Will Rogers and Hawaiian independence, 1932.

ROGERS SAYS LET HAWAII ISLES ALONE

(Special Star-Bulletin Wireless)

SANTA MONICA, Cal., May 2.—Well, about all you can see in the papers is Honolulu. The whole thing just proves that the islands haven’t got any use for the navy and the mainland.

Of course, I guess I am all wet, but I never have seen any reason why the U. S. or any nation should hold under subjection of any kind any islands or country outside of our own. Continue reading

More on Aunty Elizabeth from Bishop Museum’s post today, 1959.

‘Aunty Elizabeth,’ Kalakaua Ave. Lei-Seller, Dies

Another familiar face in the fast-changing Waikiki scenery passed from view Saturday with the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hoopii Delovio—”Aunty Elizabeth” to thousands.

The 54-year-old woman and two others were the first to set up a lei stand in Waikiki some 35 years ago. Continue reading

More on the prayer of Rev. Akaiko Akana, 1920.

An Official Prayer From Hawaii

PROCEEDINGS of the House of Representatives were opened the other day by the Rev. Akaiko Akana, chaplain of the Senate of Hawaii, in a prayer of rather unusual character. He quoted Kipling and referred to ancient nations which, before the discovery of this country, “had risen skyward in the splendor of their accomplishment and in the glory of their might, but because God was forgotten, they fell and today the remnants of their broken structures lie heaped upon the ruins of their desolation with their names buried beneath and spelled in cold letters on the pages of history.” This is a fine piece of rhetoric addressed to the Throne on High, but intended for human ears, and it evokes many memories of the Western world. Continue reading

Passing of Benjamin Nalaeelua Kahalepuna, 1937.

B. N. Kahalepuna Called By Death

Was 25 Years In Employ Of Territory

Benjamin N. Kahalepuna, 58, died Monday at his home at 2310 Pauoa road after a brief illness. He was born at Kaneohe, Oahu, September 7, 1879, and had served in the territorial government for more than 25 years.

He was appointed to the bureau of conveyances in 1898 and two years later served as a school teacher. In 1907 he was appointed to a position in the sheriff’s office under Col. Curtis P. Iaukea, and was later given the position of sergeant of police under W. P. Jarrett. Continue reading

Kamehameha School’s first Founder’s Day held in gymnasium at 3:30 p.m., December 19, 1888.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

First Celebration of Founder’s Day—Interesting Exercises.

There was a fair gathering at the Kamehameha School on Wednesday afternoon, the occasion being the first observance of Founder’s Day, the birthday anniversary of the late Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop, by whose munificent bequest the institution was founded. The exercises were held in the gymnasium and the following invited guests were present: H. R. H. Princess Liliuokalani attended by Mrs. J. O. Carter, Hon. C. R. Bishop, Rev. C. M. Hyde, D. D., and Mrs. Hyde, Rev. E. G. Beckwith, D. D., Rev. W. C. Merritt and Mrs. Merritt, Lieut. Crawford, U. S. N., Mrs. W. B. Oleson, Hon. W. F. Allen and Mrs. Allen, Hon. H. M. Whitney, Capt. Bourke, R. N., Capt. Acland, R. N., Major-General Cunliffe, R. A., Hon. S. M. Damon, Mr. W. W. Hall and Mrs. Hall, Prof. M. M. Scott and Mrs. Scott, Mr. J. H. Paty and Mrs. Paty, Mrs. J. U. Kawainui, Mrs. Napoliona, Prof. W. D. Alexander, Mr. C. M. Cooke and Mrs. Cooke, Mrs. Hartwell, Mr. T. G. Gribble and Mrs. Gribble, Mrs. Whitman, and a few others. Continue reading