was to be seen.

The streets were full of people and full of flags. Chicago will hardly fly more bunting to the square yard at the opening of the Columbian Exposition. Everyone hung out a flag of some kind, mostly American, though I noticed “The harp that once through Tara’s halls the soul of music shed,” is hanging “mute” on a green field between two brick buildings on the corner of Fort and Hotel streets, and I think likely, if the trade wind continues as vigorous as at present a few days longer, the cord (chord) will “indignant break.” But to return to our muttons, otherwise streets.

One feature of the display was a procession of native women dressed in white and bearing Hawaiian and American flags, marching down to the wharf to receive and welcome the commissioners.

The Rush entered the harbor and took her place in the naval row. The American minister, the consul, and a committee of three gentlemen boarded her from a steam launch just before she entered the harbor.

It soon became noised abroad that only one commissioner had arrived, and he would not  land for an hour or two. There was some disappointment among the natives when they heard that Admiral Brown had not been sent; others did not quite know whether to be glad or sorry that only one man had been entrusted with this mission.

Soon after the cutter anchored, Maj. Robertson, the ex-queen’s chamberlain, went on board and, presenting the queen’s compliments, offered the commission her carriage in which to ride to the hotel. The offer was declined with thanks, the commissioner had already declined several offers of the kind, preferring to ride in his private carriage. Continue reading