Kamehameha II and Kamamalu return aboard the British ship Blonde on May 4, 1825.

Remembrances.

On the 22nd of May in the year 1824, King Liholiho and his attendants landed in Portsmouth, England. On the 26th [of May] of that same year, Kaumualii, the King of Kauai, died at Honolulu, and Lahaina is where he was buried. Continue reading

More on the prayer of Rev. Akaiko Akana, 1920.

An Official Prayer From Hawaii

PROCEEDINGS of the House of Representatives were opened the other day by the Rev. Akaiko Akana, chaplain of the Senate of Hawaii, in a prayer of rather unusual character. He quoted Kipling and referred to ancient nations which, before the discovery of this country, “had risen skyward in the splendor of their accomplishment and in the glory of their might, but because God was forgotten, they fell and today the remnants of their broken structures lie heaped upon the ruins of their desolation with their names buried beneath and spelled in cold letters on the pages of history.” This is a fine piece of rhetoric addressed to the Throne on High, but intended for human ears, and it evokes many memories of the Western world. Continue reading

Ohia forests, 1920.

THE OHIA FOREST OF KOHALA

“Thousands of dollars worth of ohia trees in the district of Kohala, Hawaii, will be destroyed in five years if there is nothing done to save that forest,” reported Representative Uluihi on Monday, one of the members of the committee of the house of representatives who went with some of the members of his committee to Kohala to see the state of the forests of Kohala. Continue reading

Death of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1936.

THAT GREATLY BELOVED MATRIARCH DIES

MRS. EMMA NAWAHI LEAVES THIS LIFE
SHE WAS LIVING DEBILITATED FOR A LONG TIME AND PASSED AWAY

HILO, Hawaii, Dec. 28.—In the famous history of Hawaii nei, the name Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi will be seen and known, from when there was hair upon figure, when the town of Hilo was very young, and the trains joined the two sides of Hamakua and Puna; at 6:30 this morning she left behind this life, and Leleiwi crossed its hands behinds its back, and the earth was left the earth’s, and His to Him.

At 2 in the afternoon on this coming Sunday, her funeral will be held at her home. After the funeral her body will be cremated and her ashes buried at the cemetery at Homelani.

She left behind one son, Alexander Nawahi of Hilo and three grandchildren.

When Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi left this life, undone were the memories of the days when the alii of the land were living from this time of the new government. Mrs. Nawahi was a matriarch well known among the alii families of Hawaii nei, for her intelligence and for her becoming a leader for the lahui in those days when politics was strong, and her home in Hilo became the home of homes, the home that welcomed everyone and a place for travellers to rest.

She was part Chines, and her father was Tong Yee, and he was the very first Chinese to start growing sugarcane on the island of Hawaii, and her mother was Kahole-aua.

It was her father who first planted sugarcane on the land of Paukaa, and the first mill build on the island of Hawaii. Thereafter he entered into a partnership with John Ena Sr.

Mrs. Nawahi’s husband was the Hon. Joseph K. Nawahi, a member of the legislature of Hawaii nei for 20 years or more, and he was one of the political pillars who appointed Lunalilo as King for Hawaii nei. Mr. Nawahi was a powerful force opposing annexation, and in the year 1895 he established the Hawaiian Newspaper called “Ke Aloha Aina,” to express his political views.

Mrs. Nawahi was a member of the organizations Daughters of Hawaii, Kaahumanu Society, Hale o na Alii, Ahahui o na Wahine ma Hilo, a member of the Haili Church in Hilo, and so too of the American Red Cross.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 1/16/1936, p. 4)

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke VIII, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Ianuali 16, 1936.

More on the importing of birds and plants and laborers, 1865.

Planters’ Society.

A general meeting of the Society was held at the Court House on Saturday last, April 1st, 1865, pursuant to a call published by his Ex. R. C. Wyllie.

Mr. Montgomery was called to the Chair, and stated that the objects of the meeting were, first, to consider the amalgamation of the Planters’ Society with the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society.

Hon. G. M. Robertson, appointed at a former meeting to report on the proposed step, stated that the simplest way for attaining the object was for the members of the Planters’ Society to unite individually with the R. H. A. Society. Continue reading

On rice birds in Punaluu, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Hiohiona o Koolauloa.”]

Pertaining to Punaluu.—This is rice farming lands for Chulan & Co. There is much rice in this land; there is much rice as well amongst the Hawaiians in Waiono, Makana, Puheemiki, Kapano, and Papaakoko; Continue reading

Electric lights unveiled here in Hawaii nei, 1886.

DEDICATION OF ELECTRIC LIGHTS

This past Wednesday night, Honolulu’s crowd came out parading in droves, approximately 7,000 strong, to check out the first time the six electric lights which we made known the other day were lit, under the organization and expense of Mr. C. O. Berger, and those who assisted him to install this type of new electricity to this land, but which is regularly known to some other places in the world. Continue reading

The Prince of Hawaii, 1860.

The birthday of Ka Haku o Hawaii.

That is this 20th of May, and it is being moved to the 21st; it will be a day of celebration, and therefore the Legislature will be postponed to the 23rd of May.

[The celebration was held on the following day because the 20th fell on a Sunday that year.]

(Hae Hawaii, 5/16/1860, p. 28)

HaeHawaii_5_16_1860_28.png

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 5, Ano Hou—Helu 7, Aoao 28. Mei 16, 1860.