Publication of “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” 1956.

Hawaiians Were Gourmets When It Came to Fish

By CLARICE TAYLOR

The Hawaiian pitied the white man as an uncultivated person when he first saw the white man eating fish.

The white man discarded the portions of the fish which the Hawaiians considered delicacies—such as the head, the eyes, the entrails, the skin and the little dark portions next to the bone.

Then, too, the white man only ate cooked fish. He had no idea of the choice flavor of fresh fish eaten immediately after taking it from the water.

All this and much more is told in a new publication, Native Use of Fish in Hawaii by Margaret Titcomb, librarian, and Mary Kawena Pukui, associate in Hawaiian Culture at Bishop Museum.

Published in N. Z.

Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a supplement to the Journal of Polynesian Society and was published by the Society in New Zealand.

The books will soon be on sale at the Bishop Museum Bookshop.

Although Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a scientific publication, its text is easy to read for the layman and contains much fascinating material on how the Hawaiian at fish, his major source of protein. Continue reading

The beginning of Mary Kawena Pukui & Margaret Titcomb’s list of sea creatures, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

Here below is a list of names of some Hawaiian sea creatures that are written down in a book of names of the Kamehameha Museum.

The director of the Museum wrote that if some of our oldsters can write down the names and descriptions of the fishes.

That director wrote that he will pay the cost of one year’s subscription to the newspaper Ka Hoku o Hawaii, if he receives some fish names and a description of them, like if it is long, or striped, and so forth.

Here below is a list of names of some fishes sent in by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui and Mrs. Makalika Titcomb [Margaret Titcomb]. Continue reading

Speaking of fishes, here is a list of fish names put out by Margaret Titcomb, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Below is a list of names of some Hawaiian fishes that are written in a book of names at the Kamehameha Museum [Bishop Museum]. Continue reading

More on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.

ADDING TO MRS. LAHILAHI WEBB’S STORY OF WAIPAHU

Editor The Advertiser:

May I add a little to Lahilahi Webb’s story of Waipahu.

On Tuesday Miss Titcomb took Lahilahi Webb and me to interview Mrs. Kapeka Baker, one of the two remaining old timers of that locality. Continue reading

Titcomb’s list of fishes, 1940.

TO THOSE WHO KNOW THE NAMES OF FISHES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Here below is a list of names of some fishes of Hawaii nei that are found in the book of names in the Kamehameha Museum [Hale Hoikeike o Kamehameha].

akaka, akeke, akiki, akilolo, aku; variety, —aku kina’u, akule; also called aku-a (?), akupa, alaihi, alaihi kalaloa or kakaloa or kahaloa, alaihi lakea, alaihi mahu, alaihi maoli, alalana, alalauwa, alamo’o, alea, aleihi, aloalo, alo’ilo’i, alukaluka, ama’ama, pua ama’ama; pua ama; pua kahaha, ama’ama, anae, amo’omo’o, amuka; puakahala, ananalu, a-niho-loa, aoaonui, apahu, api, apoha, apu’upu’u, a’u, a’u kaku; kupala, a’u kuau-lepa, a’u lepe (iheihe; auki), a’u papaohe, aua’a auae, aualaliha, aua’u; ahaaha, auau ki, auki, auku, awa; awa-aua; awa-awa, awalo, awala; awela; awela, aweoweo.

e, e’a, eheula, ehu, enenue, hahalalu, halalua, ha hilu (?), hahili, haie’a, hailipo, halahala, halaloa, hahalua, hanaui; mokumokuhanui, haoma, hapuu, hapuupuu, hauliuli puhi, heahaaha, hihimanu; lupe, hilu, hilu eleele, hilu lauwili, hilu melemele, hilu pano, hilu pilikoa, hilu ula, hilu uli, hinalea, hinalea akilolo, hinalea eleele, hinalea iiwi, hinalea lauwili, hinalea lipoa, hinalea lolo, hinalea luahine, hinalea nukuiwi, hinalea nukuiwi-ula, hinalea nukuiwi-uli, hinalea nukuloa eleele, hinalea nukunuku loa, hinalea mananalo; ananalo, hinana, hi’ukole, hi’u-ula, hoana, hololua, hou huhune.

[This was the beginning of a series of lists of fish names appearing in the Hoku o Hawaii, and running until it seems like August 28, 1940.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/5/1940, p. 2)

I NA POE I PAA KA INOA O NA I'A LIKE OLE AME KO LAKOU ANO

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 6, Aoao 3. Iune 5, 1940.

Fishes, Margaret Titcomb, and the Bishop Museum, 1940.

A LETTER

May 25, 1940.

Mr. J. B. Dixon, Circulation Manager,
Ka Hoku O Hawaii,
P. O. Box 1004
Hilo, Hawaii, T. H.

My Dear Mr. Dixon,

I am pleased to hear that you are willing to entertain with aloha my clarification of the publishing of a list of fish names and your running it complimentary on your part. Enclosed is my check for the total of $2.¹

I believe that it would be a fine thing to publish it in portions each week. You and Mr. Anakalea have the ability to edit this kind of thing, and to throw out the bait upon the water.

I am looking at the list of fish names that we have, they are found in various collections, and they are not edited completely. Therefore, I will send the remainder of the list of fish names.

Happy thoughts and good wishes on your Commemorative Anniversary Edition and with hopes that this will be printed before the 11th of June, it will perhaps be something beneficial.

Yours truly,

Margaret Titcomb
Librarian.

[This is no doubt a precursor to the publication Margaret Titcomb did with Mary Kawena Pukui, “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” first published in 1952 as Memoir 29 of the Polynesian Society, Wellington, New Zealand. It is currently available in book form from University of Hawaii Press.]

¹It is interesting to note that the cost (prepaid) for a year’s subscription of the Hoku o Hawaii was only $2.00. This is the same cost as a year’s subscription for the Hoku o ka Pakipika and the Nupepa Kuokoa in 1861!

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/5/1940, p. 2)

HE LEKA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 6, Aoao 3. Iune 5, 1940.