Queen Victoria Picture given to subscribers of Kuokoa, 1879.

PRESENT FOR 1879.

PICTURE OF VICTORIA!

THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND.

This beautiful picture will be given to all those who take the Kuokoa newspaper for 1879, with payment for the subscription of two dollars before the 31st of March. Continue reading

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Just because something appears in a newspaper doesn’t necessarily make it true, 1865.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

News from a Far Country.—The following item is clipped from the Weekly London Times:

An Irish Queen in the Sandwich Islands.—The fact that Queen Emma of the Sandwich Islands is expected in Europe gives interest to the following details:—The Sandwich Islands were thus named in 1778, by Captain Cook, in honor of Lord Sandwich, then First Lord of the Admirality. The inhabitants are of the Polynesian race, and were long governed by a number of native chiefs perpetually at war with each other. In 1784 one of them, Kamehameha I., subjected all the islands to his authority, established a monarchy, took up his residence in the town of Honolulu, in the island of Oahu, and reigned until his death in 1819. His dynasty is still on the throne. The present King, Kamehameha V., aged thirty-five, succeeded his brother, who had left no children, in 1863. He has reformed the constitution of the State, favoured trade, manufactures, and the settlement of foreigners, and has acquired the love of his people. The Minister of Finance, M. Crosnier de Varigny, is a Frenchman; the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Wilkie, was born in Scotland; and the Minister of Interior, Mr. Hopkins, is a native of London; the Minister of Justice and the Chancellor, Mr. Harris and Mr. Allen, are both citizens of the United States. This Cabinet is much esteemed by the Chambers. Queen Emma is a native of Ireland, and is aged twenty-nine. She married in 1856 Kamehameha IV., the late King, but lost her only son in 1862, and her husband in the following year. Queen Victoria has placed a ship of war at her disposal for her voyages to Europe, where she intends to visit successively England, France and Germany.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 9/30/1865, p. 2)

News from a Far Country...

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume X, Number 13, Page 2. September 30, 1865.

Prince Albert baptized, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Ka Haku o Hawaii Baptized.—His Highness, ka Prince of Hawaii was baptized at 10 oʻclock on Saturday, the 23rd of this month at the Palace [Hale Alii], by Rev. E. W. Clark [E. W. Kalaka], in the Anglican faith, before his Royal Parents, the Alii, and the Ministers, and his was named Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha. The wife of the British Commissioner stood in for Queen Victoria of England, the godmother [makuahine Papatema] of the young chief, and Mr. Synge, the British Commissioner, stood in for the Prince of Wales, the Heir to the Throne of England. It was intended for the Bishope to do the baptismal, but because he has not arrived, and the Alii is in distress, therefore, he was baptized before the Commissioner of England who is among the Royal court here.

(Kuokoa, 8/30/1862, p. 2)

Babetisoia ka Haku o Hawaii.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke 1, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Augate 30, 1862.

Queen Victoria letter to Sanford Dole, 1894.

Queen Victoria to President Dole.

At midday of this past Thursday, the President gave an audience in the Executive Building [Iolani Palace] for the Queen of Britain’s Commissioner and Consul General, Mr. A. G. S. Hawes, who handed over to him personally this important national greeting from the Royal one, Queen Victoria.

Victoria, by the grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen Defender of the Faith, Empress of India, and so forth, and so forth, and so forth.

To the President of the Republic of Hawaii, Sendeth Greeting!

Our Good Friend! We have received the letter which you addressed to us on the 7th day of July last, in which you informed us that you had been elected President of the Republic of Hawaii, in accordance with the constitution which was proclaimed on the 4th of that month. We thank you for this communication, and we request you to accept our congratulations on this distinguished mark of the confidence of your fellow citizens;and we offer you our best wishes for your health and welfare, and for the prosperity of the Republic over which you preside.

And so we commend you to the protection of the Almighty.

Given at Our Court at Balmoral the nineteenth day of September 1894, in the 58th year of our reign.

Your good friend,

(Signed by the Queen’s own hand.)

(Signed by the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ own hand.)

[The queen seems to have been led to believe that Dole had the support of “his fellow citizens”…]

(Kuokoa, 11/17/1894, p. 2)

Moiwahine Victoria ia Peresidena Dole.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 46, Aoao 2.

Restoration celebration at Kaniakapupu, 1847.

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The 31st of July, appears to have become a national holyday among the Hawaiians. So far from discouraging its annual observance, we think it should be rather encouraged. A proper recognition of the day will foster a spirit of patriotism. The late anniversary appears to have been partly festive and partly religious. It was so intended.—All classes of our population were invited to a picnic at His Majesty’s summer residence in Nuuanu Valley. Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, great numbers resorted thither; besides pedestrians, several thousands on horse back. Says the Polynesian, “one man hired to count them, commenced early in the day and made out 3,600, going up and 4,600 down—another 1,637 following the King, and 362 straggling. His account was only for part of the day.—The Governor’s computation is 3,000, besides those that come from Koolau.” Suffice it to say, probably a larger company has not been assembled for many years.

Our limits will not allow a detailed account of the animating scenes of the day. A multitude seemed much interested in the spear-exercise and other Hawaiian sports. A sumptuous entertainment was spread for foreigners, while the Hawaiians were served, in a style, that reflected great credit upon His Majesty, the Governor, Paki, John Ii, and others who were directly or indirectly concerned. We can truly remark, that we never witnessed so numerous a gathering, where such perfect order, propriety and regularity were maintained. “There seemed to be a place for every man and every man was in his place.” The following summary of the various dishes served up for the occasion will show that the tables must have groaned under the weight of the viands:—

271 hogs, 482 large calabashes of poi, 602 chickens, 3 oxen, 2 barrels salt pork, 2 of bread, 3,125 salt fish, 1,820 fresh do., 12 1-2 barrels luau and cabbage, 4 do. onions, 18 bunches bananas, 55 pine apples, 10 barrels potatoes, 55 ducks, 82 Turkeys, 2,245 cocoanuts, 4,000 heads of kalo, 180 squid, Grapes and other etcetera, sufficient to feast 12,000 people.

We must not fail to notice one circumstance which was something new for this quarter of the globe. “A coach and four” was a new feature in the procession of a Polynesian chieftain. The Royal party rose in the carriage originally presented by Queen Victoria to her sister Queen, Pomare, but which the latter, in her poverty, was obliged to dispose of by sale. We very much doubt whether any King ever rode through the streets of the capital of his kingdom, when greater order and decorum reigned. To the triumph of Temperance principles among the Hawaiians and foreigners, must be attributed much of the good order that was every where apparent throughout the day.

In the evening, His Majesty, chiefs, foreign officers of government, many of the residents, and numbers of the native population assembled for religious service at the King’s Chapel. A discourse was preached in native and afterwards repeated in English, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong. The singing was good. The sermon of the Mr. Armstrong has already been published in the columns of the Government Organ. We hops it will be read.

[This and the rest of The Friend can be found here at the click of a mouse on the Mission Children Society page!

This celebration is also described in Thrum’s Annual for 1930!]

(Friend, 8/12/1847, p. 117.)

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The Friend, Volume V, Number XV, Page 117. August 12, 1847.

La Hoihoi Ea, 1843.

THE RESTORATION.

This day, July thirty first, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, will hereafter be referred to, as memorable in the history of the Sandwich Islands Government. The existence of the Government has often been threatened, but it has been most signally preserved. It is easy to trace the superintending Providence of God in every stage of its advancement. Many months since persons acquainted with its condition were fully aware that a most important crisis was approaching. It was seen that if the nation continued independent favorable influences must be exerted on the other side of the world. While the most amicable negotiations were going forward, an English Man of War anchors in this harbor. Immediate hostile action was threatened unless the Government yielded to certain demands. Those having been acceded to, others more exhorbitant were forth coming. The King finding himself involved in difficulties, which were not of his own making, under a reservation most reluctantly made a Provisional Cession of his dominions to the Queen of England.

He signed the treaty of cession while bathed in tears. At 3 oʻclock, P. M. Feb. 25, 1843, the National Flag was taken down, while that of England was raised. Never shall we forget the day. To the native population and a majority of the Foreign Residents of all nations, it was a day of sadness. They knew not as their eyes would ever again behold the Flag of Kamehameha III., waving over his rightful dominions. Whoever shall write an accurate history of the period which has since elpased must draw some dark shades to the picture.

The arrival of H. M. S. Dublin, and the negotiations which have taken place between the Admiral and the King, present affairs in a different aspect, which to most in this community is as unexpected as joyful.

The King is to receive a full restoration of his rights, privileges and and dominions. This morning, a public recognition of this restoration will take place. At 10 oʻclock, A. M., His Majesty Kamehameha III., will appear upon the plain East of the town. His standard will be unfurled under a general salute; which being finished, the National Flag will be displayed on both Forts, and be saluted by H. B. M. Ships with 21 guns each, which will be answered from the Forts. At one oʻclock, public religious services will be held in the Stone Church. At three oʻclock, His Majesty will embark to visit Richard Thomas, Rear Admiral of the White, H. B. M. Ship Dublin.

If reports are true, there will be other salutes and exhibitions of public joy! No doubt many hearty wishes and fervent prayers will be uttered for the prosperity of the King, and the welfare of the Government. To the latest generation may a lineal and worthy successor of His Majesty Kamehameha III., sit upon the throne of his ancestors. All genuine lovers of the Sandwich Islands Government, here and throughout the world, will cherish in grateful recollection the memory of Rear Admiral THOMASʻ timely interferance and noble deeds in behalf of a feeble, but well disposed people, who are struggling amid many hindrances to preserve their National Independence.

[This is from a special edition of the Advocate and Friend published on the very day of the restoration. The rest of the coverage can be seen here on the Mission Houses Museum page! Mahalo to Dwight Baldwin (descendant of the Temperance Advocate, and Seamenʻs Friend editor Samuel C. Damon) via Nathan Napoka for reminding me that there are indeed Hawaii newspapers other than Hawaiian-Language Newspapers.]

(Advocate and Friend, 7/31/1843, p. 38)

THE RESTORATION.

Advocate and Friend. (Extra). July 31, 1843, p. 38.