Hanaiakamalama rules, 1916.

RULES REGARDING HOME OF QUEEN EMMA PASSED BY HAWAII DAUGHTERS

Rules and regulations bearing on Hanaiakamalama, the Nuuanu home of the late Queen Emma, were adopted at a meeting on Wednesday of the Daughters of Hawaii, which society now has charge of the home. The rules are as follows:

“1. The object of Hanaiakamalama is to preserve articles formerly owned by the late Queen Emma and such other articles of historic interest as may be give the Daughters of Hawaii for safe keeping.

“2. The building shall be open to visitors daily from 9 to 12 in the morning and from 2 to 4 in the afternoon, excepting Sunday and other days that may be designated.

“3. The house can only be used as a meeting place for the Daughters of Hawaii and cannot be engaged for any other purpose.

“4. A fee of 25 cents will be charged all visitors, members excepted.

“5. Visitors are requested not to handle or deface any article in the building.”

(Star-Bulletin, 10/19/1916, p. 3)

RULES REGARDING HOME OF QUEEN EMMA PASSED BY HAWAII DAUGHTERS

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXIV, Number 7651, Page 3. October 19, 1916.

Samuel K. Kekoowai on the Daughters of Hawaii and Hanaiakamalama, 1923.

HANAIAKAMALAMA

This is a building near the end of the route of the electric car, and it stands on a hill.

As a result of the graciousness of one of the members of the Daughters of Hawaii [Ahahui o na Kaikamahine o Hawaii], this writer [Samuel K. Kekoowai] was introduced to Mrs. J. Swanzy, the leader of this association, and by her kindness I was welcomed to see the walls of that house which is filled with beautiful decorations of the monarchy, and their images hanging from the walls, set up almost like the museum of Kamehameha [Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum].

This group, the Daughters of Hawaii, upholds the name of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani, and her birthday is cherished by them, and the writer observed the commemoration held by the association which holds dear the name placed upon them, the Daughters of Hawaii.

In the story told to me within the house, Kaleleonalani was raised by her hanai guardian [kahu hanai], Dr. Rooke [Kauka Luka], until she married Liholiho Kamehameha 4, however, there is another version that I have been told by another.

On that 20th day of this June, I saw the back room totally filled with those who came, from the members to visitors, and most were whites and there were a few Hawaiians [??? a o-a na Hawaii].

The story of the circuit of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani around Oahu nei was told, beginning at Waimanalo at the place of John Cummins [Keoni Kamaki], and to Kaneohe at the place of Wainui Pii, and then on to Waikane at the place of Kameaaloha; at Kahana there was a Chinese named Apakana, on to Punaluu there was Naili, to Laie at the place of Kupau, to Kahuku at the place of Kaluhi, to Waialua at the place of Kaiaikawaha. Continue reading

Traditional place names and the Daughters of Hawaii, 1918.

OLD HAWAIIAN NAMES TO BE PRESERVED.

This past Wednesday the Daughters of Hawaii [Ahahui o na Kaikamahine] held a meeting at the home of Queen Emma in the uplands of Nuuanu, known by all by the name Hanaiakamalama, the old home of Kamehameha IV and his queen; and at that meeting it was decided that the calling of many places in Honolulu nei by their Hawaiian names will be preserved forever.

To carry out this endeavor, the organization decided to continue calling the name “Leahi,” and not Diamond Head, as it is being called now, and so too with other names that have been changed; they will be returned to their old names that Hawaiians are familiar with.

At that meeting several things were read pertaining to the life of Queen Liliuokalani  by Mrs. Lahilahi Web, a speech by A. F. Knudsen, and Representative Kuhio, along with the singing of some old mele, just as if they were recreating memories of familiar deeds from the time of Queen Emma in that home.

For the treasury of the Red Cross, Mr. A. F. Knudsen will give a speech specifically pertaining to Hawaii nei of the olden days, at Memorial Hall of the Hawaiian Evangelical Association [Papa Hawaii], at eight o’clock on the evening of this Saturday, May 4, under the direction of the Daughters of Hawaii nei.

The entrance will be half price to go and listen to the speech and for all activities that will be put on, and being that it is a benefit for the Red Cross, and that it is beneficial to listen to this history pertaining to the Hawaiian lahui, all the people should go to hear his speech so that the new generations can get some education.

Mr. Knudsen was born on Kauai and went around amongst the Hawaiian children, and met the old people, and listened to the old stories of Hawaii nei; and because of this, the stories he tells that night will be something totally new for Hawaiians of today, the people who know hardly any of the stories of their lahui and their land.

(Kuokoa, 5/3/1918, p. 4)

E MALAMAIA NA INOA HAWAII KAHIKO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 18, Aoao 4. Mei 3, 1918.

More on Queen Emma, Leleonalani, 1866.

Pertaining to Queen Leleonalani.—This past Saturday, our beloved Queen returned to her residence Rooke House, seaside of Kaopuaua; and there many people went to give gifts [hookupu], and give their warm aloha to her. There was great and numerous hookupu given to her. This past Friday, she left the stifling air of town and returned to her Home in the uplands [Hanaiakamalama], where they relaxed to the sweet call of the singing snails [pupukanioe], and her royal husband and their beloved child who left for the dark lands.

[Here is another example where the initial “Ka” or “Ke” in a distinctive name is left off. Whereas Queen Emma is usually known as “Kaleleonalani,” here she is called “Leleonalani.” This works just as long as there is no confusion as to what or who is being referred to.

Kaumualii = Umualii, Kawaiahao = Waiahao, Kamoiliili = Moiliili, &c., &c., &c.]

(Au Okoa, 11/5/1866, p. 2)

No ka Moiwahine Leleonalani.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke II, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Novemaba 5, 1866.

Daughters of Hawaii celebrate 90th birthday of Elizabeth Kekaaniau, 1924.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

Daughters of Hawaii.

The Daughters of Hawaii will hold a reception on Thursday, September 11, 1924, at 4 p. m., at Hanaiakamalama, the Home of Queen Emma, in Nuuanu Valley, to honor the Kaukaualii Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt, for her 90th birthday.

Open to all members of the Association.

BERNICE SPITZ.

Secretary.

(Kuokoa, 9/11/1924, p. 6)

HOOLAHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 37, Aoao 6. Sepatemaba 11, 1924.

Kahili from Washington Place to go to Hanaiakamalama, 1918.

KAHILI TO BE RETURNED TO THE HOME OF EMMA.

Because Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale] will be placed under the care of Governor McCarthy, as a home for him to live in with his family, twenty-six feather standards were returned from Washington Place to the old home of Queen Emma, in the uplands of Nuuanu, under the care of the Association, the Daughters of Hawaii [Na Kaikamahine o Hawaii].

During the funeral of Queen Liliuokalani, and while her body lay in state at Kawaiahao Church and in the throne room of the palace, those kahili were something the public could visit, however, as the result of an agreement between the trustees of Queen Liliuokalani’s estate and the Association of the Daughters of Hawaii, the caring for the kahili has been transferred to the association. As has been the custom from ancient times, it was during the night that kahili of those types were moved from one place to another, and so it was that the kahili were returned in the dark of night on Sunday two weeks ago.

However, because there were not enough people to carry the kahili and march on the roads to its new home where it is hoped to be cared for, the kahili were put on cars and it was on these cars which the people who held the kahili stood.

When the cars and the kahili arrived at the entrance to the yard of the home of Queen Emma in the uplands of Nuuanu, the kahili were taken by the leaders of the Association of the Daughters of Hawaii, and its care was transferred to them.

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1918, p. 2)

HOIHOIIA NA KAHILI MA KA HOME O EMA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 18, 1918.

A public event at Hanaiakamalama, 2013.

Day at Queen Emma Summer Palace

Although the party held 89 years ago was only open to the members of the Daughters of Hawaii, the event this Saturday, October 5, 2013, is open to one and all. Queen Emma Summer Palace is under the care of the Daughters of Hawaii. It seems like it will be a great event with proceeds going to the organization. Let’s give them support for their care of this historic home of Ke Alii Kaleleonalani as well as Hulihee Palace in Kona!!

Check out our various posts on the Daughters of Hawaii!]

Day at Queen Emma Summer Palace

Day at Queen Emma Summer Palace

Daughters of Hawaii and Hanaiakamalama, 1924.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

Na Kaikamahine o Hawaii.

The Daughters of Hawaii will hold a social, this Thursday, September 11, 1924, at 4 p. m., at Hanaiakamalama, the Home of Queen Emma, in Nuuanu Valley, to honor the honorable Kaukaualii Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt, for her 90th birthday.

This is open to all the member of the Association.

BERNICE SPITZ,

Secretary.

(Kuokoa, 9/11/1924, p. 6)

HOOLAHA. Na Kaikamahine o Hawaii.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 37, Aoao 6. Sepatemaba 11, 1924.

More on the Wahiawa “healing stones,” 1927.

THE SUPERNATURAL ROCKS WILL BE LEFT IN THEIR PLACE.

At the meeting of the Daughters of Hawaii last week Wednesday in the Home of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani in Nuuanu, the association decided not to move the “Healing Stones” from where the two stand in Wahiawa; they made no decision to perhaps not move them for a time between three and six months and after that time, to take up again the question of those rocks.

When ayes and nays were asked for per the request explained earlier by Mrs. Julie Judd Swanzy and added to with small changes made by Mrs. F. A. Potter, there were three members who were opposed to the changes.

The decision by the association agreed upon that day, was in accordance with the decision by the President of the Board of Health, F. E. Trotter, that there would be no action upon on the matter of the rocks and that they’d be left where they stand now without being moved. With this decision by the Daughters of Hawaii, the ones who have responsibility over the rocks, dashed was the hope and request of 400 citizens of Wahiawa made to this association in a petition to remove the rocks from Wahiawa.

Another subject considered and decided upon by the association was this: there shall be no monuments built upon heiau. At that meeting, announced were pledges of $588, and cash donations of $1712, and funds of $341.72 for the restoration of that palace in Kailua, Kona, Hawaii [Hulihee].

Because of the rumor that the enthusiasm over the healing powers of the rocks are dwindling, which was known because less people go to worship the stones and because of less donations, this is the reason for the postponement by the association on action to be taken in regard to the rocks, with their belief that perhaps in a short few months the craze of the people over worshiping them will decrease drastically.

At that meeting of the association, there were many letters read by the President, Mrs. Swanzy, in front of the members gathered there, from different people dealing with the stones.

One of these letters was a petition by 400 people of Wahiawa asking to remove these rocks from there; three of the people who signed their names to the document asked that their names not be publicized and to take out their names from the list; there was a letter against the moving of the rocks to the Bishop Museum, where the stones would just be a “Collection” there; in another letter, it was asked to move the rocks to an area near the new road in Koko Head.

Mrs. Charles Clark asked to return these stones to the grounds of Kukaniloko; her idea was opposed by the majority of the members for the reason that the ancient history of these stones have nothing to do with the history dealing with the alii born at Kukaniloko, and therefore, it is not right to move them there. The rocks were moved to Kukaniloko at the order of Galbraith, because he thought they might be broken up where they stood beneath the stream.  The association does not want to return the stones there; they have been something much cared for by the Filipinos and others, and other stones of Kukaniloko have been cracked because of candles placed upon them, and the grounds are full of rotting fruits and flowers; and seeing those things which marred the beauty of the area was why they were moved to where they stand now. Those stones will not be considered again for return to Kukaniloko.

As for the $3000 in the bank, it is from donations made by people who went to worship the stones, but the association has not agreed to take a cent of the money, but it will instead be appropriated for use for works benefiting the people of Wahiawa.

(Kuokoa, 11/24/1927, p. 4)

E WAIHOIA ANA NO NA POHAKU KUPUA MA KO LAUA WAHI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 52, Aoao 4. Novemaba 24, 1927.