Why do we ignore science? 1983.

Volcano alarm sounded, but nobody listened

Clark’s Big Isle

“You may bring a horse to the river, but he will drink when and what he pleaseth.”

—George Herbert, 1640.

HILO.—In early 1975, Drs. Donald Peterson and Donald Mullineaux, volcanologists, issued a report, “Volcanic Hazards on the Island of Hawaii.” If reaction had come in a theater, the audience would have booed.

Peterson was scoffed at by Big Island real estate agents and tourist industry leaders. Mayor Herbert Matayoshi jumped on the bandwagon and castigated the scientists for unduly alarming residents, potential visitors and prospective investors.

As a result, the report was largely ignored. Continue reading

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Experiment of Japanese laborers, 1868.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Arrival of Japanese Emigrants.—The British ship Scioto, Captain Reagan, arrived yesterday, 33 days from Yokohama, Japan, with the first instalment of Japanese laborers, selected and shipped to the Hawaiian Government by its Consul Mr. Van Reed. These laborers are in charge of Dr. D. J. Lee and Mr. A. D. Baum, who have taken special care to preserve the health of the passengers, and they have arrived in excellent condition. Continue reading

More news about the gannenmono, 1868.

The Yaconin [Yakunin].—The Board of Immigration have placed Saburo [Tomisaburo Makino], (the Japanese official who came with the laborers in the Scioto), at school at Punahou. It was a condition imposed by the Tycoon [? shogun], in the permission given to our Consul, Mr. Van Reed, to send the Japanese to these Islands, that a Yaconin should accompany them, and remain until the expiration of their contracts. Saburo, therefore, while clothed by his own Government with a responsibility to look after his countrymen, during their voyage hither, and residence here, now that the laborers are distributed to their various places for work, and the call for his services in the management is infrequent, desires to improve his time in the study of the language and the books of the foreigners among whom his lot is cast for three years. We shall have in Saburo an opportunity to send back to Japan an educated man, acquainted with our ways, customs and country, and hereafter to be of service, we hope, in our father relations with Japan. Continue reading

Japanese laborers, 1868.

Japanese.—Dispatches from Consul Van Reed inform us, that he has engaged and will ship for Honolulu 180 picked Japanese for laborers. Their contracts are for three years are $4.00 per month, found and medical attendance, to be taken to Honolulu and returned at end of contract, free of expense. Continue reading

Clarice Taylor talks of Kilauea place names, 1959.

Clarice B. Taylor’s
Tales about Hawaii

Place Names About Kilauea Crater

Another attempt to destroy Pele and her volcanic fires crops up in a little known legend which comes from the Island of Kauai.

After the death of the Chief Kaha-wali in a lava flow at Puna, Hawaii, the Kauai chiefs determined to make an end to Pele and her antics.

Kauai in those days was famous for having Kahunas (priests) of great spiritual powers. The people of Kauai believed they were strong enough to cope with Pele. So six priests were selected and sent to Hawaii with instructions to go to Kilauea and surround Pele. Continue reading

Publication of “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” 1956.

Hawaiians Were Gourmets When It Came to Fish

By CLARICE TAYLOR

The Hawaiian pitied the white man as an uncultivated person when he first saw the white man eating fish.

The white man discarded the portions of the fish which the Hawaiians considered delicacies—such as the head, the eyes, the entrails, the skin and the little dark portions next to the bone.

Then, too, the white man only ate cooked fish. He had no idea of the choice flavor of fresh fish eaten immediately after taking it from the water.

All this and much more is told in a new publication, Native Use of Fish in Hawaii by Margaret Titcomb, librarian, and Mary Kawena Pukui, associate in Hawaiian Culture at Bishop Museum.

Published in N. Z.

Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a supplement to the Journal of Polynesian Society and was published by the Society in New Zealand.

The books will soon be on sale at the Bishop Museum Bookshop.

Although Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a scientific publication, its text is easy to read for the layman and contains much fascinating material on how the Hawaiian at fish, his major source of protein. Continue reading

Another Leilani Estates ad, 1969.

Invest in a promising area before everybody else does.

Buy Leilani Estates

$100 DOWN ONE ACRE

Honolulu Landing
Nanawale Bay
Makaukiu
Kipu Point
KAPOHO
LEILANI ESTATES
Cape Kumukahi
Kapoho Point
Proposed Marina
Proposed Park Improvement
Isaac Hale Beach Park
POHOIKI
MacKenzie Park
Maikoiko Point
OPIHIKAO
Waipuku Point
Black Sands Beach
Kaimu Park
KALAPANA
Painted Church
Queen’s Bath
Kalapana Park

KALAPANA/POHOIKI RESORT REGION

For $100 down you can invest in a one-acre, fee simple, garden-residential estate at Leilani Estates. Developer-paid electrical power lines will be extended to every lot. County-dedicated roads will be completed within 90 days. Continue reading