Letter from President Grant to the new king, Lunalilo, 1873.

Letters of Condolences from the European Monarchs to our King.

On the 14th of April, the letter from General Grant, the President of the United States, was received, expressing to our King, that he joins in the grieving for the death of Kamehameha V, and that the President was happy for Chief Lunalilo’s good fortune in ascending the throne of Hawaii nei.

And on the 29th of May, the letters arrived from the alii shown below, and we translated them into our language.

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 6/18/1873, p. 3)

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Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 3. Iune 18, 1873.

R. W. Wood appointed acting commissioner of the US, 1849.

OFFICE U. S. COMMISSION,
Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, May 4, 1849.

ALL PERSONS having any official business with this office, are hereby notified that ROBERT W. WOOD, M. D., has been duly appointed by me to perform the duties of Acting Commissioner of the United States, Continue reading

Neutrality announced in Washington D. C., 1854.

RELIEF FOR TROUBLED EUROPE.

It cannot be doubted that the European Powers now so unhappily engaged in strife will be much relieved by the following kind and considerate proclamation of the King of the Sandwich Islands announcing that his government intends to observe a strict neutrality in regard to the war. The Czar will now breathe freer, and France and England may dismiss all disquietude: Continue reading

Mali leo, 1893.

Equal Rights Under America.

Editor Bulletin:—

The P. C. A. [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] and Liberal are giving us a duet about the benefits we will derive from annexation. The music is very sweet, but I for one am inclined to be sceptical and want a whole ton of salt with their literary effusions. I can see where owners of Government bonds and water front lots on Pearl Harbor will get the benefits of annexation, but the planters and natives—to use a slang expression—their benefits are out of sight, the planters lose everything and get nothing, and I would like to ask the editor of the Liberal (for the P. C. A. man knows nothing about it), what grounds he has for thinking the kanaka will be any better treated than the Indian or Negro. Continue reading

Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading