Sarai Hiwauli, 1856.

BIOGRAPHY OF S. HIWAULI II.

Sarai Hiwauli was born in Kahaluu, Koolaupoko, after the great plague here on Oahu during the time of Kamehameha I, and she was taken to Hilo, Hawaii to be raised, along with her parents and her kupuna; from Hopuola and Kalimahauna came Hiwauli, from Kahili and Napolo came Hopuola, from Kahiko and Kuanuuanu came Kahili, from Keaweikekino and Iliholo came Kahiko, from Hoou and Kamaiki came Keaweikekino, from Mahiopupelea and Kapaiki came Hoau, from Kanaloauoo and Kapulaiolaa came Kapaihi, from Kahoanokapuokuihewa and Kapahimaiakea came Kapuleiolaa, from Loheakauakeiki and Kalaniheliikauhilonohonua came Kahoanokapuokuihewa, from Kauhealuikawaokalani and LonowahineikahaleIkiopapa came Kalaniheliikauhilonohonua, from Kaholipioku and Moihala came LonowahineikahaleIkiopapa, from Lonoapii and Piilaniwahine came Moihala, and so on. Continue reading

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Sarai Hiwauli died, 1856.

DIED.

At Nawiliwili, Kauai, on the 29th of this past August, Sarai Hiwauli, the wife of Ioane Ii, of Honolulu nei. She was travelling with the Alii who were circuiting the land, and she got paralysis and died. She was returned by the ship the Maria in the morning of the 3rd of Sept. when the ship docked. And it will carry the King and the chiefs from Kauai to Hilo. Mr. Ii is at Hilo judging, and he was told to return.

Sarai Hiwauli was a loving, benevolent, and respectable woman. She was highly regarded by all for her righteousness and her piety. She will be mourned from Hawaii to Niihau by her fellow church members and mostly her people. “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.”

[The Hoku Loa was a page of the Pacific Commercial Advertiser from 7/2/1856 to 9/18/1856, and was a precursor to the Hawaiian-Language Newspaper, Kuokoa.]

(Hoku Loa o Hawaii, 9/11/1856 [Pacific Commercial Advertiser 9/11/1856, p. 4])

MAKE.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume I, Number 11, Page 4. September 11, 1856.

More on the commemorative tablets, but from the pen of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani himself, 1907.

COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE AT KAWAIAHAO

Memorial Tablets to the Alii of the Land are Unveiled.

This past Sunday the Kawaiahao Church was filled to listen to the commemorative program for John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea, and Ululani; the people whose names are inscribed on the marble tablets placed in the church.

On the wall mauka at the pulpit of the pastor is where the marble tablet of John Ii is placed, and mauka of the central door to enter into the chapel [keena pule] is where the tablet of the last three names.

The Kaahumanu Society came in great numbers on this day, and one side of the church was filled with them, and there were many visitors who came to witness the events held on that day.

It was Rev. H. H. Parker who introduced the two that gave the speeches about the history of those who were being memorialized on that day, they being Rev. S. L. Desha and the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani.

Rev. S. L. Desha’s speech relied heavily upon his introductory words that morning about the woman who anointed the feet of Jesus, and just as the words of the Lord speaks of the actions of that woman becoming something remembered, in that same way Desha presented things about John Ii.

He spoke of the story of this man from his childhood, and he was one of the intelligent ones who gave great assistance in guiding the nation forward.

When the missionary teachers urged the King to educate him, he chose John Ii to be educated along with the younger brother of the King; this showed the King had much trust in this man.

In the administration of the nation, John Ii was the first amongst the Hawaiians who the King chose for an important post. When a commissioner was being chosen to give lands to the people, he was one who was selected, and he rose to the position of judge on the Supreme Court.

When the King received instruction from San Francisco to send someone from Hawaii to sit in the jury of that city pertaining to the crime committed by a Hawaiian [Harry Kaheleiki], it was indeed John Ii who the king chose to send to hear this case, and this man’s abilities and intelligence was seen through his actions.

In his attitude towards religion, he was a man who always stuck to what was right, and he gave sermons at the Church of Ewa. It is said that if it was heard that he was the one to be speaking, the church would be filled, and people stood outside, and on one Sunday when he went to go pray, when he was headed home, he fell from his horse and broke a rib, and that was his ailment which persisted until his death.

It is said in the history of this man, he was a man of strength, and the Alii were of great importance to him. As a result of an accident involving one of the Alii, that being the Alii falling from a horse, he did not wait to find out the cause of this distress to the Alii, but his outrage was focused upon the horse, and in his anger, with but one punch he struck the horse and it died.

After the words about John Ii was done, the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani stood and read the story of the second part of the events of that day, and we are printing what he presented for them, just as he read, and here it is below:

Whereas:—The second portion of the events of this day is the dedication of the commemorative tablet for Ululani and Haalelea which is affixed to the wall in front of this church.

This gift was not on account of just one person, but it is a present from the people. It is the members, intimates, and friends of the Kawaiahao Church showing the family of the ones who died their aloha and their never-ending remembrance of Ululani Haalelea.

The reason and the cause that this endeavor was carried out by the members and it was decided to place it here in this church of Kawaiahao:

Whereas, Ululani did a great deed for this church and its members, over a long period of time, during her lifetime, and she was a brethren of this Church.

With the auspices of the Church, along with this commemorative speech, will be attached the history of her life, her birth, her fine works, and the list of names of the intimates and friends who were involved, and will be gifted to the family of Ululani Haalelea here in Honolulu and in other places.

(See page 8.)

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 1)

ANAINA HOOMANAO MA KAWAIAHAO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 1. Okatoba 18, 1907.

COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE AT KAWAIAHAO.

(From page 1.)

Ululani was born in they year 1842, in the month of July on the 21st, at Hilo, Hawaii. Sixteen years later, in the month of June, she was married to the alii, Levi Haalelea.

They lived in the holy covenant of matrimony until 1864, when Haalelea died; therefore, she only lived with her husband for six years, and they had not children.

In that very year, and a just before that time, Henry H. Parker came from his position as teacher at Lahainaluna College.

He was to serve as kahu of Kawaiahao Church, and it was then Ululani Haalelea was included into the church by this Henry H. Parker; she was the first fruit for righteousness in her confession of faith [hoike manaoio], and she became a member of the Kawaiahao Church.

And from then on she remained a member of the Church until her recent death in 1904; she was a member for 40 years, in her 62 years of life.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a chiefess who was steadfast in the righteousness of God. She was humble with aloha. She was pleasant and benevolent, she was a mother for the Christian good in Hawaii, she was a famous chiefess and prominent among the Courts of the Monarchs, and the high chiefs of the land, she was an attendant of Queens, and held honored positions in the courts of those days.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a leader and an adviser of the Beneficent association of this town, from the Beneficent Associations of the haole, to the haole women and to the Hawaiians; she was the vice president of the Ahahui Hoola Lahui of Kalakaua and Kapiolani, she was a distinguished member of the board of trustees of the Maternity Home, and a president of the Choir “Hawaii Noeau.”

In 1893, a difficult situation fell upon the membership of Kawaiahao, that being the Kahu realized the state of the church at that time; it was old and the wood all over the building was rotting.

He fetched carpenters and they came and looked; they said that shortly services could not be held in the near future; it was just a matter of time before it fell.

Therefore, that very year, the doors of the church were shut. And the meetings of the members were held in a coconut front lanai upon this grounds.

Looking on, there was nothing left to do; the members ordered the building be torn down from top to bottom, leaving only the stone walls.

There were two big problems at the time. 1. The poor and needy state of the Church; there was no money to reestablish and rebuild the church. 2. the overthrowing of the Monarchy of Hawaii that year. The thoughts of the Hawaiians and the haole were cleaved in two, the unity was broken, and aloha was broken into bits, and feelings of rage and anger grew. The church members were split in two with one group being patriots while the other group being for annexation.

Because of these problems, there grew many doubts and predictions of disaster. Kawaiahao would not be built anew for the land and the people were in turmoil. But Ululani Haalelea had no doubt, she stood up and holding a plow in her hand, in righteousness, and she set up the very first money-making event to rebuild Kawaiahao Church, among the many words of doom from the haole and Hawaiians alike.

Six months later, in December 1893, a great Fair [Aha Fea] was held in the uplands of Manamana, under the direction of Ululani assisted by Mrs. Annie Dowsett and the mothers of Kawaiahao, and the effort went smoothly.

Subtracting the expenses from the profits, what was left was $2000 in the funds to build the church.

At the same time, the members took action by figuring out on paper their donations. Some put $20, some $10, some $5, some $1.00, and so forth, and in the month of April of 1894, in the coconut frond lanai, the members gave their donations which totaled to $890 in cash, and $400 on paper.

When the wealthy haole amongst us living in Hawaii nei as well as in foreign lands saw that the members of Kawaiahao were taking action at the urging of Ululani Haalelea, they said, [“]We will now give you aid, O Kawaiahao, for we see that you are working and putting in great effort.[“]

Therefore, from Britain, from Theo. Davies, came $1000; from his wife $500; from C. R. Bishop $1000; and some others.

In that same year, the members chose a committee for the building of the church: The Kahu, Chairman; Ululani Haalelea, E. K. Lilikalani, D. L. Naone, Mary Adams, W. R. Castle, and P. C. Jones was the treasurer for the funds to build the church.

In the closing months of 1894, the church was completed, and the members entered after nine months of holding services in the Coconut frond  hut [hale papa’i Launiu]. The church was complete with the total expenses being $14,000. In the famous history of this church, it was King Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III who first set up the building of this church in the year 1839, and it was complete in 1843 and consecrated to Jehovah. Its head was Rev. Hiram Bingham [Rev. Hiram Binamu].

In 1892, the Jubilee of the old Kawaiahao was held. And it was torn down in 1893. Therefore the old Kawaiahao stood for 51 years before it was razed.

And in the reconstruction of the New Kawaiahao, Ululani Haalelea was the one with a steel heart of aloha in the works for the Lord who inspired the brethren, [“]Let’s rebuild the Church.[“] And this is what we see now, that it is better than the previous Kawaiahao. And Rev. H. H. Parker is the Kahu, the leader; therefore I say that Ululani Haalelea is a Chiefess who is ranked in the List of famous chiefesses of the land.

    1. Her Highness Victoria Kamamalu, was the one to establish the first Kaahumanu Society of women here in the town of Honolulu in 1864, just as you all on this day, and she was extremely intelligent and famous for her knowledge in singing and musical instruments.
    2. Queen Ema Kaleleonalani, was the one who established the Queen’s Hospital which is called by her name, a place of refuge for their [Queen Emma and Kamehameha IV] citizens in times of trouble.
    3. Her Highness, Princess Pauahi Bishop, dedicated all of her wealth for the Kamehameha Schools. A blessing for the generations of youth of her lahui.
    4. Queen Kapiolani was the one who established the Kapiolani Maternity Hospital called by her name, the place of rest for Hawaiian women for their periods of difficulty.
    5. And the Chiefess Ululani Haalelea, the second cornerstone, the one who lead her fellow laborers of good, [“]Let’s rebuild the Kawaiahao Church,[“] by establishing the first Fair [Fea], and the proceeds from it was dedicated to the funds for the construction of the church, and this was carried out, and it was built, and the Building was completed in time and paid off with no debt.

And we all are witnesses who see firsthand the famous works of these chiefesses. Those words of the Lord Jesus Christ about that woman who anointed him in oil were fulfilled: Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her.

In that way we are remembering Ululani, with this stone monument for her, for Haalelea, her own husband, and for Haalilio; along with the monument to the Hanai Parent of the chiefs, Ioane Ii, the great Judge of the Supreme Court during the reign of Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III,  a member of the National Boundary Commission, a member of the House of Nobles, and a native born chief. It was for all of them that the speeches of commemoration on this day were given, people who give pride to this land.

E. K. LILIKALANI.

[It is interesting to compare this account by E. K. Lilikalani with the account presented earlier in the PCA on 10/14/1907.]

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 8)

HE ANAINA HOOMANAO MA KAWAIAHAO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 8. Okatoba 18, 1907.

Memorial tablets in honor of John Papa Ii, Timoteo Haalilio, Levi Haalelea, and Ululani Haalelea, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

Dedicatory Services at Old Church Yesterday Morning.

Old Kawaiahao church yesterday morning was crowded for the dedication of memorial tablets in honor of John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea and Ululani, one tablet bearing the name of Ii and the other the three latter names. Old days were recalled as eloquent speakers spoke of the good works of the aliis who have passed away and in whose honor marble tablets have been inscribed.

The Rev. S. L. Desha officiated at the dedication of the Ioane Ii tablet and also spoke concerning Timoteo Haalilio, while the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani delivered the dedicatory as far as it concerned the memory of Levi and Ululani Haalelea.

The Rev. H. H. Parker was present and introduced the speakers with appropriate remarks.

The Rev. S. L. Desha referred to Ii as one of the high chieffs of the islands who had enjoyed the confidence of royalty, who was a member of Kawaiahao church when Bingham was pastor. He was a member of the Supreme Court and a member of the land commission under Kamehameha III and Kamehameha IV. Not was he only powerful for good in the work of the church, but he had always been noted as a man of great physical strength. One day a young prince had been thrown by an ill-tempered horse and Ii, to revenge royalty, killed the animal with one blow of his fist.

Speaking of Haalilio, Desha stated that this alii was born in Koolau, this island, of most distinguished parents, his mother having been Governor of Molokai. When he was eight years of age his father died and King Kamehameha III took him to court and when Mr. and Mrs. Cooke built the school for the royal princes, Haalilio went there to be educated. He graduated with honors, becoming a particularly good speaker of English.

Hon. Lilikalani, indicating the tablet upon which were the names of Haalelea and his wife, declared that it belonged to no one person, but to all the church for each and all had contributed to the expense.

Ululani was born, said Lilikalani, in…

(Continued on Page Four.)

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 1)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 1. October 14, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

(Continued from Page One.)

Hilo, July 22, 1842, and at the age of 16, in 1858, married Haalelea, related to the queen of Kamehameha III and to King Lunalilo. The husband died in 1864. There was no issue. In that year H. H. Parker came to Honolulu from Lahainaluna where he had been a teacher, to take the pastorate of Kawaiahao church. Then Mrs. Haalelea joined the church and for 40 years was an active and beloved member of the congregation. She was noted for her humble bearing and good Christian works. She was active among benefit societies for the Hawaiians and others and was a vice president of the Hui Hoola Lahui and an honorary member of the board of trustees of the Kapiolani Maternity Home. She was also one of the presidents of the Hui No Ea. In 1893 it was decided that the Kawaiahao church was a dangerous place to enter on account of the rottenness of the roof and other timbers. They were troublous times then, the dethronement of Liliuokalani being the tais and one man’s hand turned against another, said Lilikalani, and it was not thought that any money could be raised for repairs, but Mrs. Haalelea got up a church fair that realized $2000 and this money was the beginning of a fund that finally, with the help of prominent and generous Honolulu people, resulted in the repair of the sacred edifice. On this account Lilikalani referred to Mrs. Haalelea as the second founder of Kawaiahao.

[Check out this article on the same topic found in one of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, written by E. K. Lilikalani himself!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 4)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 4. October 14, 1907.

The Chiefs’ Children’s School and its beginnings. 1844.

Schools and Seminaries.—In the very important point of providing instruction for all classes, as in every other duty connected with their sacred calling, the missionaries stand prominent. With them, I believe, resides the merit of having excited the chiefs to desire a school for the systematic education of their children of both sexes. With the concurrence of the king and chiefs, in 1839, the American mission selected for that purpose Mr. & Mrs. Cooke, who were assistant missionaries. Having lately at the request of Dr. Judd, visited the school daily, to watch the progress of a disease, bearing more resemblance to the “typhus mitior” of “Cullen,” than any other known types of fever, I have been an eye-witness to the anxious and parental-like care of Mr. & Mrs. Cooke, both of the sick and healthy children of the chiefs; and I am prepared to state from observation, that a more proper selection could not have been made.

The school-room is very commodiously arranged. Strict order and obedience are observed, without any exertion of authority approaching to harshness. Books, maps, stationery, gloves (terrestrial and celestial,) are at all times within the access of the scholars, and there is an excellent apparatus to illustrate the movements of the planets which compose our solar system.

(Friend, August 1, 1844, p. 35)

37. Schools and Seminaries.

The Friend, Volume II, Number VIII, Page 35. August 1, 1844.

The following is a list of the young chiefs at present in the school of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke:

NAMES. WHEN BORN FATHER MOTHER ADOPTED BY
*Alexander Liholiho, 9 Feb. 1834. Kekuanaoa. Kinau. Kamehameha III.
†Moses Kekuaiwa, 20 July 1829. ditto. ditto. Kaieoewa [Kaikioewa].
‡Lot Kamehameha, 11 Dec. 1830. ditto. ditto. Hoapili.
‖William Charles Lunalilo, 31 Jan. 1835. Kanaina. **Kekauluohi.
Peter Young Kaeo, 4 March 1836. Kaeo. Lahilahi. John Young.
James Kaliokalani, 29 May 1835. Pakea [Kapaakea]. Keohokalole. Aikanaka.
David Kalakaua, 16 Nov. 1836. ditto. ditto. Haaheo Kania [Kaniu].
§Victoria Kamamalu, 4 Nov. 1838. Kekuanaoa. Kinau.
Bernice Pauahi, 19 Dec. 1831. Paki. Konia. Kinau.
Abigail [Lanihau] Maheha, 10 July 1832. Namaile. Liliha. Kekauonohi.
¶Jane Loeau, 5 Dec. 1828. Kalaiulumoku [Kalaniulumoku] [Liliha.] Kaukualii.
Elizabeth Kekaniau [Kekaaniau], 11  Sept. 1834. Laanui. Oana.
Emma Rooke, 2 Jan. 1836. Naea. Kekela. T. C. B. Rooke, M. D.
Lydia Makaeha [Kamakaeha], 2 Sept. 1838. Pakea [Kapaakea]. Keohokalole. Paki & Konia.
Polly Paaaina, 1833. Henry Lewis. Kekala [Kekela]. John Ii.

*Heir apparent to the crown. (The king having no children.)
†Governor presumptive of Kauai.
‡Gov. presumpt. of maui. (Now convalescing from fever.)
‖Convalescing from fever—(25th May.)
§Heir apparent to the premiership.
¶Half-sister of Abigail.
**The premier.

Nor do Mr. & Mrs. Cooke neglect to impress upon their pupils that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and religion the basis of all private and public worth. A portion of scripture is read morning and evening, with singing and prayer, in the presbyterian form of family worship.

On Sundays, the pupils regularly attend two services in native, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong, and one in English, by the Rev. Mr. Damon.

Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, both by precept and the example of their own well regulated family, enforce the utmost propriety of moral deportment, and every punctilio of cleanliness, dress, manner and address, calculated to add the polish of refinement to more solid and useful attainments.

The pupils rise with the sun, breakfast at 7 A. M., dine at 1 o’clock, take tea at 6 P. M., and retire early to rest. At table, Mr. and Mrs. Cooke always preside, and there is an abundant supply of good and substantial food.¹

The school hours are from 9 to 12 A. M., and from 2 to 5 P. M.

The medical care of the pupils has devolved upon Dr. G. P. Judd, who not withstanding his onerous and multifarious duties as secretary of state for foreign affairs, head of the financial department, &c., &c., always finds time to attend, when wanted. i myself have been an eye-witness of the extreme anxiety and tenderness with which he watched the progress of the fever of little William, whose symptoms were, for several weeks, very alarming. And it is but right I should add that his good and exemplary lady was a frequent visitor at the bed-side of the sick child.

It is impossible, in any part of the world, that sick children could have been better looked after, than were William, Lot and Jane, by Dr. Judd, and Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, whether as regards the curative or nursing department.

Amongst other things pleasing to observe, was the great concern and affection of the parents, especially in the case of William, who was the only one in real danger.

The pupils are encouraged in the gymnastical exercises which tend to develop the physical powers and fortify the constitution. Among these are playing ball, flying kites, cultivation of flowers, swinging, see-sawing, walking, and riding on horseback.

To me it is a most pleasing scene to see them all, boys and girls, well attired and well mounted, merry and good humored, curvetting, galloping and turning round their horses with great dexterity. This pleasure I have, almost every evening during my rides, as I seldom fail to meet and ride on part of my way with them.

When Admiral Thomas was here, he was always glad to see them at his house, and to encourage them to go out to tea-parties at the houses of respectable foreign residents here. I have thus met the young chiefs often in society, and I have always found that they support their part in the conversation, in English, with much decorum and propriety. In fact, there is nothing perceptible in their manner or habits that could strike a stranger as differing much from the manners and habits of young English or Americans of the same age.

Each child or pupil has from two to six native attendants, namely: tailors, washers, grooms, &c., according to the age, rank and sex of each; and these are all under the direction of John Ii and his wife, both most respectable natives, who cooperate with Mr. and Mrs. Cooke in excluding these attendants from any intercourse of intimacy with the young chiefs that could communicate to them their own vices, prejudices and superstitions.

Mr. Cooke assures me that in every department of education, they show a readiness and docility quite equal to any other children, of the same ages, and under the same circumstances.

If is evident that under his and Mrs. Cooke’s tuition, these young chiefs will go forth into the world and assume their respective stations, having a fund of general knowledge vastly superior to what is sometimes found in the riders of extensive provinces, and even some republics in Spanish America. It is equally obvious that the administration of these future rulers must be immeasurably more enlightened than any that has ever before existed in these islands; and when they come into power, a new and better order of things may be expected.

This most useful institution, fraught with so many blessings present and prospective, temporal and spiritual, is supported at an expense to the government of about $2000 yearly. This is all that is allowed to Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, for their own salaries, for finding the table, domestics and all incidental expenses. To me it is incomprehensible how they can do so much, with so little.

The clothing is found by the parents or guardians of the pupils. It is supplied in abundance and good taste.

Separate rooms are provided for every two of the pupils; and the apartments are clean, well furnished and well ventilated. There are in all 17 rooms of various dimensions, opening into a court 36 feet square, with windows on the outside, which is 76 feet square. The whole building cost originally little more than $2000, though it is solidly constructed with sun-dried bricks (adobes) with a well thatched roof. But the furniture must have cost a great deal, as no comfort, in that respect, that can be imagined, is wanting.

The Rev. Mr. Dibble says that the king, when surveying the happy group, and noticing their improvement, remarked: “I wish my lot had been like yours; I deeply regret the foolish manner in which I spent the years of my youth;” and I would venture to add, that the king has more reason to be proud of this chiefs’ school than of any thing within his dominion.

(Friend, August 1, 1844, p. 36)

The following is a list...

The Friend, Volume II, Number VIII, Page 36. August 1, 1844.

¹This comment about the abundance of food reminded me of something Liliuokalani said in Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen. “…our instructors were especially particular to teach us the proper use of the English language; but when I recall the instances in which we were sent hungry to bed, it seems to me that they failed to remember that we were growing children. A thick slice of bread covered with molasses was usually the sole article of our supper, and we were sometimes ingenious, if not over honest, in our search for food: if we could beg something of the cook it was the easier way; but if not, anything eatable left within our reach was surely confiscated. As a last resort, we were not above searching the gardens for any esculent root or leaf, which (having inherited the art of igniting a fire from the friction of sticks), we could cook and consume without the knowledge of our preceptors.”

Speaking of Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, i was expecting the new much-awaited edition to be available already, but hopefully it will be out in bookstores soon! I am thinking of putting up related articles like this one (mostly from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers) to perhaps give a fuller picture of topics covered in the Queen’s book.

[This is written by Robert Crichton Wyllie, and is found in a very enlightening treatise describing many aspects of life in Honolulu in the 1840s. “NOTE On the Shipping, Trade, Agriculture, Climate, Diseases, Religious Institutions, Civil and Social Conditions, Mercantile and Financial Policy of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands, viewed in relation to other groups of islands, and to the natural and acquired advantages of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands.” Friend, June 1–September 24, 1844.]

Restoration celebration at Kaniakapupu, 1847.

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The 31st of July, appears to have become a national holyday among the Hawaiians. So far from discouraging its annual observance, we think it should be rather encouraged. A proper recognition of the day will foster a spirit of patriotism. The late anniversary appears to have been partly festive and partly religious. It was so intended.—All classes of our population were invited to a picnic at His Majesty’s summer residence in Nuuanu Valley. Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, great numbers resorted thither; besides pedestrians, several thousands on horse back. Says the Polynesian, “one man hired to count them, commenced early in the day and made out 3,600, going up and 4,600 down—another 1,637 following the King, and 362 straggling. His account was only for part of the day.—The Governor’s computation is 3,000, besides those that come from Koolau.” Suffice it to say, probably a larger company has not been assembled for many years.

Our limits will not allow a detailed account of the animating scenes of the day. A multitude seemed much interested in the spear-exercise and other Hawaiian sports. A sumptuous entertainment was spread for foreigners, while the Hawaiians were served, in a style, that reflected great credit upon His Majesty, the Governor, Paki, John Ii, and others who were directly or indirectly concerned. We can truly remark, that we never witnessed so numerous a gathering, where such perfect order, propriety and regularity were maintained. “There seemed to be a place for every man and every man was in his place.” The following summary of the various dishes served up for the occasion will show that the tables must have groaned under the weight of the viands:—

271 hogs, 482 large calabashes of poi, 602 chickens, 3 oxen, 2 barrels salt pork, 2 of bread, 3,125 salt fish, 1,820 fresh do., 12 1-2 barrels luau and cabbage, 4 do. onions, 18 bunches bananas, 55 pine apples, 10 barrels potatoes, 55 ducks, 82 Turkeys, 2,245 cocoanuts, 4,000 heads of kalo, 180 squid, Grapes and other etcetera, sufficient to feast 12,000 people.

We must not fail to notice one circumstance which was something new for this quarter of the globe. “A coach and four” was a new feature in the procession of a Polynesian chieftain. The Royal party rose in the carriage originally presented by Queen Victoria to her sister Queen, Pomare, but which the latter, in her poverty, was obliged to dispose of by sale. We very much doubt whether any King ever rode through the streets of the capital of his kingdom, when greater order and decorum reigned. To the triumph of Temperance principles among the Hawaiians and foreigners, must be attributed much of the good order that was every where apparent throughout the day.

In the evening, His Majesty, chiefs, foreign officers of government, many of the residents, and numbers of the native population assembled for religious service at the King’s Chapel. A discourse was preached in native and afterwards repeated in English, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong. The singing was good. The sermon of the Mr. Armstrong has already been published in the columns of the Government Organ. We hops it will be read.

[This and the rest of The Friend can be found here at the click of a mouse on the Mission Children Society page!

This celebration is also described in Thrum’s Annual for 1930!]

(Friend, 8/12/1847, p. 117.)

Fourth Anniversary of the Restoration.

The Friend, Volume V, Number XV, Page 117. August 12, 1847.

Cotton grown in Hawaii, 1863.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Growing well.—We have seen the cotton plantation at Mililani, of the Honorable John Ii [Ioane Ii]; and we are in admiration at how well it is growing. What about us, O Friends? Shouldn’t we emulate the efforts of the Honorable One? We must follow the good example put before us and plant our land with cotton, that thing which will make us rich.

(Kuokoa, 8/22/1863, p. 2)

Maikai ka ulu ana.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke II, Helu 34, Aoao 2. Augate 22, 1863.