Emma Kaili Metcalf Beckley Nakuina, 1847-1929.

END COMES TO MRS. NAKUINA

Was First Woman Judge Under U. S. Flag; Daughter of Hawaiian Chiefess

The first woman to be a judge in Hawaii under the American flag, Mrs. Emma Kaili Metcalf Beckley Nakuina died early today at the home of her son, Fred Beckley, in Kaimuki. She was born March 5, 1847, in Manoa valley, Oahu, the daughter of Theophilus Metcalf, a sugar planter, and Kaili Kapuolono, chiefess of Kukaniloko. Continue reading

Advertisements

Octopus fishing and more described by Emma Metcalf Beckley, 1902.

HOW NATIVES ONCE FISHED

Women Got the Octopus With Spears.

The Hawaiians have five methods of fishing: by spearing, hand catching, baskets, hook and line, and with nets.

The Ia O is the spearing of fish and is of two kinds, below and above water. That below water is the most important, and is generally employed for the different kinds of rock fish. The spear used by the diver is a slender stick of from 6 to 7 feet in length made of very hard wood and sharply pointed at one end, but more tapering at the other. Since the possession of iron, spears are always tipped with it, but perfectly smooth, without hook or barb. Diving to a well-known station by a large coral rock or against the steep face of the reefs, the diver places himself in a half crouching position on his left foot, with his right foot free and extended behind, his left hand holding on to the rock to steady himself, watches and waits for the fish. Fish in only two positions are noticed by him, those passing before and parallel to him, and those coming straight towards his face. he always aims a little in advance, as, by the time the fish is struck, its motion has carried it so far forward that it will be hit on the gills or middle of the body and thus secured, but if the spear were aimed at the body it would be very apt to hit the tail, or pass behind. When the fish is hit, the force of the blow generally carries the spear right through to the hand, thus bringing the fish up to the lower part or handle of the spear, where it remains whilst the fisherman strikes rapidly at other fish in succession should they come in a huakai (train) as they usually do. Continue reading

Emma Nakuina tells the story of Hiiaka, 1883.

HIIAKA.

A Hawaiian Legend by a Hawaiian Native. A Legend of the Goddess Pele, Her Lover Lohiau and her Sister Hiiakaikapoliopele.

The crater of Kilauea on Hawaii, is the residence of the Goddess Pele. She had eight sisters, all called Hiiaka, with some distinguishing ending, as Hiiaka-noholae, (Hiiaka living on the headland), Hiiaka-wawahilani, (Hiiaka the heaven breaker,) Hiiakaikapoliopele, (Hiiaka in Pele’s heart) etc. The latter commonly called the Hiiaka is the heroine of this legend. Pele had also several brothers Kamohoalii, Lonomakua, Lonoonolii, etc.

All her brothers and sisters were subordinate to her, but Kamohoalii was her favorite brother and Hiiakaikapoliopele the favorite sister. Tradition is not very explicit as to the source of Kamohoalii’s power, but he has always been regarded as the very sacred royal brother of Pele. The brothers and sisters seem to have had great respect foreach other and never trespassed on one another’s privileges, or interfered with each other ‘s actions. Uwekahuna the high bluff of the crater walls beyond the sulphur banks is supposed to contain a large cave, his dwelling, and the bluff is known as “Ka-pali-kapu-o-Kamohoalii” (the tabu cliffs of Kamohoalii.) Smoke from volcanic fires has never been known to be blown against them. True believers stoutly insist that smoke could never by any possibility bend or be blown against it, as that would be a gross violation of the royal privileges of the sacred brother. Continue reading

Emma Nakuina educates teachers on Hawaiian history, 1920.

HAWAIIAN STORIES PRESENTED BEFORE THE TEACHERS’ SCHOOL.

In the syllabus of the School of Education this year, beginning on this past Wednesday, were old moolelo of Hawaii nei. And it is Mrs. Emma M. Nakuina who is teaching them before those who come to the teachers’ school during the time set aside for her course.

These below are the moolelo that she will be teaching:

1. Our ties with the Maori of New Zealand.

2. The religion or superstition of the Hawaiians, and along with those beliefs are things relating to Pele and her younger sisters and Hiiaka, along with her brothers.

3. Short stories which show amazing beliefs, like the story of “Kaauhelemoa,” the chicken god of the crater of Palolo and the story of “Akaka Waterfall,” which is close to the head of the Kolekole River in Hilo Paliku.

4. The story of “The Kapa-Beating Woman” of Honohina, the mother of the chiefly child. That child grew up to become one of the strong and skilled warriors of his time. The story of “Elena [Eleau?] and Eleao.”

5. The moolelo of “Lonoikamakahiki” and his association with Capt. Cook.

6. The moolelo of “Umi-a-Liloa,” one of the famous alii of old Hawaii nei.

7. The birth, the important things, and accomplishments of Kamehameha I.

8. The usual activities recalled by Hawaiians in the time of Kamehameha I as well as during my childhood.

9. The major entertainments of Hawaiians.

(Kuokoa, 7/9/1920, p. 4)

HE MAU MOOLELO HAWAII IMUA O KE KULA KUMU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 4. Iulai 9, 1920.

Looking back at their time spent at Lahainaluna, 1904.

TEARS SHED FOR THE DAYS GONE BY.

Being that some of the old students educated at Lahainaluna College are involved in this water rights case, Mr. McDonald, the principal of Lahainaluna, gave a small party for the old students of the school.

Amongst those who attended were the Hon. J. L. Kaulukou, T. He-u, students who graduated in 1854; D. Kailua, a student who gradutated in 1858; Hon. D. Damiana, a student who graduated in 1857; Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, from the side of the Government; and some other people.

After the stomachs were filled, the graduates were called up to talk about their life at the school, and as a result of the words of these people, much tears were shed because of the great troubles faced in search of education in those days gone by.

According to one of the graduates, his clothes in those days of hardship was just two pants, two palaka, a hat, and no shoes. Another said that he had just one shirt and no other, none at all. Being that there was much food planted on the school property by the students, fish was the relish, the oopu that were caught in the rivers, and the luau.

Currently, the principal is thinking about going back to the work done in the schools in days past, those of Lahainaluna have placed their hope upon him, that he will have this famous saying go on.—”Ka ipukukui pio ole i ka Makani Kauaula.”¹

¹The famous epithet for Lahainaluna School: “The light not extinguished by the Kauaula winds.”

(Kuokoa, 5/13/1904, p. 5)

KULU NA WAIMAKA NO NA LA I HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 13, 1904.

More on Emma Nakuina, W. T. Brigham, and the Bishop Museum, 1897.

NOT COURTEOUS

Treatment of Ladies at Bishop Museum.

An Open Protest to the Trustees of the Kamehameha Schools.

MR. EDITOR:—The undersigned with three other ladies, Hawaiians of the highest respectabily, standing and position, with five little children, were sitting this morning in the shade of the Kamehameha Museum enjoying the fine showing made by the naval men drilling on the College campus. Chairs had been offered by a Kamehameha graduate, he placing them on the grass plot adjoining the Museum. After a little while, Mr. Brigham, the curator of the Museum, drove by within a few feet of us. He scowled most savagely at us. In a few minutes a Portuguese workman came to order us away from the place.

As it has invariably been the custom to throw the College grounds open to the public when any sort of a public or semi-public show is taking place within its precincts, we did not pay any attention to his orders, thinking it a piece of officiousness on the part of an ignorant person, and the man went away. After a while the man re-appeared and ordered us off again, saying he was acting by Brigham’s orders, and to use force if necessary. He took hold of the chair of the wife of a prominent official and tipped it partly over. She sprang up to avoid a fall, as did two other ladies. I, being at the very corner of the building and a little in advance of the others did not perceive the man until he had taken hold of my chair and had partly spilled me on my knee. I turned around to protest, when he grabbed my arm and pulled me out of my chair, saying “you get out of this, those are my orders from Mr. Brigham. If you don’t go yourself, I make you go. Mr. Brigham don’t allow any one to get on this grass.”

There were quite a number of carriages standing around, occupied by spectators of the drill.

The actions of the Portuguese were so rough and insulting that the attention of quite a number were attracted to our forcible ejectment. Continue reading

Emma Metcalf Nakuina affronted, 1897.

Contemptuous Act Against Women.

Being that the parading was being held in the uplands of the Kamehameha School for Boys, on the plains of Kaiwiula, Mrs. Emma Metcalf Nakuina went attended by Mrs. R. W. Maea [Mrs. Rudolph William Meyer] of Kalae, Molokai and two of her daughters, Mrs. Mutch and Mrs. Hitchcock. They went and sat in a calm and shady place at the Bishop Museum, atop a area covered with manienie grass, and the son of the one named first, F. W. Kahapula Beckley, brought them chairs. Continue reading