Death announcement for Zerubabela Kapule, aka Zakaria Kapule, 1923.

Did you see the Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? Here is a obituary for Zerubabela Kapule who was also known as Zakaria [Zachariah].

Obituaries

ZERUBABELA KAPULE

Zerubabela Kapule, retired and pensioned member of the Hawaiian band, died last Thursday evening at his home, Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project at Bishop Museum, 2021.

Did you see the latest Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? It mentions Ka Nūhou, the Hawaiian language newsletter put out by the club, Hui Aloha ʻĀina Tuahine at University of Hawaii at Mānoa. That was 49 years ago! Click here for the Nūhou Monday post from He Aupuni Palapala!

E na makua Hawaiʻi me na kupuna Hawaiʻi

…ʻO ʻoukou no na kumu helu ekahi o ka ʻolelo Hawaiʻi. Ka ʻolelo i aʻo ʻia mai ka puke mai, oʻohe no e like me ka ʻolelo mai koʻoukou waha mai.

Hawaiian parents and grandparents, you are the best teachers of the Hawaiian language.
The language taught from books is not like the language that comes from your mouths.
—A plea written by Haunani Bernardino, editor of Ka Nuhou, an English-Hawaiian newsletter.

Haunani Bernardino

Nuulani Atkins

Lurline Naone

Bill Wilson

By Arlene Lum
Star-Bulletinn Writer

Hawaiian is a living language and NOT a foreign one. And if a group of University of Hawaii students had their way, Hawaiian youngsters would be bilingual.

There are only 5,000 people in the State now who can speak the beautiful, musical language and only 150 at the University are trying to learn.

The reason?

“We were brought up feeling ashamed of our heritage,” according to Nuulani Atkins, a senior in his third year of language study. “I hated myself. I hated the Hawaiians. I felt inferior.” Continue reading

Looking back to the Hawaiian football champions of 1895, 1926.

WINNERS OF FIRST MAINLAND — ISLAND GRID TILT

Here is the Honolulu team, island champions and victors over the Navy champs from Philadelphia. Top row, standing, left to right—Billie Cornwell, Chris Holt, Louis Singer. Continue reading

In less than 10 years Old Oakum is just a character with half a name, 1906.

Old Oakum, a Character in Honolulu Long Ago

“Old Oakum” was one of the odd characters of Honolulu u to about thirty years ago. He was a harmless creature whose one talent was that of collecting honey from bee trees without being stung. Where he came from or was born, or just what his nationality was, were matters not well known, for “Old Oakum” seemed to have forgotten all about himself long before coming to Honolulu which must have been in the early 50s. Continue reading

More on bees and the man known to Hawaiians as Okamu haole, 1897.

An Industry That Has Made Rapid Strides.

It would be a difficult thing to fix the date of the beginning of the bee industry in the Hawaiian Islands. As far back as the “oldest inhabitant” can run his thoughts, honey has been gathered in the mountains. Back in the ’60s one of the characters of the city was Dwight Holcomb, known to the small boys and natives as “Old Oakum.” He was an eccentric individual and was the “bogie man” to the young boys of that time. Continue reading

Death of Dwight Holcomb, 1877.

Death of “Oakum.”—The half crazy vagrant who has for years been well-known in and about Honolulu by the name of Oakum, died at the Insane Asylum on Monday morning last, where he has been for some months, suffering from aneurism. His real name was Dwight Holcomb, he was about 50 years of age, Continue reading

Did Oliver Knox Poniaulani and Emily Poniaulani get married twice? 1920.

[Found under: “MARRIAGE LICENSES”]

PONIAULANI-PONIAULANI—Oliver Knox Poniaulani, 50; and Mrs. Emily Poniaulani,46; both of Kuau. Ceremony by Rev. Moses Kahiapo

(Maui News, 6/9/1920, p. 1)

Maui News, Twentieth Year, Number 1034, Page 1. June 6, 1920.

Duke Kahanamoku at the Lei Day celebration at Honolulu Hale, 1948.

SHERIFF DUKE P. KAHANAMOKU and Pacific Queen Nola Rose were greeted enthusiastically by the audience at the city hall Lei Day observance. Wearing a lei, hibiscus in her hair and a colorful print dress, the Australian blonde was a contrasting, yet harmonious note, in the ensemble of color and gaiety at the city hall.—Star-Bulletin photos.

(Star-Bulletin, 5/3/1948,  p. 11)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume LIV, Number 17356, Page 11. May 3, 1948.

More on the kii from Waialua, 1866.

Hawaiian Idol.—A genuine idol of the olden time, has recently been discovered at Waialua, Oahu, by Mr. Lane. Through the permission of His Excellency ex-Governor Kekuanaoa, this idol has been presented to the Museum of Oahu College [Punahou]. It is about eight feet in length, and resembles the ancient images represented in Jarvis’ History. Mr. Chase has had this idol sketched by Mr. Emmert, and very soon photographs will be on exhibition. Many hundreds of Hawaiians have gathered to see this huge image while it was set up in front of the Kuokoa office, at the Sailors’ Home, Honolulu. Continue reading