Young Hawaiians’ Institute established, 1894.

The Institute.

The entertainment at the Y. M. C. A. Hall last night was a great success. The Young Hawaiians Institute is a most deserving organization. The concert with which the boys inaugurated their club was greatly appreciated and proved the abilities of the members of the new society, and their friends. The following is the list of the officers: Continue reading

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Timoteo Haalilio in the words of William Richards, 1845.

Haalilio was born in 1808, at Koolau, Oahu. His parents were of respectable rank, and much esteemed. His father died while he was quite young, and his widowed mother subsequently married the Governor of Molokai, an island dependent on the Governor of Maui. After his death, she retained the authority of the island, and acted as Governess for the period of some fifteen years. Continue reading

The return of the aloha aina, 1845.

The Montreal, from Boston, arrived off our harbor on Sunday last, at day break.—Her ensign was noticed to be half-mast, and various conjectures began to circulate through the town, when William Richards, Esq., H.H.M.’s Commissioner to the U. States and Europe, whose arrival has been so long and anxiously awaited, landed and proceeded directly to the palace, where he immediately made known to their Majesties the melancholy news of the death of his fellow Commissioner, Mr. T. Haalilio, who died at sea on the 3d Dec. ult. Continue reading

Bilingual democratic ticket, 1910.

TERRITORIAL TICKET

DELEGATE TO CONGRESS:
ELELE:

L. L. McCANDLESS
(Linekona Eliwai)

SENATORS—NA SENATOA:

J. S. KALAKIELA

B. G. RIVENBURGH (Livini)

W. S. EDINGS (Ekini)

E. K. HANAPI

REPRESENTATIVES 4th DISTRICT:
LUNAMAKAAINANA APANA EHA:

SOLOMON MEHEULA

FRED TURRILL (Wela ka Hao)

G. K. KEAWEHAKU (Gaberiel)

E. H. F. WOLTERS (Walaka)

F. C. BENEVEDES (Palakiko)

E. K. RATHBURN

REPRESENTATIVES 5th DISTRICT:
LUNAMAKAAINANA APANA 5:

GUS KALEOHANO

J. K. LUKA

DAVID KUPIHEA

EDWARD LIKE

J. M. POEPOE

SAM KAOHELE Continue reading

Kalaipahoa, and “Hawaiian Art,” 1941.

HAWAII’S WOODEN GODS GOOD POLYNESIAN ART

Huc M. Luquiens Appreciates Carved and Feathered Deities of Ferocious Mien and Lost Symbolism

By LORIN TARR GILL

“If we were forced to choose a single specimen to represent the characteristic art of Polynesia, it might well be one of the extraordinary wooden gods of Hawaii,” Huc Luquiens, assistant professor of art at the University of Hawaii, asserts in his paper on “Hawaiian Art,” soon to be published by the Bishop museum. Continue reading

On Kalaipahoa, 1931.

POISON GOD BURNED

Hilo, Hawaii, July 6, 1931.

Editor, The Star-Bulletin.

Sir: In your issue of July 4, 1931, there appears a picture of an old Hawaiian wooden idol  under which it was stated that it was believed to be the poison-god Kalaipahoa. Continue reading