Kalakaua, the firemen’s king! 1875.

Burning of the Ship Emerald.—At half-past two o’clock on Monday morning an alarm of fire was sounded by the watchmen in the bell-tower, which proved to be for the ship Emerald, at anchor in the roadstead. Fire brigades, about two hundred officers and men, were immediately dispatched from the Pensacola in port, which took off two or three of the patent fire extinguishers. The city firemen also turned out promptly, with their machines, hose carts and ladders, ready to assist whenever ordered. At early dawn, the ship was towed into the harbor alongside the steamboat wharf, where the firemen and engines could get access to her. The fire was first discovered soon after midnight, but when the naval force reached the ship the hole was so full of smoke that the fire extinguishers could could not be successfully applied, and little could be done towards checking the fire until the engines could be brought to bear on it. From six oʻclock, the firemen, mariners and citizens worked faithfully till after noon, when the fire was apparently subdued, and the firemen returned home. Continue reading

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Response on interview by Jule de Rytiler, 1897.

The ex-Queen has evidently been playing to the gallery and has enlisted in her broken cause some hysterical women. Among these is Julie de Rytiler. This may be a pseudonym, however, for the ever present Julius. He may have changed his sex in print. For mawkish sentiment the interview cannot be beat. When an interviewer writes such stuff as this she insults the lady she is interviewing. The ex-Queen is represented as having read “Aloha Oe” to this double distilled idiot and she writes “I do not know one word of Hawaiian, and yet so feelingly and expressively did this lovely woman read these songs that I felt sure I understoods it all.” It reminds one of the old lady in one of Marryat’s novels, who spoke of the extreme comfort of that “Blessed word Mesopotamia” was to her. The interviewer must be the kind of woman that can get a great deal of comfort out of “Mesopotamia,” or “Aloha Oe.” Hysterical persons like this do harm to the person they wish to do good to and certainly take away from the dignity of the ex-Queen.

(Hawaiian Star, 3/31/1897, p. 4)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume III, Number 1235, Page 4. March 31, 1897.

On the 100th anniversary of the passing of Queen Liliuokalani, 1917-2017.

[Found under: “LILIUOKALANI. A Published Interview With Her.”]

The Hawaiians are my people, and I am still their Queen. To the Hawaiians I shall always be Queen while I am alive, and after I am dead I shall still be their Queen—their dead Queen. But Hawaii is not in the hands of its people. From other countries all kinds of people have come—some wise, some foolish, some good, some very mean. They found fortunes in my county under the protection of my fathers, and then they robbed me of my throne.

[This quote is taken from an interview by Jule de Rytiler originally published in the American Woman’s Home Journal. For the entire interview as published by the Independent, see here.]

(Independent, 4/1/1897, p. 4)

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The Independent, Volume IV, Number 547, Page 4. April 1, 1897.

 

New street names announcement in English, 1856.

[Found under: “By Authority.”]

In Privy Council, Nov. 24, 1856, it was voted “that a copy of the Resolution assigning names to several streets be given to Mr. Hopkins for publication in the Polynesian:”

The Resolution is as follows:—

Resolved, That the new street leading up from Beritania street by the King’s Garden, towards the western side of Punch Bowl Hill, be called Emma Street. Continue reading

Hawaiian Halloween in LA, 1937.

WAIKIKI

Commencing
Saturday, Oct. 30

HAWAIIAN HALLOWE’EN
CELEBRATION–for 7 Days
–as in The Islands!

SOL HOOPII’S Orchestra

LENA MACHADO
PRINCE LEI LANI

ALOHA KAIMI Arrives from Honolulu to Join TANI MARSH in Interpretive Hulas!

NO COVER CHARGE

Hawaiian, Chinese and American
Cuisine — Special

DINNER SATURDAY $2.50
All Other Times $1.50

LA BREA AT BEVERLY               York 8183

Try a Poi Cocktail at “Noa-Noa”

(LA Times, 10/30/1937, p. 5)

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Los Angeles Times, Volume LVI. October 30, 1937, p. 5.

Kauai was ahead of the crowd back in the day! 1888.

[Found under: “LOCAL & GENERAL NEWS.”]

OUR old and esteemed friend Spitz returns to home to Nawiliwili, Kauai, this evening, after a stay of several days in the city. Mr. Spitz takes along a milkshake machine with him, and will hereafter treat the people of Nawiliwili to “shakes.”

[The first mention of milkshake machines in the newspapers seems to occur only a year earlier, in The Decatur Herald (Illinois), on 8/9/1887.]

(Evening Bulletin, 12/13/1888, p. 3)

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The Daily Bulletin, Volume XIII, Number 2121, Page 3. December 13, 1888.

Beverly Noa, sophistication, 1959.

Sophistication is achieved in this classic shirt-sheath in charcoal brown. The fabric is a drip-dry, silk-finished blend. It is worn by Beverly Noa. The dress is belted in the striking new opalescent print, recently introduced by Alfred Shaheen, Limited.

(Star-Bulletin, 9/30/1959, p. 23)

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(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume 48, Number 231, Page 23. September 30, 1959.