Samuel K. Kekoowai on the Daughters of Hawaii and Hanaiakamalama, 1923.

HANAIAKAMALAMA

This is a building near the end of the route of the electric car, and it stands on a hill.

As a result of the graciousness of one of the members of the Daughters of Hawaii [Ahahui o na Kaikamahine o Hawaii], this writer [Samuel K. Kekoowai] was introduced to Mrs. J. Swanzy, the leader of this association, and by her kindness I was welcomed to see the walls of that house which is filled with beautiful decorations of the monarchy, and their images hanging from the walls, set up almost like the museum of Kamehameha [Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum].

This group, the Daughters of Hawaii, upholds the name of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani, and her birthday is cherished by them, and the writer observed the commemoration held by the association which holds dear the name placed upon them, the Daughters of Hawaii.

In the story told to me within the house, Kaleleonalani was raised by her hanai guardian [kahu hanai], Dr. Rooke [Kauka Luka], until she married Liholiho Kamehameha 4, however, there is another version that I have been told by another.

On that 20th day of this June, I saw the back room totally filled with those who came, from the members to visitors, and most were whites and there were a few Hawaiians [??? a o-a na Hawaii].

The story of the circuit of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani around Oahu nei was told, beginning at Waimanalo at the place of John Cummins [Keoni Kamaki], and to Kaneohe at the place of Wainui Pii, and then on to Waikane at the place of Kameaaloha; at Kahana there was a Chinese named Apakana, on to Punaluu there was Naili, to Laie at the place of Kupau, to Kahuku at the place of Kaluhi, to Waialua at the place of Kaiaikawaha. Continue reading

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Restoration Anthem, 1843.

The following hymn was sung by various circles on the day of the Restoration; as well as after the Temperance Picnic, given by His Majesty, to Foreign Residents and Naval Officers, (English and American,) at his Country Residence in Nuuanu Valley, August 3d.

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Tune, ‘God Save the King.’

Hail! to our rightful King!
We joyful honors bring
This day to thee!
Long live your Majesty!
Long reign this dynasty!
And for posterity
The sceptre be!

Hail! to the worthy name!
Worthy his Country’s Fame
Thomas, the brave!
Long shall they virtues be,
Shrined in our memory
Who came to set us free,
Quick oe’r the wave!

Hail! to our Heavenly King!
To Thee our Thanks we bring,
Worthy of all;
Loud we thine honors raise!
Loud is our song of praise!
Smile on our future days,
Sovereign of all!

July 31, 1843.  Edwin O. Hall.

[This post may be just a little early this year, but it is good to not just remember momentous events like Ka La Hoihoi Ea just one day of the year. Last year, the Hawaiian Historical Society put up handwritten lyrics of this mele on their Facebook page on the 27th of July. Here we find it in print, just a few days following its being penned by Edwin O. Hall!]

(Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, 8/11/1843, p. 42)

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, Volume I, Number VIII, Page 42. August 11, 1843.

Restoration celebration at Kaniakapupu, 1847.

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The 31st of July, appears to have become a national holyday among the Hawaiians. So far from discouraging its annual observance, we think it should be rather encouraged. A proper recognition of the day will foster a spirit of patriotism. The late anniversary appears to have been partly festive and partly religious. It was so intended.—All classes of our population were invited to a picnic at His Majesty’s summer residence in Nuuanu Valley. Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, great numbers resorted thither; besides pedestrians, several thousands on horse back. Says the Polynesian, “one man hired to count them, commenced early in the day and made out 3,600, going up and 4,600 down—another 1,637 following the King, and 362 straggling. His account was only for part of the day.—The Governor’s computation is 3,000, besides those that come from Koolau.” Suffice it to say, probably a larger company has not been assembled for many years.

Our limits will not allow a detailed account of the animating scenes of the day. A multitude seemed much interested in the spear-exercise and other Hawaiian sports. A sumptuous entertainment was spread for foreigners, while the Hawaiians were served, in a style, that reflected great credit upon His Majesty, the Governor, Paki, John Ii, and others who were directly or indirectly concerned. We can truly remark, that we never witnessed so numerous a gathering, where such perfect order, propriety and regularity were maintained. “There seemed to be a place for every man and every man was in his place.” The following summary of the various dishes served up for the occasion will show that the tables must have groaned under the weight of the viands:—

271 hogs, 482 large calabashes of poi, 602 chickens, 3 oxen, 2 barrels salt pork, 2 of bread, 3,125 salt fish, 1,820 fresh do., 12 1-2 barrels luau and cabbage, 4 do. onions, 18 bunches bananas, 55 pine apples, 10 barrels potatoes, 55 ducks, 82 Turkeys, 2,245 cocoanuts, 4,000 heads of kalo, 180 squid, Grapes and other etcetera, sufficient to feast 12,000 people.

We must not fail to notice one circumstance which was something new for this quarter of the globe. “A coach and four” was a new feature in the procession of a Polynesian chieftain. The Royal party rose in the carriage originally presented by Queen Victoria to her sister Queen, Pomare, but which the latter, in her poverty, was obliged to dispose of by sale. We very much doubt whether any King ever rode through the streets of the capital of his kingdom, when greater order and decorum reigned. To the triumph of Temperance principles among the Hawaiians and foreigners, must be attributed much of the good order that was every where apparent throughout the day.

In the evening, His Majesty, chiefs, foreign officers of government, many of the residents, and numbers of the native population assembled for religious service at the King’s Chapel. A discourse was preached in native and afterwards repeated in English, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong. The singing was good. The sermon of the Mr. Armstrong has already been published in the columns of the Government Organ. We hops it will be read.

[This and the rest of The Friend can be found here at the click of a mouse on the Mission Children Society page!

This celebration is also described in Thrum’s Annual for 1930!]

(Friend, 8/12/1847, p. 117.)

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The Friend, Volume V, Number XV, Page 117. August 12, 1847.