First Kamehameha Song Contest, 1921.

KAMEHAMEHA BOYS TO SING TONIGHT FOR CUP TROPHY

A large silver loving cup, the George Alanson Andrus trophy, will be presented tonight as the prize at the first annual interclass singing competition of the Kamehameha Boys’ School. the contest will be on the steps of Bishop museum and will be open to the public. Chester G. Livingston will be chairman of the judges, but other judges will not be known until after the contest. Continue reading

Advertisements

Joseph Kaiponohea Aea, 1901.

—It is expected that our first and nearest insular possession in the Pacific—the Sandwich Islands—will soon have a representative in the Military Academy at West Point,  in the person of Mr. Joseph Kaiponohea Aea. Mr. Aea is a young man of eighteen years, a pure-blood Hawaiian native. Continue reading

Mali leo, 1893.

Equal Rights Under America.

Editor Bulletin:—

The P. C. A. [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] and Liberal are giving us a duet about the benefits we will derive from annexation. The music is very sweet, but I for one am inclined to be sceptical and want a whole ton of salt with their literary effusions. I can see where owners of Government bonds and water front lots on Pearl Harbor will get the benefits of annexation, but the planters and natives—to use a slang expression—their benefits are out of sight, the planters lose everything and get nothing, and I would like to ask the editor of the Liberal (for the P. C. A. man knows nothing about it), what grounds he has for thinking the kanaka will be any better treated than the Indian or Negro. Continue reading

New royal pew at Kawaiahao Church, 1891.

Royal Pew at Kawaiahao Church.

About thirty Hawaiian ladies met at 10:30 o’clock Monday, March 9, at the Kawaiahao church for the purpose of discussing the idea of raising subscriptions for a new Royal pew in that old historical building. The meeting was presided over by Mrs. A. Haalelea, Continue reading

Latest from Maui, 1882.

MAUI.

Work has been commenced on the new wharf at Maalaea. Thirteen piles have been driven in.


The weather is fine on Maui, and very welcomed after the long rains. Most of the mills are running to their full capacity.


At East Maui Seminary, on Tuesday, March 7th, Charles K. Kahai was married to Kele Nueka. The decorations were fine, the entertainment splendid, and a large crowd. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. T. H. Rouse, assisted by William P. Alexander.


The Makawao foreign church has just put in a $250 new organ. They have also voted their pastor a three months’ vacation. He will visit the States and attend the commencement at Amherst College, where he has a son who graduates in June.


A society for literary and religious improvement was successfully formed at Makawao, on Monday the 6th. A lecture on Constantinople was read by our traveled friend, S. T. Alexander. A report on China and its missions by Rev. J. M. Alexander. Readings, recitations, and music filled up the evening. Monthly meetings will be held. The resources of home talent will be tested.


The King’s visit to Paia last Monday was a very pleasant affair. He was received at the depot with warm words of welcome by Judge Mossman. The Norwegian band escorted him to the fine house of Kapoola which was beautifully decorated. Dinner was spread under a large lanai. After dinner the Rev. Mr. Rouse addressed the King in behalf of the foreign residents; to which he responded and also made an address to the natives. The crowd was  large and enthusiastic. The Paia school under Mr. Crooks and daughter paid their respects to His Majesty, sang some of their school songs, and made a very creditable appearance. In the evening the train returned the King and attendants to Wailuku.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 3/15/1882, p. 4)

HawaiianGazette_3_15_1882_4

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XVIII, Number 11, Page 4. February 15, 1882.