Kiaaina dies at 105 years old, 1922.

105 YEARS OLD, ANSWERS CALL

Funeral Services Held at Honolii For Kiaaina, of the High Rank; Old Age Brings Grim Reaper

MOURNED DEATH OF PRINCE

Continuous Failing in Health is Noted Since Sudden Death of the Late Delegate Kuhio

Kiaaina, descendant from Hawaiian chiefs of highest rank, at the age of 105 years, died at his Honolii home yesterday afternoon at 5 o’clock. Up to almost the last moments of his life Kiaaina retained full and unimpaired mental faculties. His end came quietly, gradually and from the natural decline of old age. It is said of his that he continued in good health up to the time of the death of Prince Kuhio, but since hearing of the loss of his beloved Prince the old man failed physically and began fading away in bodily strength. A niece and grand-daughter were with him at the time of his demise. Continue reading

Simeon Kiaaina Nuuhiwa and Lalani Village, 1932.

HAWAIIAN ARCHITECTURE

Kiaaina Nuuhiwa, 68, completing the heiau, or  temple, which is one of seven huts now being built for the Hawaiian village at Waikiki. Native gods will be enshrined here.—Star-Bulletin photo. Continue reading

The passing of Simeon Kiaaina Nuuhiwa, 1937.

S. Nuuhiwa, Famed Kauai Cowboy, Dies

SIMEON KIAAINA NUUHIWA

One more tie with the Islands’ colorful past was cut last week when 69-year-old Simeon Kiaaina Nuuhiwa, white-bearded old time cowboy of Kauai, died here. Continue reading

Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat. 1897.

STRANGLING HANDS UPON A NATION’S THROAT.

[This is the famous article by Miriam Michelson who went to Hilo and wrote of an anti-annexation petition drive held there.]

(San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3.)

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-2/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/

Koloa, and more on Kaauhelemoa, 1871.

Duck-Shooting on Oahu.—For a country where the occupation of the sportsman is so little followed as here, those who do occasionally spend a day in its pursuit are amply rewarded by the sight of the many beauties of nature of our island. The wild duck is peculiar in its habits, and loves to haunt the lonely solitudes of the mountain fastnesses during the daytime, coming down at night to visit the streams, the taro-patches and the sea-shore for food. One of these noted haunts of the wild duck, which is very seldom visited and never has been described in print, lies far up in the bosom of the mountains, at the head of Palolo valley. Continue reading

Continuation of Theodore Kelsey’s lament, 1948.

A Hawaiian Lament
By THEODORE KELSEY
II

A little seaward of this forbidden domain the face of the father valley-ridge is sadly disfigured by a large quarrying scar, obliterating the interesting light-colored formation of Ka Upena a Maui—Demi-god Maui’s Fishnet.

Continuing down the road a short distance we come to the place where, on the upper side, the large sacred rock of Kane-hoa-lani has been split up. Continue reading