John Lot Kaulukou, what an exciting life, 1917.

JUDGE JOHN L. KAULUKOU PASSES ON.

After a sickness of a few weeks ago, Judge John L. Kaulukou grew weary of this life, in the hospital at Kealakekua, on this past Saturday, and Judge Kaulukou was laid to rest for all times at his land of birth.

He was in the hospital for an entire month [??? ka noho ana o aku o kona kino lepo maka ilina,] because of a pain in his leg, under the medical care of Dr. H. L. Ross, the government doctor there; and the knowledge of the doctor could not save his life, until he left this world on that day indicated above.

The Judge left behind his widow, Mrs. Susie Kaulukou, and three sons, Abraham G. Kaulukou, the secretary of Kauai County; Lot Kalani Kaulukou, known also as Lot Sebastian, famed for dancing and living in lands afar; and John L. Kaulukou Jr; along with a large family and many friends, grieving with regret for him.

His Birth

Judge John L. Kaulukou was born at Keauhou, North Kona, Hawaii, on the 1st of June, in the year 1841, therefore, he lived for sixty-seven years and a day, before he left this life of hardships. His father was a Spaniard [Paniolo] and his wife was a Hawaiian, therefore he is also called a hapa Paniolo.

In the younger days of Judge Kaulukou’s life, he was orphaned by his parents leaving this life early, so the responsibility transferred upon his grandfather to educate him; the first step taken to raise him until he became an important giant of the land in the days of the monarchy of Hawaii nei. Continue reading

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Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

Abraham Kaulukou to study law at Yale, 1902.

LEAVING TO STUDY LAW IN AMERICA.

ABERAHAMA KAULUKOU HEADED FOR YALE UNIVERSITY—ASSISTED BY THE ALUMNI OF YALE.

In the coming September, Aberehama Kaulukou, the son of the Hon. John L. Kaulukou will go to enter into the school of law at Yale. This is help from the Yale alumni of this town. These former students thought a great deal to do something for their school, and after prior investigation, they unanimously chose to send this intelligent Hawaiian youth of the land. Continue reading

Kaulia’s invitation to Morgan, 1897.

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

ANTI-ANNEXATIONIST LEADER SIGNS INVITATION.

Says His People are Anxious to Learn From the Veteran Senator What Annexation Would Mean to Them.

Senator Morgan has accepted the invitation of the native Hawaiians to address them in public meeting upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States.

Among the signers of the invitation is James K. Kaulia, president of the Hawaiian Patriotic League and president of the Aloha Aina Society. Mr. Kaulia is bitterly opposed to annexation and he is at the head of the opposition among his own countrymen. It was Mr. Kaulia who was largely instrumental in getting a few Hawaiians to gather in an abortive mass meeting at the Union Square last month, and adopt the resolutions protesting against annexation which Mr. Kaulia afterwards at the head of a committee of fifteen presented to President Dole and his Cabinet.

Mr. Kaulia states that he as well as the members of the societies he represents are anxious to hear Senator Morgan and they are truly grateful to him that he has consented to speak.

The invitation sent to the Senator, as well as the signers, is a follows:

“Honolulu, Sept. 24, 1897.

“To Senator John T. Morgan, City:

“We the undersigned native Hawaiians desire very much to hear you in an address upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States and particularly desire your views as to the condition of the native Hawaiians and the position they would occupy under closer political relations with the United States.

“We therefore invite you to deliver a public address to the Hawaiians in this city at your convenience upon the above subjects, and if you accept, will make all necessary provisions for the holding of the meeting.

“Yours very respectfully,

“D. L. NAONE,
“J. KALUA KAHOOKANO,
“J. M. POEPOE,
“R. W. WILCOX,
“JOHN LOT KAULUKOU,
“JAMES K. KAULIA,
“President Hawaiian Patriotic League and President Aloha Aina Society.
“S. M. KAAUKAI.”

The meeting will be held on Thursday evening, at the Opera House, and Senator Morgan states that he will treat the question to the best of his ability.

(Hawaiian Star, 9/28/1897, p. 1)

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

The Hawaiian Star, Volume IV, Number 1386, Page 1. September 28, 1897.

Looking back at their time spent at Lahainaluna, 1904.

TEARS SHED FOR THE DAYS GONE BY.

Being that some of the old students educated at Lahainaluna College are involved in this water rights case, Mr. McDonald, the principal of Lahainaluna, gave a small party for the old students of the school.

Amongst those who attended were the Hon. J. L. Kaulukou, T. He-u, students who graduated in 1854; D. Kailua, a student who gradutated in 1858; Hon. D. Damiana, a student who graduated in 1857; Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, from the side of the Government; and some other people.

After the stomachs were filled, the graduates were called up to talk about their life at the school, and as a result of the words of these people, much tears were shed because of the great troubles faced in search of education in those days gone by.

According to one of the graduates, his clothes in those days of hardship was just two pants, two palaka, a hat, and no shoes. Another said that he had just one shirt and no other, none at all. Being that there was much food planted on the school property by the students, fish was the relish, the oopu that were caught in the rivers, and the luau.

Currently, the principal is thinking about going back to the work done in the schools in days past, those of Lahainaluna have placed their hope upon him, that he will have this famous saying go on.—”Ka ipukukui pio ole i ka Makani Kauaula.”¹

¹The famous epithet for Lahainaluna School: “The light not extinguished by the Kauaula winds.”

(Kuokoa, 5/13/1904, p. 5)

KULU NA WAIMAKA NO NA LA I HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 13, 1904.

Kahikina Kelekona, John G. M. Sheldon, editor of the Hawaii Holomua, arrested for speaking, 1893.

LIBERTY OF THE SUBJECT.

Has Anybody Any Rights Under the Provisional Government?

Argument of the Question in the Circuit Court.

John G. M. Sheldon, editor of the Holomua, who is deprived of his liberty under a warrant issued by the President of the Provisional Government, was produced in the First Circuit Court before Judge Frear, at 11 o’clock this forenoon, under a writ of habeas corpus. Attorney-General Smith and F. M. Hatch appeared for the Government, and C. W. Ashford, C. Creighton, A. Rosa and J. L. Kaulukou for the prisoner.

Mr. C. W. Ashford argued for the discharge of the prisoner, speaking to the following effect: There was no authority vested in the Executive and Advisory Councils to issue warrants of arrest. President Dole had no right in the Proclamation of the Provisional Government to issue a warrant of arrest. The Government could not go behind that proclamation, he presumed. “We the People of the Hawaiian Islands” gave him no such power. If “We the People of the Hawaiian Islands” had intended to exercise that power they would have given it to him. The Proclamation stated that the President’s duties were to preside over the meetings of the Executive Council. Mr. Dole now holds no judicial position in these islands. He did hold such position before, but resigned it to become President of the Provisional Government. If that warrant, of President Dole was valid, then there was no security of liberty for any man, woman or child under these tropic skies. There was then nothing to prevent any resident of this country being consigned to a dungeon or bound in irons. It should be known whether the Provisional Government had such tremendous powers. He was not making a covert attack on the late revolution. He believed in the sacred right of revolution, and he considered the late revolution was a good thing. But it might not be good if the Provisional Government introduced anarchy and despotism. Some persons were led by their philosophy to believe that a beneficent despotism was the best form of government, and he believed that members of this school of philosophy had seats in the Advisory Council. Continue reading