Name song for Kamehameha V by Kamehameha III, 1868.

HE INOA NO KAMEHAMEHA V.

Kalani nui Kapuaiwa i ke kapu he inoa,
O ulupuni o ke aloha uluahewa,
O hoolailai e ko mai ke ano,
He ano aloha no kuu makuahine,
No’u keia liliha kumakena,
E luanuu a Keakalaniakau,
O ke kakau uhi kikowana o kewe,
Inoa makapala o Ahukini,
O oe kai luna o Kahakoililani,
I ka he o Mamakalau o Waikulani,
O Waikulani o ka manu haalilo,
Nana ia Lani na Ekamapu,
Na ka manu mapu o Kaulia,
Nana i leleluna o Numehalani,
I lele kohai i ka wa o Lauahea,
I ke kowa kapu o Hinamalailena,
I maka noenoe lani wahine a ma,
E hanini wale ana no ka waimaka,
Aloha oe—Olia? Continue reading

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A Name Song for Kamehameha V, 1868.

HE INOA NO KAMEHAMEHA V.

Kalaninui Kapuaiwa i ke kapu he inoa,
He kua kapu oe no Waialii kukai kapu na Lono,
O Lono o ke kai maeleha kapu ka leo i Kolea la,
Ka Ewauli o Laakona ke’lii nona ia kua—e,
Hanohano Lahaina i ka ua Nalina,
Ke kipu mai  la i na kahawai,
O ka omaka wai ke iho la i kai,
Ilina opala aku la kai o Hauola,
I ka hoonuua ia e ka makani Malanai,
He noe ke kino oia makani ke pa mai,
Ulu iho la maha pepe ka lau o ka maia,
Ana ole i ka hookinaia e ke kaao—e,
Ua—i—I aku la oe iaia nei—e. Continue reading

Day honoring Kamehameha Paiea, 1892.

KAMEHAMEHA DAY

This 11th day of June is one of the important days for Hawaiians, cherished and greatly displayed amongst the holidays of the land. This day was established by Kamehameha V as a day of remembrance for his royal kupuna Kamehameha I, the conqueror of the nation who unified all of the islands to be governed under one alii. Continue reading

This must have been an awesome image, 1875.

SUPERB GIFT

FROM THE

Kuokoa Newspaper for 1876!

This coming year, 1876, the Kuokoa Newspaper, and Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation, will gift to its people who prepay their two dollars, a superb and proud gift, that being Pictures of the seven Monarchs of Hawaii nei, from Kamehameha I, the “Napoleon of the Pacific;” Liholiho I., Kamehameha II.; Kamehameha III.; Kamehameha IV., Liholiho II.; Kamehameha V.; Lunalilo I.; and Kalakaua I. Their Pictures will be all printed on thick paper so that it can be taken care of greatly. Continue reading

A fire to celebrate the birthday of Kamehameha V? 1868.

Commotion-Inciting Fire.—The fire bells of Honolulu rang out in the evening of this past Friday, and off went the firemen; come to find out, the fire was the work of Miss Bingham folk. The large fire that they set was purportedly to honor the birthday of the King. If this was done with good intentions, why were the members of the fire department not informed prior to this? We saw in the P. C. A. paper a clarification of their apology to the fire department; Continue reading

All kinds of random things in the local news column, 1866.

LOCAL  NEWS.

The number of whaling ships docked in the harbor by our count yesterday reached a total of 30.

Some haole people went touring aboard the warship Vanderbilt on this past Tuesday and Wednesday.

We saw a number of new Pianos in the Shop of Melchers & Co. being for sale to those who want them.

Queen Emalani returned to the premises of her mother, that being the estate of Dr. Rooke [Kauka Ruka]. She is there where she is finding comfort and it is there that she is finding relaxation.

Habor Dredger.—The Kaulu is performing its duties in digging up the mud from our harbor. But it is now seaside of Ainahou where it is cleaning. Continue reading

J. H. Kanepuu the traditionalist, 1970.

Hawaiian Math

By Russell and Peg Apple

BY THE MID 1800s, the Hawaiian people were betwixt and between two cultures. There was the pull and the momentum of the old—the traditional Hawaiian; and the lure and exhortations of the new—a New England brand of Western.

And the Hawaiians were aware of the situation. They were not above pointing out to each other the conflicts they met in their everyday life.

One who did so was a man from Palolo, a Mr. J. H. Kanepuu. He wrote in the Hawaiian language newspaper Ke Au Okoa, and on Jan. 21, 1867, saw the need to call attention to two counting systems that existed side by side.

KANEPUU NOTED the conflict in the markets where Hawaiians bought and sold. There was a generation gap in methods of enumeration. Most of the fishermen and farmers who sold in the markets were old men who counted by the Hawaiian method. Those who bought were younger folks who counted by the haole system. Few knew both well.

The momentum and practices of the past fixed the habit patterns of the fishermen who caught flying fish, mullet, mackerel and milkfish for the Honolulu markets. They either sold their catch themselves, or it was sold by family members of the same generation. They counted Hawaiian style.

Those who bought counted haole style. They had been to the mission and public schools. They knew how to count by tens, from one on up into the tens of thousands. Each had ten fingers, including thumbs, to help.

BUT THE Hawaiian system was based on the numeral four, not the decimal system. Hawaiians had four fingers on each hand to help in counting.

Both the old timers and the younger Hawaiians spoke Hawaiian fluently. But the haole terms had been translated into Hawaiian and taught to the people who went to school, along with the counting-by-tens method. It was the same sort of confusion which occurs today when a nation switches from pounds-shillings-and-pence to a coinage based on the decimal system. Or when a student who learned his work in inches, feet, yards and miles tries to deal with millimeters, centimeters, meters kilometers. Misunderstandings and confusion result.

LOT KAMEHAMEHA, later to rule as Kamehameha V, was educated by Christian missionaries and was versed in the Western system. Kanepuu wrote that when he was still Prince Lot, he received a gift of fish at his house in Honolulu. This was sometime in the early 1800s, before Lot Kamehameha was crowned.

The men who brought the fish used the old system, the Prince only understood the new.

“How much fish?” asked the prince.

“One lau and nine kaau,” answered the Hawaiian servant who delivered the fish, a gift from chief Kuhia.

THIS ANSWER distressed Lot Kamehameha and he alsmost became angry. On seeing this, the Hawaiian switched to the new system. Continue reading