Christmas at Washington Place, 1858.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Christmas—passed off in the good old fashioned style. The eve was ushered in by the assemblage, about 7 o’clock, of a large number of children and their parents at Washington Place, the Mansion of Mrs. Dominis, where Santa Claus had given out that he would hold his court, and distribute the gifts which he had ordered for the occasion. A magnificent “Christmas Tree” had been provided in one of the upper chambers, and the little folks, as they gathered about it with sparkling eyes and clattering tongues, found it all lighted up with candles, and the branches bending under the weight of gifts. Prompt as old father Time ever was, the bells were heard at the windows announcing:

“A miniature sleigh with eight tiny reindeer,
With a little old driver so lively and queer.” Continue reading

Kahili from Washington Place to go to Hanaiakamalama, 1918.

KAHILI TO BE RETURNED TO THE HOME OF EMMA.

Because Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale] will be placed under the care of Governor McCarthy, as a home for him to live in with his family, twenty-six feather standards were returned from Washington Place to the old home of Queen Emma, in the uplands of Nuuanu, under the care of the Association, the Daughters of Hawaii [Na Kaikamahine o Hawaii].

During the funeral of Queen Liliuokalani, and while her body lay in state at Kawaiahao Church and in the throne room of the palace, those kahili were something the public could visit, however, as the result of an agreement between the trustees of Queen Liliuokalani’s estate and the Association of the Daughters of Hawaii, the caring for the kahili has been transferred to the association. As has been the custom from ancient times, it was during the night that kahili of those types were moved from one place to another, and so it was that the kahili were returned in the dark of night on Sunday two weeks ago.

However, because there were not enough people to carry the kahili and march on the roads to its new home where it is hoped to be cared for, the kahili were put on cars and it was on these cars which the people who held the kahili stood.

When the cars and the kahili arrived at the entrance to the yard of the home of Queen Emma in the uplands of Nuuanu, the kahili were taken by the leaders of the Association of the Daughters of Hawaii, and its care was transferred to them.

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1918, p. 2)

HOIHOIIA NA KAHILI MA KA HOME O EMA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 18, 1918.

Celebrating Liliu’s 75th birthday, 1913.

LILIU IS 75 YEARS OLD

There Were Many Who Went to Congratulate Her This Tuesday.

This Tuesday past, Queen Liliuokalani was seventy-five years old, and her friends, companions, locals and foreigners visited her at her home at Washington Place to see her, and to give their congratulations to the Queen of Hawaii nei for reaching that old age.

Just like in past years, there was a rush of the citizens of town to see Queen Liliu; it was so in the morning of this Tuesday, and the Queen welcomed warmly all who shook hands with her; it is estimated that their number reached a thousand.

The hours set aside for the public to visit her was from eleven o’clock to twelve o’clock, but there was celebration on the previous Monday night by singing groups with their instruments, as they serenaded the window of the home of the person for whose birthday it was, until the hours when the sun appeared.

After eight o’clock in the morning of that Tuesday, there was also a luau given to celebrate the day, and the royal attendants and a few malihini were invited, and they sat at the table laden with so many good things.

When the time came for the opening of the audience with the public at eleven o’clock of that morning, everyone showed up at Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale], and there too was the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] honoring the one whose birthday it was.

Present was the Honorable Edward K. Lilikalani, where he stood ready to greet the public, and Colonel Iaukea and John Dominis introduced them before Queen Liliu, as the Queen would always give a smile to each and everyone who shook hands with her.

There also was Princess Kawananakoa to assist the Queen, wearing her finery, while the interior of the reception room was decorated with flowers, and feather capes [ahuula], kahili, and everything hearkening back to the past era, the time when this archipelago was governed by Monarchs.

At this audience, there were many Hawaiians who showed their affection for their queen, by kneeling before her and kissing her hand as they were used to doing.

After the audience, the Queen and her attendants got aboard automobiles headed for her seaside home in Waikiki, where a party was prepared and waited for her and the malihini invited to meet with her and to enjoy with her that day.

The Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] was also there following her to Waikiki, to continue to give honor to the table of the queen.

There were several hundreds of invited people that arrived to that party, from kamaaina to malihini, and they all ate until satiated of what was prepared, and they drank to the health and happiness of the mother, with happy thoughts and with hope that the life of Queen Liliu would be extended and that she would have more years to live.

(Kuokoa, 9/5/1913, p. 1)

PIHA NA MAKAHIKI HE 75 IA LILIU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 35, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 5, 1913.

Queen Liliuokalani’s birthday celebrated at Washington Place, 1912.

LILIU’S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED

The Queen Made Seventy-Four This Thursday.

FRIENDS CAME TO SEE HER

Those Who Extended Their Congratulations Were About Eight Hundred.

About eight-hundred or more kamaaina and malihini went on Monday to the home of Queen Liliuokalani, Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale], and gave their congratulations to the former Queen of Hawaii nei, for her reaching seventy-four years in age.

Present was Prince Kalanianaole and Princess Kalanianaole and also Princess Kawananakoa, who were there to assist the Queen in welcoming the visitors on that day.

The Queen’s home was decorated in flowers as was customary on her birthdays in the past and memories were stirred up of days when the alii of Hawaii nei were viewed with majesty in the minds of all Hawaii’s people.

The band was there entertaining the visitors; and from the Queen’s side, to welcome the guests, the responsibility went to Colonel Iaukea, assisted by Mr. Dominis and his aids, E. K. Lilikalani, James Hakuole, and Hiram Kolomoku.

The Queen is still in good health, however she is becoming frail, yet with patience she welcomed all the guests who visited her to extend their congratulations, and delightedly she extended her hand before those with whom she was familiar.

Just as it is with Hawaiians, who show their deference and affection for their royalty, like Liliu; so they did on this day, and this was followed as an example by some of the malihini, who bowed deeply and with affection, showing that the Queen’s position remained the same in the minds of the people even if she is left without her rights in ruling the nation.

Following the audience, each person signed their name in the book set aside for this occasion, and then the crowd left Washington Place for Waikiki where a luau was prepared to celebrate that unforgettable day.

(Kuokoa, 9/6/1912, p. 1)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA HANAU O LILIU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 6, 1912.