Speaking of fishes, here is a list of fish names put out by Margaret Titcomb, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Below is a list of names of some Hawaiian fishes that are written in a book of names at the Kamehameha Museum [Bishop Museum]. Continue reading

Titcomb’s list of fishes, 1940.

TO THOSE WHO KNOW THE NAMES OF FISHES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Here below is a list of names of some fishes of Hawaii nei that are found in the book of names in the Kamehameha Museum [Hale Hoikeike o Kamehameha].

akaka, akeke, akiki, akilolo, aku; variety, —aku kina’u, akule; also called aku-a (?), akupa, alaihi, alaihi kalaloa or kakaloa or kahaloa, alaihi lakea, alaihi mahu, alaihi maoli, alalana, alalauwa, alamo’o, alea, aleihi, aloalo, alo’ilo’i, alukaluka, ama’ama, pua ama’ama; pua ama; pua kahaha, ama’ama, anae, amo’omo’o, amuka; puakahala, ananalu, a-niho-loa, aoaonui, apahu, api, apoha, apu’upu’u, a’u, a’u kaku; kupala, a’u kuau-lepa, a’u lepe (iheihe; auki), a’u papaohe, aua’a auae, aualaliha, aua’u; ahaaha, auau ki, auki, auku, awa; awa-aua; awa-awa, awalo, awala; awela; awela, aweoweo.

e, e’a, eheula, ehu, enenue, hahalalu, halalua, ha hilu (?), hahili, haie’a, hailipo, halahala, halaloa, hahalua, hanaui; mokumokuhanui, haoma, hapuu, hapuupuu, hauliuli puhi, heahaaha, hihimanu; lupe, hilu, hilu eleele, hilu lauwili, hilu melemele, hilu pano, hilu pilikoa, hilu ula, hilu uli, hinalea, hinalea akilolo, hinalea eleele, hinalea iiwi, hinalea lauwili, hinalea lipoa, hinalea lolo, hinalea luahine, hinalea nukuiwi, hinalea nukuiwi-ula, hinalea nukuiwi-uli, hinalea nukuloa eleele, hinalea nukunuku loa, hinalea mananalo; ananalo, hinana, hi’ukole, hi’u-ula, hoana, hololua, hou huhune.

[This was the beginning of a series of lists of fish names appearing in the Hoku o Hawaii, and running until it seems like August 28, 1940.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/5/1940, p. 2)

I NA POE I PAA KA INOA O NA I'A LIKE OLE AME KO LAKOU ANO

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 6, Aoao 3. Iune 5, 1940.

Fishes, Margaret Titcomb, and the Bishop Museum, 1940.

A LETTER

May 25, 1940.

Mr. J. B. Dixon, Circulation Manager,
Ka Hoku O Hawaii,
P. O. Box 1004
Hilo, Hawaii, T. H.

My Dear Mr. Dixon,

I am pleased to hear that you are willing to entertain with aloha my clarification of the publishing of a list of fish names and your running it complimentary on your part. Enclosed is my check for the total of $2.¹

I believe that it would be a fine thing to publish it in portions each week. You and Mr. Anakalea have the ability to edit this kind of thing, and to throw out the bait upon the water.

I am looking at the list of fish names that we have, they are found in various collections, and they are not edited completely. Therefore, I will send the remainder of the list of fish names.

Happy thoughts and good wishes on your Commemorative Anniversary Edition and with hopes that this will be printed before the 11th of June, it will perhaps be something beneficial.

Yours truly,

Margaret Titcomb
Librarian.

[This is no doubt a precursor to the publication Margaret Titcomb did with Mary Kawena Pukui, “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” first published in 1952 as Memoir 29 of the Polynesian Society, Wellington, New Zealand. It is currently available in book form from University of Hawaii Press.]

¹It is interesting to note that the cost (prepaid) for a year’s subscription of the Hoku o Hawaii was only $2.00. This is the same cost as a year’s subscription for the Hoku o ka Pakipika and the Nupepa Kuokoa in 1861!

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/5/1940, p. 2)

HE LEKA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 6, Aoao 3. Iune 5, 1940.

Congratulations Waikiki Aquarium, 110 years old! 1904 / 2014.

HOME OF THE FISHES IS OPENED

A Place to Learn and Enjoy for the Visitors.

AN EFFORT BY HONOLULU’S WEALTHY FOR THE BENEFIT OF EVERYONE.

On the Saturday of this past week, the Aquarium of Hawaii, which stands in Waikiki, makai of Kapiolani Park opened for viewing. This opening was not an opening for the general public, but it was for just those who were invited to come see. This Sunday is when it will be open to the public.

Earlier, it was reported in the columns of the Kilohana¹ that a home will be built where Hawaii’s fishes will be kept, and in the end, the report has come true as the building was entered by the invited guests and will be entered by Honolulu’s people on Sunday.

Many years ago, there was a thought to build an aquarium in Honolulu nei, and Dr. Dorn was the one to come up with the idea; however, because the Government held back some of the resources, this idea by the doctor was dropped and it slept quietly until it was revived by the Rapid Transit Company [Hui Kaauwila]. This idea was considered seriously by this group, when Mr. James Castle [Kimo Kakela] and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cooke stepped in and encouraged the effort.

Mr. James Castle gave a portion of the land of Kapiolani Park, which he held in lease, as a place to build this home. When Mr. C. M. Cooke and his wife joined in this effort, that is when the Rapid Transit Company realized that their dream that they were dreaming would come true, and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cooke graciously gave the money for the construction. Therefore, the Rapid Transit Company was left to collect Hawaii’s fishes for the aquarium, and that is how the aquarium here on Oahu came to be.

This is seen in the great lands all over the world, and its importance is recognized. One of the benefits is that knowledge is gained by those studying the life of fish, and this is taught at universities. And some thousands of people graduate, being educated in where various ocean fishes live, like whales, sharks, the fishes of the ocean floor, and outside of those, the small fishes of the sea shore.

At the aquarium of Hawaii mentioned above are the many fishes of Hawaii; the ocean fishes are separated from the fresh-water fishes, and according to the visitors who went to see this new place and who have seen the displays of the Foreign Lands, …

¹From the subtitle of the Kuokoa Newspaper: “Ke Kilohana Pookela no ka Lahui Hawaii” [The Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation]

[Go check out the Waikiki Aquarium today, Saturday, 3/22/2014! The 110th anniversary celebration continues with fun for the entire family! $1.10 admission to the Waikiki Aquarium all day! Activities include: the Great Marine Chalk Art Draw and Kids Doodle Zone, entertainment by the UH Rainbow Marching Band, Rainbow Dancers, and other guests groups, a special performance of the musical “Honu by the Sea,” free giveaways (while supplies last), LEGO build area, samples from Pepsi, educational and entertaining activities and much more!]

(Kuokoa, 3/25/1904, p. 1) Continue reading

The Kamehameha Museum and the Kamehameha Schools, 1894.

KA HALE HOIKEIKE O KAMEHAMEHA

THE ASSETS OF THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS.

In the will of Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop, who died on the 16th of October 1884, she set aside lands whose true value comes to $400,000, with $10,000 profit per year. These lands are in the hands of five trustees, with the stipulation that the profits go to the building and caring for a school for boys and girls.

This generosity was based on true aloha. On the 5th of April, 1885, the trustees met for the first time and selected the Hon. C. R. Bishop as President, Hon. S. M. Damon as treasurer, and Mr. C. M. Cooke as secretary. They are the finance committee, along with Rev. C. M. Hyde and W. O. Smith, made the education committee. On the 20th of August, 1886, up in Kalihi was chosen as the place where the school would stand, and Rev. W. B. Olsen of the Hilo boarding school to be a teacher, and the curriculum for three years was prepared and approved on the 25th of March, 1887. The cafeteria and some dormitories were completed on the 20th of October of that same year, and the school began with 50 students. There were two dormitories just built, which can house 126 students. One more dormitory is planned which will increase the number of students to 200. However more than that number of students can be accommodated.

In the will of Pauahi, the trustees were instructed to “build an English-language school where the children were to be educated in the regular branches of knowledge, and they were also to be educated to live morally and with important knowledge to make them industrious men and women, and I want high branches of knowledge to supplement those basics.” It is desired that the trustees “use a portion of the profits to go to the education and care of the indigent orphaned Hawaiian children.” As per the will, the school is opened to native Hawaiians, being that the trustees believe that was the true intent of Pauahi. However, the Hawaiians are not interested in the good put before them, the will does not preclude the the provision of those blessings to the other races who want to receive the benefits of an education.

The land set aside for the building of the school is up in Kalihi. The land mauka of King Street is set aside for the boys’ school; this is where the Kamehameha School now stands; the area of that land is 82 acres. There are 30 acres makai of the street, which is set aside for the girls’ school. The area for this school is in the heights of Kulaokaiwiula with it face overlooking the cit of Honolulu, and it is constantly fanned by the cool air of the valley of Kalihi; there is no other finer place for the health, the beauty, and the suitability as a school campus like this. Clear water is supplied to the school.

Below that are the workshops, the sewing shop and the printing shop. And mauka of these buildings is the mechanic shop.

The strength of the engine pumping the water is 20 horses, and the total power is utilized. There are two huge pools where the children will bathe until clean, and that is what will keep their bodies working strong. Between the sleeping quarters of the teachers were built the dormitories of the students. The student rooms are 18 x 12 wide, and are furnished with…

MRS. BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP.

…iron beds. The schools cafeteria is a long building, and it was built in the form of a cross. There are 20 dining tables accommodating 200 people at a time. Behind the children dormitories, are their laundry building, and so forth. Behind the principal’s house is the gymnasium. The museum is on the makai side of the principal’s house. This is a grand a beautiful structure constructed with rock from atop the land. Makai of the museum is Bishop Hall, and this is where the school rooms of the students are. This building is furnished with a library and a reading room.

On the makai side, almost adjacent to the road is the Kamehameha Preparatory School; there are sixty students from seven until twelve years of age.

In the yearly report of the Trustees for 1893 to the Chief Justice, it was seen that the school’s annual income was $62,008.55.

$33,545.15 was spent on the boys’ school. It was the Hon. C. R. Bishop who paid for the entire cost of the building of the Pauahi Bishop Museum and the preparatory school. Bishop also recently gave some of his valuable land holdings under the trustees, and several months ago, Mr. Bishop forwarded bonds of $30,000 for the benefit of the school, and the yearly income of these assets will be apportioned for the care and the expansion of the Pauahi Museum.

[It was just serendipity that caused me to notice this article the other day, and I thought with the re-opening of the new Pacific Hall at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, there was no better time to post this article about the actual beginnings of the Museum and of the Kamehameha Schools.

Check the early years of this familiar building (minus the dome) on campus as well, from an earlier post!

The public opening of Pacific Hall is tomorrow. Admission is free! Go check out all of the special events, and the newly redone Pacific Hall!!]

(Kuokoa 5/26/1894, p. 1)

KA WAIWAI O NA KULA KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 21, Aoao 1. Mei 26, 1894.