Women of Kauai represent! 1893.

THE WOMEN OF KAUAI

Memorialize Commissioner Blount—They Ask for Restoration.

The following is the text of a memorial which was presented to Commissioner Blount on Monday last, May 15th, by Mrs. Lovell, acting as a Committee of the Women’s Patriotic League of the Island of Kauai. The memorial was signed by 809 Hawaiian women residing on Kauai. It was read to the Commissioner by Mrs. Junius Kaae of this city, through whose efforts the organization was formed on Kauai, and who recently made a circuit of that island to secure the names attached to it. The Commissioner is reported to have spoken most approvingly of the tone and spirit of the memorial, and of the patriotism of the Kauai women in sending it forward.

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Memorial of the Ladies of Kauai, 1893.

Ka Memoriala a na Lede

O KA

Mokupuni o Kauai.

I ka Meahanohano

James H. Blount

Elele Pili Aupuni o Amerika Huipuia ma Hawaii nei.

Me ka Mahalo:—

O makou o ka poe no lakou na inoa malalo iho nei, ke noi a ke hoike aku nei me ka haahaa imua ou penei:

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Mrs. William Hall, 1893.

HAWAII.

Mrs. William Hall Tells of the Arrival of Commissioner Blount.

Disappointment Created by the Taking Down of Old Glory.

How Annexation is Viewed by the People of the Sandwich Islands.

The Daily Rumors Which Alternately Buoy the Annexationists and Royalists.

The following letter from Honolulu was written to Minneapolis friends by Mrs. William Hall, daughter of Mrs. C. O. Van Cleve, the wife of a missionary to the Sandwich islands, and has resided on the islands for the past 30 years. Mrs. Hall’s husband is also a son of a missionary. The story of the courtship and marriage is romantic, for Mr. Hall was visiting Minneapolis when he met Miss Van Cleve, and he fell in love with her at sight. He had only a short time to remain, and as Gen. Van Cleve was then out with a command,the impatient young lover made the journey to the general’s station to tell him he had laid siege to the the daughter’s heart, and that she would surrender if the father gave his consent. Miss Van Cleve afterwards went out to the Sandwich islands, where she was married and began missionary labors with her husband. The letter was written early in April, just after the lowering of the American flag on the islands.

Honolulu, April 5, 1893.

Just as we were in the midst of writing for the mail by the Australia last Wednesday, the telephone announced a United States steamer off Koko Head, supposed to be the revenue cutter Richard Rush, bringing commissioners from Washington to the Hawaiian government. This proved to be correct, and hurrying our letters, we repaired to the water front to see what was to be seen.

The streets were full of people and full of flags. Chicago will hardly fly more bunting to the square yard at the opening of the Columbian Exposition. Everyone hung out a flag of some kind, mostly American, though I noticed “The harp that once through Tara’s halls the soul of music shed,” is hanging “mute” on a green field between two brick buildings on the corner of Fort and Hotel streets, and I think likely, if the trade wind continues as vigorous as at present a few days longer, the cord (chord) will “indignant break.” But to return to our muttons, otherwise streets.

One feature of the display was a procession of native women dressed in white and bearing Hawaiian and American flags, marching down to the wharf to receive and welcome the commissioners.

The Rush entered the harbor and took her place in the naval row. The American minister, the consul, and a committee of three gentlemen boarded her from a steam launch just before she entered the harbor.

It soon became noised abroad that only one commissioner had arrived, and he would not  land for an hour or two. There was some disappointment among the natives when they heard that Admiral Brown had not been sent; others did not quite know whether to be glad or sorry that only one man had been entrusted with this mission.

Soon after the cutter anchored, Maj. Robertson, the ex-queen’s chamberlain, went on board and, presenting the queen’s compliments, offered the commission her carriage in which to ride to the hotel. The offer was declined with thanks, the commissioner had already declined several offers of the kind, preferring to ride in his private carriage. Continue reading

The wait continues, 1893–2018.

RESTORATION DAY OF HAWAII NEI.

In the first half of the month of February, 1843, Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki] arrived on the shores of Hawaii nei, and due to some things he thought were right, he took down the Hawaiian Flag and raised the British Flag, and this was the first time that the sovereignty of our land was taken. With that act however, the Royal standard [hae Kalaunu] was left alone along with the Sovereign in His place; this was not usurped; and peace was kept by the Hulumanu, the soldiers of Kauikeaouli at the time, and the makaainana remained then under the rule of the King, and they kneeled and prayed to God for the return of the sovereignty of the land to righteousness. Continue reading

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser ridicules the women of the Patriotic League, 1893.

PATRIOTIC WOMEN.

They Object to the Wording of a Memorial.

The Hawaiian Women’s Patriotic League held its third business meeting yesterday morning at Arion Hall. Mrs. F. W. Macfarlane, President, called the meeting to order promptly at 10 o’clock. After reading the minutes by the Secretary, Mrs. Grace Kahalewai, the proposed memorial to United States Commissioner Jas. H. Blount was taken up. The Secretary read it once in Hawaiian, but the ladies in the rear part of the building could not hear her. They requested her to again read the rather lengthy memorial, which was done. The memorial was briefly in this wise: Continue reading

Memorial of the Hawaiian People, 1893.

PETITION

—OF THE—

Hawaiian Natives.

A Committee of 5 members was chosen to take the Petition [Memoriala] of the Hawaiian People which was unanimously passed by the Delegates sent by all of the Districts from all over the Archipelago to the Convention of Delegates, before the Honorable James H. Blount, by the Hawaiian Patriotic League [Hui Hawaii Aloha Aina]; and it was divided thusly, with one member from each Island, like this.

COMMITTEE.

John Richardson     Island of Maui.

S. H. K. Ne     ″ Hawaii.

J. K. Kaiheopulani     ″ Molokai.

Ben Naukana     ″ Oahu.

J. A. Akina     ″ Kauai.

John Richardson was the Chairman [Lunahoomalu] of the Committee. It was exactly at 3 o’clock when it was first announced that the Committee arrived; they were cordially welcomed and the petition of the Lahui was read and it was left with the Honorable James H. Blount. The Commissioner conversed briefly with the Representatives, and at their leave, they expressed their appreciation for their treatment; and that the conversation between the commissioner and the committee was congenial.

Memorial of the Hawaiian People to the American People.

Whereas his Excellency [ka Mea Mahaloia] Grover Cleveland, President of the United States of America, has honored the Hawaiian Nation by sending to us the Hon. James H. Blount as a Special Commissioner [Komisina Wae], to find out the true wishes of the Hawaiian People as to the proposed annexation of their country to their great friend the United States, therefore;

We, the people of the Hawaiian Islands, through the delegates of the branches of the Hawaiian Patriotic League [Hui Hawaii Aloha Aina] of all the districts throughout the kingdom, in convention assembled, take this mode of submitting our appeal and expression of our unanimous wishes to the people of our great and good friend, the Republic of the United States of America, with whom we always entertained the most cordial relations, whom we have learned to look upon as our patrons and most reliable protectors, and whose honor, integrity, and sense of justice and equity we have ever confidently relied for investigation into the grievous wrongs that have been committed against us as a people, against the person of our sovereign, and the independence of our land.

And While we are anxious to promote the closest and most intimate political and commercial relations with the United States, we do not believe that the time has yet come for us to be deprived of our nationality and of our sovereign by annexation to any foreign power.

And Therefore we do hereby earnestly and sincerely pray that the great wrongs committed against us may be righted by the restoration of the independent autonomy and constitutional government of our Kingdom under our beloved Queen Liliuokalani, in whom we have the utmost confidence as a conscientious and popular ruler.¹

SIGNED BY THE REPRESENTATIVES FROM ACROSS THE ARCHIPELAGO

North Hilo—D. Hoakimoa

Central Hilo—K. M. Koahou

Hilo Town—Henry West

Puna—S. T. Piihonua

North Kona ————

″     ″—W. E. N. Kanealii

South Kona—C. G. Naope

North Kohala—S. H. K. Ne

Hamakua—J. H. Halawale

Maui.

Lahaina—R. H. Makekau

Waihee—J. K. Kealoalii

South Wailuku—W. B. Keanu

North Wailuku—Thomas Clark

″     ″—T. B. Lyons

″     ″—D. Kanuha

″     ″—J. Richardson

Makawao—J. Kaluna

″    —J. Kamakele

Honuaula—S. D. Kapono jr.

Hana—S. W. Kaai

Molokai.

Kaunakakai—J. N. Uahinui

Pelekunu—D. Himeni

Wailau—Kekoowai

Ualapue—J. K. Kaiheopulani

Kalaupapa—S. K. Kahalehulu

Halawa—A. P. Kapaehaole

Kainalu—S. K. Piiapoo

Oahu.

District One—F. S. Keiki

″ Two—Charles Keawe

″ Three—J. K. Prendergast

″ Four—E. Johnson

″ Five—S. K. Pua

Ewa—J. K. Kauku

″     —D. W. Keliiokamoku

Waianae—S. W. Kailieha

Waialua—Bejamin Naukana

Waimanalo—J. Kimo

Kauai.

Hanalei—Charles Kahee

Kilauea—George W. Mahikoa

Hanapepe—D. W. Kamaliikane

Waimea—J. A. Akina

Wainiha—S. K. Kaleikini

Waioli—J. Molokai

Joseph Nawahi,

President.

J. K. Kaulia

Secretary.

[See also mention of a picture taken of the committee that took the Memoriala to Blount from an earlier post here.]

¹Taken from p. 504 of the Blount Report.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 5/3/1893, p. 2)

MEMORIALA A KA Lahui Hawaii.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 697, Aoao 2. Mei 3, 1893.

The Hawaiian Flag, an unwavering tree, 1893.

THE HAWAIIAN FLAG AT A GOVERNMENT OFFICE.

In the morning of Friday last week, September 22, the stripes of the Hawaiian Flag, second in beauty to no other, was seen in the Business Office of the Postmaster General [Luna Leta Nui].

And this is something astonishing for us to see that the Hawaiian Flag is placed in the Office of one of the Heads of Government appointed by the Provisional Government [Aupuni Kuikawa].

Our friends will perhaps not have forgotten the thoughts we published earlier pertaining to the Hawaiian Flag.

The Commissioner of the United States came to Hawaii, whose name will never be forgotten by this people, Hon. James H. Blount, When he ordered that the American flag be taken down and the Hawaiian Flag be raised once again. We made it clear that the Hawaiian Flag was the foundation of this Nation, and it is the unwavering tree; and seeing its stripes once more shows us that its branches are growing, that being the Royal Standard of Queen Liliuokalani.

Therefore we report to you each and everyday all the signs that we see, and we also give advice to the Lahui, to live with patience, to hold your breath, for it is Almighty God’s time now to make right our Nation’s leadership.

The reestablishing of Queen Liliuokalani to the throne of Hawaii nei, that is not something for man to do, but it is for Jehovah. And as for this Government Head, it is as if he is trying to cover up their wrongdoings.¹ How sad.

¹See Olelo Noeau, p. 313, no. 2859, for more on “Uhiuhi lau mamane ka wai o Kapapala.”

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/25/1893, p. 3)

KA HAE HAWAII MA KE KEENA OIHANA.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 776, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 25, 1893.

Senator John T. Morgan replies, 1897.

MORGAN’S REPLY.

The Senator From Alabama Answers J. K. Kaulia’s Open Letter.

He Defends the Position of Himself and the Annexationists.

Honolulu, Oct. 12, 1897.

Mr. James K. Kaulia,

Dear Sir,—A pressure of engagements has necessarily delayed an answer to your open letter.

Having no disposition to interfere in Hawaiian affairs or to attempt to influence the opinions of the Hawaiians on the subject of annexation to the United States, or to any country, I do not wish to enter upon a discussion, which you invite, as to any views I have heretofore expressed on that subject.

A preference is quite a different matter from an alternative, when the latter is forced upon us by circumstances beyond our control. As my government has not submitted to a vote of our people, the question of our willingness to accept the annexation of Hawaii, and has not a proceeding so unusual and so idle, I have not thought it necessary, or fair, that this question should be submitted to a popular vote in Hawaii, Your Constitution provides for annexation without such a vote. But I would regret to have you feel that I am indifferent to the wishes of your people on this subject; I wish them to feel that our motives are honorable; that our sentiments are only those of sincere regard for their happiness, and that our course towards them will be wise and just.

I have said in the Senate that if I was a Hawaiian citizen I would not prefer annexation to any country. If I were a Cuban I would have the same preference for a separate and independent Republic, won by Cuban blood. This is in the sense of national pride, which must always yield to national safety.

But the present condition of Cuba and of Hawaii does not admit of such a preference.

Cuba has found that she must be a republic in order to escape the terrors of foreign monarchial rule, and Hawaii must also remain a republic to avoid sinking into a like condition.

If Hawaii relapses into monarchy she will be cut off from any reliance on the protection of the United States. In that event we could not accept her into our Union, nor could we, in any event, accept Hawaii as a dependency, or colony. We have no such powers under our Constitution.

When the alternative is presented as it is, whether I would prefer annexation to the United States rather than have Hawaii sink into a petty monarchy, to be ruled by some foreign country, I would prefer to save the liberties of the people, through annexation, to a tawdry show of royalty by a few persons set in authority over them, who would be compelled to do the bidding of some monarch. In the American Union Hawaii would be really independent, and would be forever safe against any foreign interference. She would not be smothered with Asiatic immigrants, nor would she ever become a sugar colony of a monarch, as Cuba is, to be robbed and oppressed by non-resident nabobs, and then flayed alive on the first utterance of a plea or protest in the name of humanity. Finding that it is necessary to act in order to meet the clandestine movements of some citizens and others who are subjects of foreign monarchies, for the destruction of republican government in Hawaii, I would prefer annexation to the United States, rather than risk the danger of having to fight for the life of the country, as Cuba is forced to do.

When Japau wished to annex Formosa to her Empire, she did not consult the Chinese there, to ascertain their wishes. When by a process of emigration Japan has filled these islands with her people, who still owe allegiance to the Emperor, she will ask no questions of the Hawaiians whether they wish to become Japanese subjects; nor will your people be able to resist this quiet process of absorption, you will sink, as the rains sink into the thirsty soil.

If your people were all united in their preference for republican government, I would, if I were a citizen of Hawaii, now prefer her separate independence, as a matter of pride, yet I remember how costly, to Ireland, a like feeling has been, and how it has lost to her people all hope of separate national independence, but the Hawaiian Islands are not independent of fate, however much their native people may desire a separate government. If I belonged to that race I would sacrifice any preference, either of pride or convenience, rather than be suffocated with people who have nothing in common with them in religion, or in their ideas of government. I would unite with the American people in their support of free, constitutional government rather than see any republic relapse into a monarchy, in this Western Hemisphere.

Very respectfully,

John T. Morgan.

(Independent, 10/16/1897, p. 3)

MORGAN'S REPLY.

The Independent, Volume V, Number 716, Page 3. October 16, 1897.