Death of David Kailihiwa, 1922.

DAVID KAILIHIWA

David Kailihiwa of 1017 Kawaiahao street died at his home at 3:15 o’clock last Tuesday, pneumonia being the cause of death. Services will be held next Sunday afternoon at Silva’s mortuary chapel, Kukui, near Nuuanu street, interment to be in the South King street Catholic cemetery.* Kailihiwa, who was a municipal employe in the garbage department, was married, and was born on March 3, 1861, in South Kona, Hawaii, being 61 years, 9 months and 23 days old at the time of his death. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Sarah Akau Kailihiwa.

*It is interesting that this cemetery is no longer known by its old name, Koula Cemetery [Pa Ilina o Koula].

[A Hawaiian announcement was posted earlier. It included an image of David Kailihiwa. See the post by clicking this link.]

(Advertiser, 12/28/1922, p. 7)

Honolulu Advertiser, 64th Year, Number 12,508, Page 7. December 28, 1922.

Medical school for young Hawaiians, 1870.

Kahunas.

We understand that one of our physicians, who is thoroughly conversant with the native language, has been authorized to form a class of eight or ten Hawaiian young men, (graduates of the highest schools,) for instruction in the principles and practice of medicine.

There has never been made, that we are aware of, any systematic or earnest effort to instruct Hawaiian youth in the medical art. The knowledge that is necessary to be acquired to make a skillful and thoroughly competent practitioner is not to be obtained in this country, which as yet, does not possess medical schools and colleges, and the difficulties in the way of sending Hawaiian pupils abroad to obtain a medical education, are so various and insurmountable, as almost to preclude any hope of being overcome. Continue reading

Death of Clarence William Kinney, 1942.

Isle Composer Dies; Aged 63

Clarence W. Kinney Victim of Heart Attack

Clarence W. Kinney, 63, died of a heart attack at the home of his son, Clarence P. Kinney, 1133 First Avenue, late Saturday afternoon. The body will be on view at the Borthwick Mortuary after 9 a. m. Monday. Funeral services will be conducted by William Waddoups of the Latter Day Saints at 2:30 o’clock, burial in Diamond Head cemetery. Continue reading

Names of Maori visitors, 1920.

MEMBERS OF PARTY OF VISITING MAORIS

Wiremu “William” Duncan and wife of Dannevirke, New Zealand. He will go with President Lambert to Salt Lake City shortly. He is a manufacturer of cheese and his product took first prize in London in competition with the world.

Eriata Nopera and wife of Dannevirke, New Zealand, a wealthy sheep owner. Continue reading

“Nohea” and “Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona” being performed, 1920.

Band Concert

The Hawaiian Band will give a concert at 3 o’clock this afternoon in Kapiolani Park, the program for the occasion being the following:

Old Hundred

March—United Liberty, Losey
(a) Mystery, Johnson
(b) Starlight Love, Denni
Song—That Wonderful Mother of Mine, Gooding
Overture—William Tell, Rossini
Songs—Band Glee Club
(a) Nuuanu Waipuna, Major Kealakai
(b) Nohea, Queen Liliu
(c) Uluhua, Robert
(d) Ko Ua kilihune o kona [Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona], Queen Liliu
Clarinet Solo—Somnambula, Thornton
Waltz—Jolly Fellows, Vollstedt
Intermezzo—Elegante, Offenbach
March—Bright Eyes, Hoschna
Hawaii Ponoi
The Star Spangled Banner

(PCA, 12/12/1920, p. 3)

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume LXIII, Number 12170, Page 3. December 12, 1920.

Death of Edward Kawaihoa Hanapi, 1930.

Edward Hanapi, Veteran County Employe, Dead

Following an illness of two years, Edward Kawaihoa Hanapi, 59, veteran county employe, died at the Queen’s hospital last night. Although ill for a long period, he was not confined to the hospital until during the last week.

Born on Molokai December 7, 1870, Hanapi would have been 60 years old next Saturday. Hanapi wad educated in the Kamehameha Schools and for many years was employed by the City and County as a record searcher. His friends in Honolulu and on the other islands are legion. Continue reading

Queen Liliuokalani’s composition not credited here in original or translation, 1867.

Hawaiian Music.—It is something to hear of Hawaiians, who but a few years ago, as a nation, possessed no other songs but the semi-barbarous Meles of their ancestors, and no other music than the montonous “ah—ah,——o—oo—u—uu,” of former years,—it is something pleasingly new to have to note the appearance of a neatly lithographed sheet of music for sale in the bookstore, both the words and music of which were composed by a Hawaiian lady. The title describes the sentiments expressed in the composition—”He Mele Lahui Hawaii,” or, in English, “A Hawaiian National Hymn.” Continue reading