Exciting news from Chronicling America, 2013.

I just received an email from the Library of Congress saying that Chronicling America has been updated to included 600,000 more pages of newspapers, including some from Hawaii nei!

I am excited that we can now search the Polynesian (5/18/1844 to 4/25/1863) as well as the Pacific Commercial Advertiser (7/2/1856 to 12/29/1883)!

Check out the list of available Hawaii newspapers here!

And don’t forget that you can find Hawaii related news not only in Hawaii newspapers… Hawaiians travelled everywhere, and Hawaii got news coverage across the globe.

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Admiral Richard Thomas honored once again, 1857.

BY AUTHORITY.

By order of the King, the Chief [Kamehameha IV], it is hereby proclaimed that in order to show the aloha of his Nation at the passing of Admiral Richard Thomas, the one who returned the islands of Hawaii and the Hawaiian Flag on the 31st of July, 1843 to the King recently deceased, seventeen minute guns [pu minuke] will be fired from Puowaina [the fort at Punchbowl] at 12 o’clock on this day, and the Alii will go into mourning and all of the officers of the King’s government shall wear black crepe [hoailona kanikau] on their left arm for fifteen days.

M. KEKUANAOA, Chief Chamberlain [Haku Puuku],

Office of the Chamberlain [Oihana Puuku], 12th of Dec., 1857.

(Hae Hawaii, 12/16/1857, p. 150.)

NA KE AUPUNI.

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou.—Helu 38, Aoao 150. Dekemaba 16, 1857.

Restoration celebration at Kaniakapupu, 1847.

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The 31st of July, appears to have become a national holyday among the Hawaiians. So far from discouraging its annual observance, we think it should be rather encouraged. A proper recognition of the day will foster a spirit of patriotism. The late anniversary appears to have been partly festive and partly religious. It was so intended.—All classes of our population were invited to a picnic at His Majesty’s summer residence in Nuuanu Valley. Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, great numbers resorted thither; besides pedestrians, several thousands on horse back. Says the Polynesian, “one man hired to count them, commenced early in the day and made out 3,600, going up and 4,600 down—another 1,637 following the King, and 362 straggling. His account was only for part of the day.—The Governor’s computation is 3,000, besides those that come from Koolau.” Suffice it to say, probably a larger company has not been assembled for many years.

Our limits will not allow a detailed account of the animating scenes of the day. A multitude seemed much interested in the spear-exercise and other Hawaiian sports. A sumptuous entertainment was spread for foreigners, while the Hawaiians were served, in a style, that reflected great credit upon His Majesty, the Governor, Paki, John Ii, and others who were directly or indirectly concerned. We can truly remark, that we never witnessed so numerous a gathering, where such perfect order, propriety and regularity were maintained. “There seemed to be a place for every man and every man was in his place.” The following summary of the various dishes served up for the occasion will show that the tables must have groaned under the weight of the viands:—

271 hogs, 482 large calabashes of poi, 602 chickens, 3 oxen, 2 barrels salt pork, 2 of bread, 3,125 salt fish, 1,820 fresh do., 12 1-2 barrels luau and cabbage, 4 do. onions, 18 bunches bananas, 55 pine apples, 10 barrels potatoes, 55 ducks, 82 Turkeys, 2,245 cocoanuts, 4,000 heads of kalo, 180 squid, Grapes and other etcetera, sufficient to feast 12,000 people.

We must not fail to notice one circumstance which was something new for this quarter of the globe. “A coach and four” was a new feature in the procession of a Polynesian chieftain. The Royal party rose in the carriage originally presented by Queen Victoria to her sister Queen, Pomare, but which the latter, in her poverty, was obliged to dispose of by sale. We very much doubt whether any King ever rode through the streets of the capital of his kingdom, when greater order and decorum reigned. To the triumph of Temperance principles among the Hawaiians and foreigners, must be attributed much of the good order that was every where apparent throughout the day.

In the evening, His Majesty, chiefs, foreign officers of government, many of the residents, and numbers of the native population assembled for religious service at the King’s Chapel. A discourse was preached in native and afterwards repeated in English, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong. The singing was good. The sermon of the Mr. Armstrong has already been published in the columns of the Government Organ. We hops it will be read.

[This and the rest of The Friend can be found here at the click of a mouse on the Mission Children Society page!

This celebration is also described in Thrum’s Annual for 1930!]

(Friend, 8/12/1847, p. 117.)

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The Friend, Volume V, Number XV, Page 117. August 12, 1847.

Restoration Celebration at Luakaha, in Nuuanu, 1843.

FEAST OF THE KING.

Here is the food that M. Kekuanaoaʻs overseers [konohiki] contributed for the feast of the King upland of Nuuanu at Luakaha on the 3rd of August.

Mahuka, 2 pigs, 3 chickens, 53 coconuts. Maalaiki, 1 chicken. Hanakauluna, 2 chicken. Kanana, 1 chicken. Nui, 1 pig, 1 basket of sweet potato. Kumupala, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 5 sweet potato, 5 taro. Kauwai, 1 chicken. Nalapauwahiole, 2 chicken, 6 taro. Kaluahinenui, 1 lau [400] fish, 36 coconuts. Mu, 1 pig. Kanoa, 37 coconuts. Makahopu, 1 chicken. Nailimai, 1 chicken. Nahalelauhala, 2 chicken. Puuloa, 1 chicken. Kalalawalu, 1 pig. Kaohe, 1 chicken. Kaleimakalii, 1 chicken. Kepu, 2 chicken. Kinopu, 1 pig. Hueu, 2 chicken. Napohaku, 1 chicken. Kaaua, 2 pigs, 1 chicken, 1 turkey, 2 ducks, 120 fish. Koiamai, 1 chicken. Nalino, 2 chicken. Kamaukoli, 1 pig, 4 poi, 120 fish. Paele, 1 chicken, 5 baskets of sweet potato [kiki uala], 10 taro. Kahakuailii, 1 chicken. Kaaipuna, 1 chicken, 1 duck. Polikua, 2 pigs. Kikaha, 1 pig. Kekoaalohiu, 1 pig. Kaiwi, 1 chicken. Kaniho, 1 pig, 2 poi. Kawahinelawaia, 1 chicken. Kahanamoku, 1 pig. Kapoo, 1 chicken. Kaluhia, 3 chicken. Makahuluhulu, 1 chicken. Keliikumoku, 1 poi. Kokahi, 1 pig. Honaunau, 1 pig, 55 taro.

Here is the food that Kamehameha’s very own konohiki contributed for his feast.

Wiliama, T. 1 pig, 2 poi, 8 fish, 1 chicken. G. P. Judd, 2 pig, 7 poi, 8 fish. Kanoa, 1 pig. Huakini, 1 pig. Wahahee, 1 pig, 6 taro. Kekai, 1 poi, 50 fish. Kanaina, 1 pig. Kalama, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 6 taro, 1 poi, 1 basket of sweet potato. Namakeha, 1 chicken, 1 poi. Keohokalole, 2 pig, 27 coconuts. Kalaimoku, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaaoao, 1 poi. Kalunaaina, 1 pig, 1 poi. Kamakahonu, 30 fish. Namauu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Piikoi, 2 poi, 1 duck, 1 pig, 10 fish. Papa, 4 sweet potato. Kealakai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Nakoa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaeo, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kailiwai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kelama, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kanewili, 1 poi. Kapu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Koa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kahoe, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Lahilahi, 1 pig, 1 poi. Haole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Ulunui, 4 fish. Ulualoha, 1 pig. Kale, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Hinau, 1 poi. Makole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kuaana, 2 poi, 20 fish. He 60 fish. Kuke, 1 pig, 1 poi. Punahele, 1 poi, 10 fish. Alapai, 1 pig. Kala, 1 poi, 1 pig. Kahaaualii, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kamokuholohewa, 1 poi. Kekuaiwahia, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Puhalahua, 1 pig, 1 chicken. Ioane Ii, 2 pig, 1 chicken, 2 turkey. Kanina, 1 pig. Kaawahua, 1 poi, grapes. Maalahia, 1 poi, grapes. Kaapuiki, 1 chicken. Kaihiwa, 1 pig. Keaniani, 1 pig. Kaaha, 1 pig. Kaunuohua, 300 lemons.

Those were the konohiki who contributed to the king’s celebratory feast, and there were many konohiki of the King and M. Kekuanaoa who did not contribute to this celebratory feast of the king for the return of the land to him. And these konohiki who did not contribute, are without aloha, and without joy for the return of the nation to our king.

At perhaps 11 o’clock was when the King went up with his men in their …

(Nonanona, 8/5/1843, p. 28)

AHAAINA A KE LII.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 28. Augate 8, 1843.

glory; and the haole of the warships, in their best; and the musicians. And when they reached the uplands and entered into the grass house [hale pili], that was when the celebration began with music.

When the food was ready on the table spread over with greenery, it was 32 feet long and 2 feet wide. And the amount of food placed on this table was: 60 pigs, 300 chicken, 40 turkeys, 58 ducks. With all the supplies necessary to prepare this food; Kamamalu 1 set of supplies [? ukana], Lota 1 ukana; Liholiho 1 ukana; Mose 1 ukana; Lunalilo 1 ukana.

The number of servants was over forty per ukana. There were 250 plates, 250 knives, 250 forks, 250 bowls, 250 cups, 150 spoons. And the number of those who ate were probably over 250; there were two prominent haole: Commodore Kearny from the American man-of-war, and the head of the United States warships in East India. Ana Admiral R. Thomas of the British warship, the head of the British warships in the Pacific.

There were four flags raised above the troops while the feast went on: one British flag, one American flag, one French flag, and one Hawaiian flag; and the king’s standard stood near to where the king was.

When the  feast was over, most on foot went back; all together the men, women, and children totaled 2000 or perhaps more. The number of horses were 270, and the riding on the horses on the return was by fours, with two flags and the musicians, while from their mouths came hip hip hurrah [hipi hipi hulo] with great joy all the way until Haliimaile. Written by I. H. Paehewa, Secretary

The Fort. August 5, 1843.

[Anyone know how “ukana” is being used here? Calabash?]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

"...kou hanohano..."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 5, 1843.

English Song for the Restoration of the Kingdom, 1893.

[The Hawaiian Historical Society, on their Facebook page, posted this awesome image of the English lyrics of the “Restoration Anthem,” which it seems was sung at the luau given by Kamehameha III at Luakaha!]

Restoration Anthem.

Tune. God save the King

Hail! to our rightful king!
We joyful honor bring,
This day to thee!
Long live your Majesty!
Long reign thou dynasty!
And for posterity,
The sceptre be

Hail! to the worthy name!
Worthy his country’s fame!
Thomas, the brave!
Long shall they virtues be,
Shrined in our memory
Who came to set us free
Quick oe’r the wave!

Hail! to our Heavenly King!
To thee our thanks we bring,
Worthy of all.
Loud, we thine honors raise!
Loud, is our song of praise!
Smile on our future days,
Sovereign of all.

July 31, 1843

Sung at the great cold water luau given by H.H.M. Kamehameha III, in Nuuanu to several thousands of natives and all the Foreigners including the officers of 4 ships of war. For which Admiral Thomas thanked the ladies and gent who did him the honor.

[unclear phrase]  August 20, 1843

Song for the Restoration of the Kingdom, 1843.

MELE HOI HOU ANA.

(Leo, ‘E Ola ke Alii i ke Akua.’)

1.  E ko makou alii!
Mahalo ‘ka moi,
I keia la!
E mau kou ola nei!
E mau kou aupuni!
No na hanauna hoi,
I oni paa.

2.  Nani! ka inoa maikai!
Me kona aina nae!
Toma ke koa!
Mahalo ‘kou maikai,
Kou wikiwiki mai!
Maluna o ke kai,
E kuu ‘na pau!

3.  Hiilani i ke Lii!
Iehova ka Moi,
E hapai no;
Nui ke kupinai!
Nui ke mele nae!
I mau ka pomaikai
Ia oe no.

Honolulu, Oahu, Iulai 31, 1843.

(Nonanona, 9/5/1843, p. 44)

MELE HOI HOU ANA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 8, Aoao 44. Sepatemaba 5, 1843.