Hawaii news from 1837.

From the Sandwich Islands.—We have received a file of the Sandwich Island Gazette to March 11. The Gazette contains a recommendation to the inhabitants of the island to erect a monument to the memory of Captain Cook, at Hawaii, on the spot on which he was killed. The Gazette of Feb. 25, announces the marriage, by Mr. Bingham of Kauikeauli [Kauikeaouli], King of the Sandwich Islands, to Kalama, daughter of Naihekukui. Continue reading

News of Kapoina Dandridge heading back to Hawaii, 1900.

FORTUNE

For Colored Woman.

Will Go to Sandwich Islands.

Disappearance of a Barberton Man. [unrelated story]

(Special Correspondence.)

Barberton, Oct. 5.—Mrs. Smith Dandridge, an estimable colored lady, who formerly resided here, until a year ago, and also in Akron, has gone to the Sandwich Islands to obtain a fortune, which has been willed to her. Continue reading

George Makalena and others with the Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show want to come home, 1899.

Hawaiian Rough Riders

Four of the Hawaiians who were with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show are at San Francisco rooming in a big building opposite the Occidental on Montgomery. The boys, who hope to get off for home by Manoa, are: K. Nakea, Hoapili, Kipi and Makalena. Continue reading

John Kulia Mokumaia holds party for Buffalo Bill’s sister, 1928.

POI LUNCHEON GIVEN—J. K. Mokumaia was host recently at a poi luncheon at his home in Moanalua in honor of Mrs. Julia Cody Goodman, sister of the late Col. William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill). Front row, seated, Mrs. Walter Goodman, Mrs. Abbie M. Andrus of Los Angeles, and Mrs. Samuel R. Damon. Middle row, seated, Mrs. Goodman and Mrs. Lahilahi Webb. Back row, George Makalina [George Makalena], J. K. Mokumaia, Walter Goodman and Samuel R. Damon.—Bert G. Covell photo.

(Star-Bulletin, 8/4/1928, p. 10)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXXVI, Number 11415, Page 10. August 4, 1928.

Julia Cody Goodman, sister of Buffalo Bill, arrives, 1928.

BUFFALO BILL’S SISTER TO BE HONORED HERE

Honoring Mrs. Julia Cody Goodman, sister of the late William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill), a program of Hawaiian dances, songs and ceremonies, is being given this afternoon at the home of W. F. Goodman, 2680 Kaaipu Ave., a son of Mrs. Goodman.

Mrs. Goodman arrived in Honolulu last Saturday for a visit with her son. She is 85 but still active.

The program for today was arranged by J. K. Mokumaia, foreman of the capitol building force, who was a member of the famous Buffalo Bill show during a mainland tour in 1898. There were seven Hawaiians in the company at that time, of whom two survive.

(Star-Bulletin, 6/22/1928, p. 1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXXV, Number 11,378, Page 1. June 22, 1928.

Return of Margaret Kapoina (Maggnett) Dandridge after more than 40 years! 1901.

BACK TO HAWAII NEI AFTER OVER FORTY YEARS ABSENCE

MR. AND MRS. DANDRIDGE.

FOURTY YEARS away from Hawaii and now returned, is the story of Mrs. Dandridge given below:

Mr. and Mrs. Dandridge arrived in Honolulu on the Sierra two weeks ago. Mrs. Dandridge is a Hawaiian and forty years ago, when about twelve years of age, she was taken to the States by Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Lewers, her parents being dead at the time. Her native name is Kapoina. Continue reading

Educator Mrs. Clara M. Mokumaia retires, 1940.

Mrs. Mokumaia Will Retire After 35 Years as Teacher

By MAY DAY LO

Mrs. Clara M. Mokumaia, principal of Kaloaloa school, was busy checking upon details for a Boy Scouts’ party when we found her for an interview. The sandwiches were being made, cookies were baked and 10 gallons of punch had been ordered. She had put some flowers in the school auditorium to spruce it up a bit for the party.

She had had a busy school day but she was going to return in the evening to make sure that her Boy Scouts had a good time.

“I’m strong for Boy Scout work,” she explained. “Some people object to the Scouts using the school buildings because they might damage them a little but I would rather have better boys than beautiful buildings. It is more than important to have a boy’s life clean and fit.” Continue reading

Passing of J. K. Mokumaia covered in D.C. paper, 1929.

“TWO-GUN” MOKUMAIA, HAWAIIAN GUARD, DEAD

Toured U. S. and Europe as Cowboy and Crack Shot With Buffalo Bill’s Show.

“Two-Gun” Mokumaia, a picturesque character of Honolulu, is dead. He was widely known in Hawaii, and during the last few years, as foreman of the Capitol grounds, he made friends with hundreds of tourist visitors. In his youth Mokumaia, says the San Francisco Chronicle, was a paniolo (cowboy) and became so proficient as a horseman, roper and crack shot that he joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, touring the United States and Europe as a Hawaiian cowboy. Continue reading

Special public schools for only English-speaking children? 1920.

MacCAUGHEY GIVES FAVORABLE OPINION OF SPECIAL SCHOOLS

Superintendent Recommends Establishment of Three Institutions For English-Speaking Children

Within a year or so Honolulu will have three schools primarily for English-speaking children, if recommendations made by Vaughan MacCaughey, superintendent of public instruction, are adopted by the department, and, since the law permits such schools, no objection is expected.

A committee of parents, representing some 400 English-speaking children, petitioned a recent meeting of the school board for the establishment of a school or schools for such children. The superintendent was authorized to investigate and submit a report and recommendations. Continue reading