The beginning of Mary Kawena Pukui & Margaret Titcomb’s list of sea creatures, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

Here below is a list of names of some Hawaiian sea creatures that are written down in a book of names of the Kamehameha Museum.

The director of the Museum wrote that if some of our oldsters can write down the names and descriptions of the fishes.

That director wrote that he will pay the cost of one year’s subscription to the newspaper Ka Hoku o Hawaii, if he receives some fish names and a description of them, like if it is long, or striped, and so forth.

Here below is a list of names of some fishes sent in by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui and Mrs. Makalika Titcomb [Margaret Titcomb]. Continue reading

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Speaking of fishes, here is a list of fish names put out by Margaret Titcomb, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Below is a list of names of some Hawaiian fishes that are written in a book of names at the Kamehameha Museum [Bishop Museum]. Continue reading

Titcomb’s list of fishes, 1940.

TO THOSE WHO KNOW THE NAMES OF FISHES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Here below is a list of names of some fishes of Hawaii nei that are found in the book of names in the Kamehameha Museum [Hale Hoikeike o Kamehameha].

akaka, akeke, akiki, akilolo, aku; variety, —aku kina’u, akule; also called aku-a (?), akupa, alaihi, alaihi kalaloa or kakaloa or kahaloa, alaihi lakea, alaihi mahu, alaihi maoli, alalana, alalauwa, alamo’o, alea, aleihi, aloalo, alo’ilo’i, alukaluka, ama’ama, pua ama’ama; pua ama; pua kahaha, ama’ama, anae, amo’omo’o, amuka; puakahala, ananalu, a-niho-loa, aoaonui, apahu, api, apoha, apu’upu’u, a’u, a’u kaku; kupala, a’u kuau-lepa, a’u lepe (iheihe; auki), a’u papaohe, aua’a auae, aualaliha, aua’u; ahaaha, auau ki, auki, auku, awa; awa-aua; awa-awa, awalo, awala; awela; awela, aweoweo.

e, e’a, eheula, ehu, enenue, hahalalu, halalua, ha hilu (?), hahili, haie’a, hailipo, halahala, halaloa, hahalua, hanaui; mokumokuhanui, haoma, hapuu, hapuupuu, hauliuli puhi, heahaaha, hihimanu; lupe, hilu, hilu eleele, hilu lauwili, hilu melemele, hilu pano, hilu pilikoa, hilu ula, hilu uli, hinalea, hinalea akilolo, hinalea eleele, hinalea iiwi, hinalea lauwili, hinalea lipoa, hinalea lolo, hinalea luahine, hinalea nukuiwi, hinalea nukuiwi-ula, hinalea nukuiwi-uli, hinalea nukuloa eleele, hinalea nukunuku loa, hinalea mananalo; ananalo, hinana, hi’ukole, hi’u-ula, hoana, hololua, hou huhune.

[This was the beginning of a series of lists of fish names appearing in the Hoku o Hawaii, and running until it seems like August 28, 1940.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/5/1940, p. 2)

I NA POE I PAA KA INOA O NA I'A LIKE OLE AME KO LAKOU ANO

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 6, Aoao 3. Iune 5, 1940.

Fishes, Margaret Titcomb, and the Bishop Museum, 1940.

A LETTER

May 25, 1940.

Mr. J. B. Dixon, Circulation Manager,
Ka Hoku O Hawaii,
P. O. Box 1004
Hilo, Hawaii, T. H.

My Dear Mr. Dixon,

I am pleased to hear that you are willing to entertain with aloha my clarification of the publishing of a list of fish names and your running it complimentary on your part. Enclosed is my check for the total of $2.¹

I believe that it would be a fine thing to publish it in portions each week. You and Mr. Anakalea have the ability to edit this kind of thing, and to throw out the bait upon the water.

I am looking at the list of fish names that we have, they are found in various collections, and they are not edited completely. Therefore, I will send the remainder of the list of fish names.

Happy thoughts and good wishes on your Commemorative Anniversary Edition and with hopes that this will be printed before the 11th of June, it will perhaps be something beneficial.

Yours truly,

Margaret Titcomb
Librarian.

[This is no doubt a precursor to the publication Margaret Titcomb did with Mary Kawena Pukui, “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” first published in 1952 as Memoir 29 of the Polynesian Society, Wellington, New Zealand. It is currently available in book form from University of Hawaii Press.]

¹It is interesting to note that the cost (prepaid) for a year’s subscription of the Hoku o Hawaii was only $2.00. This is the same cost as a year’s subscription for the Hoku o ka Pakipika and the Nupepa Kuokoa in 1861!

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/5/1940, p. 2)

HE LEKA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 6, Aoao 3. Iune 5, 1940.

More on Emma Nakuina, W. T. Brigham, and the Bishop Museum, 1897.

NOT COURTEOUS

Treatment of Ladies at Bishop Museum.

An Open Protest to the Trustees of the Kamehameha Schools.

MR. EDITOR:—The undersigned with three other ladies, Hawaiians of the highest respectabily, standing and position, with five little children, were sitting this morning in the shade of the Kamehameha Museum enjoying the fine showing made by the naval men drilling on the College campus. Chairs had been offered by a Kamehameha graduate, he placing them on the grass plot adjoining the Museum. After a little while, Mr. Brigham, the curator of the Museum, drove by within a few feet of us. He scowled most savagely at us. In a few minutes a Portuguese workman came to order us away from the place.

As it has invariably been the custom to throw the College grounds open to the public when any sort of a public or semi-public show is taking place within its precincts, we did not pay any attention to his orders, thinking it a piece of officiousness on the part of an ignorant person, and the man went away. After a while the man re-appeared and ordered us off again, saying he was acting by Brigham’s orders, and to use force if necessary. He took hold of the chair of the wife of a prominent official and tipped it partly over. She sprang up to avoid a fall, as did two other ladies. I, being at the very corner of the building and a little in advance of the others did not perceive the man until he had taken hold of my chair and had partly spilled me on my knee. I turned around to protest, when he grabbed my arm and pulled me out of my chair, saying “you get out of this, those are my orders from Mr. Brigham. If you don’t go yourself, I make you go. Mr. Brigham don’t allow any one to get on this grass.”

There were quite a number of carriages standing around, occupied by spectators of the drill.

The actions of the Portuguese were so rough and insulting that the attention of quite a number were attracted to our forcible ejectment. Continue reading

Congratulations Waikiki Aquarium, 110 years old! 1904 / 2014.

HOME OF THE FISHES IS OPENED

A Place to Learn and Enjoy for the Visitors.

AN EFFORT BY HONOLULU’S WEALTHY FOR THE BENEFIT OF EVERYONE.

On the Saturday of this past week, the Aquarium of Hawaii, which stands in Waikiki, makai of Kapiolani Park opened for viewing. This opening was not an opening for the general public, but it was for just those who were invited to come see. This Sunday is when it will be open to the public.

Earlier, it was reported in the columns of the Kilohana¹ that a home will be built where Hawaii’s fishes will be kept, and in the end, the report has come true as the building was entered by the invited guests and will be entered by Honolulu’s people on Sunday.

Many years ago, there was a thought to build an aquarium in Honolulu nei, and Dr. Dorn was the one to come up with the idea; however, because the Government held back some of the resources, this idea by the doctor was dropped and it slept quietly until it was revived by the Rapid Transit Company [Hui Kaauwila]. This idea was considered seriously by this group, when Mr. James Castle [Kimo Kakela] and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cooke stepped in and encouraged the effort.

Mr. James Castle gave a portion of the land of Kapiolani Park, which he held in lease, as a place to build this home. When Mr. C. M. Cooke and his wife joined in this effort, that is when the Rapid Transit Company realized that their dream that they were dreaming would come true, and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cooke graciously gave the money for the construction. Therefore, the Rapid Transit Company was left to collect Hawaii’s fishes for the aquarium, and that is how the aquarium here on Oahu came to be.

This is seen in the great lands all over the world, and its importance is recognized. One of the benefits is that knowledge is gained by those studying the life of fish, and this is taught at universities. And some thousands of people graduate, being educated in where various ocean fishes live, like whales, sharks, the fishes of the ocean floor, and outside of those, the small fishes of the sea shore.

At the aquarium of Hawaii mentioned above are the many fishes of Hawaii; the ocean fishes are separated from the fresh-water fishes, and according to the visitors who went to see this new place and who have seen the displays of the Foreign Lands, …

¹From the subtitle of the Kuokoa Newspaper: “Ke Kilohana Pookela no ka Lahui Hawaii” [The Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation]

[Go check out the Waikiki Aquarium today, Saturday, 3/22/2014! The 110th anniversary celebration continues with fun for the entire family! $1.10 admission to the Waikiki Aquarium all day! Activities include: the Great Marine Chalk Art Draw and Kids Doodle Zone, entertainment by the UH Rainbow Marching Band, Rainbow Dancers, and other guests groups, a special performance of the musical “Honu by the Sea,” free giveaways (while supplies last), LEGO build area, samples from Pepsi, educational and entertaining activities and much more!]

(Kuokoa, 3/25/1904, p. 1) Continue reading