Why did Dr. Matthew Makalua not return? 1894.

Doctor M. Makalua.

In a fit of what the Advertiser terms generosity, the councils yesterday voted the sum of $400 for the return passage of Dr. Makalua. It is not at all clear that the offer of this paltry pittance towards his expenses out will induce Doctor Makalua to quit a country and people where the shade of a man’s skin is no more social barrier than the color of his hair or eyes. The Advertiser is generous in suggesting a second-class passage for the “kanaka” in perference to a steerage one, but how about his wife; daughter of a Colonel of the British Army and their children.

Doctor Makalua has attained high distinction in his profession and moves in the best society, and is possessed of means sufficient to come out and return. For the peace of mind of himself and wife we would advise him to remain in England; but memory dwells fondly over ones birthplace, and his countrymen want him among them; Mr. Damon, also, who at the risk of offending the crowd of medicos who constitute about a tenth of the foreign population is resolved to tempt Dr. Makalua to come.

The Advertiser never raised a howl over the expenses—which ran into thousands—incurred in bringing Dr. Arning, Lutz and others out here, and in the case of these two gentlemen named, the causes which led to their departure were eminently discreditable to the Advertiser party, and injurious to the credit of the country.

[Click here. Find out about why Dr. Matthew Makalua said he did not come home to Hawaii nei.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 6/1/1894, p. 2)

HawaiiHolomua_6_1_1894_2.png

Hawaii Holomua, Volume III, Number 128, Page 2. June 1, 1894.

Advertisements

They will eventually bite the hand that fed them, 1862.

Palmam qui Meruit Ferat.

Yesterday (Friday) afternoon, at 4 1-2 o’clock, the Honolulu Rifles turned out for a full dress parade. After marching through several streets the corps halted on the Esplanade, fronting Fort street, when His Majesty the King, accompanied by H. R. H. the Prince of Hawaii, Continue reading

La Hoihoi Ea, 1865.

Restoration Day.

Monday last, the 31st July, was the twenty-second Anniversary of the Restoration of the Hawaiian Flag by Rear Admiral Thomas, and as such was celebrated with becoming joyousness.

The day opened warm and sultry, but by nine o’clock the trades set in and before noon were blowing half a gale. Continue reading

Death of Dr. Beratz / Dr. Beraz, 1872.

Melancholy Death of Dr. Beraz.—By the arrival yesterday of the Nettie Merrill from Lahaina, intelligence was received of the finding on Tuesday morning last, of the dead body of Dr. H. Beraz, a much esteemed German physician residing on East Maui, under circumstances that indicate that he was either drowned in crossing the gulch of Kapia, orthat he had met with foul play.  A letter from an intelligent native, Mr. Aholo, relates the following circumstances: Continue reading

Meanwhile, the president of the USA is echoing words from the past, 1942.

OUST THE JAPS

We are rapidly getting all of the 500,000 Japanese away from our Pacific coast danger zone, but what about the timewhen the war is over?

A resident from the Lake Labish district told the editor of the Greater Oregon yesterday of a series of raids conducted on Jap farms in that district. We are not at liberty to tell the full story but we can say that many machine guns were found in hay mows and in straw stacks and that a large amount of ammunition and weapons was taken from the Japs, who profess to be so friendly to us and so sorry that Japan has declared war upon us. Continue reading