Death of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani, 1917.

Edward K. Lilikalani Left this Life Behind

On the Fourth of last week, Edward K. Lilikalani left this life at sixty-eight years of age at his home on 415 Queen Street, and on this Sunday his body was carried from Williams’ place [mortuary] for the cemetery of Kawaiahao where the last service will be held over his body by the kahu of Kawaiahao, H. H. Parker. Continue reading

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Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

Elizabeth Lilikalani weds John Punua, 1905.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

On the 4th of this month, Miss Elizabeth Lilikalani, daughter of the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani, was joined with John Punua, by Rev. W. N. Lono, the kahu of Kaumakapili Church.

(Kuokoa, 8/11/1905, p. 5)

Ma ka la 4...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 32, Aoao 5. Augate 11, 1905.

Translation of Edward Lilikalani’s response to the haole Memorial, 1876.

[Translated from the Kuokoa, of Mar. 18.]

The Memorial.

Mr. Editor:—In the Commercial of the last Saturday I observe a matter of importance emanating from foreigners of Honolulu. It is a memorial to the King in respect to repopulation, and mainly advocating the bringing hither of people from India whereby this nation shall be reinvigorated.

 Therein also the King is recommended to seek for information abroad from persons skilled in such matters. This is not, I think, good advice; the real meaning however is a contempt for the Ministers because they have done nothing.

The astonishing thing about this memorial is that the Hawaiian people are entirely left out in so important a matter as a proposition to bring people from a foreign land to increase this nation.

The idea of increasing the nation by bringing people of another country here, is a good one, but it is proper that the Hawaiians themselves should be as well consulted in the matter. But we are altogether thrown on one side; and if the foreigners wish to bring East Indians here to increase without our concurrence or knowledge, it will be altogether wrong. If this is really their intention, thus to treat us like dumb animals, then we had better arise and seriously consider this startling scheme that is being projected among the foreigners.

Know O Hawaiian People! The King’s increase of the nation is the Reciprocity Treaty. When we have got that secured and in operation, then we will consider in regard to getting people from India, Japan, China or Malaysia; provide first something for people to do when they arrive; but if you get laborers now, and East India population, where is the work for them to do or the land to give them.

The impudence and haste of these people is surprising; they appear like a lot of children, fuming and showing their teeth at the Ministers, accusing them and accusing the King of having done nothing. Indeed! and how about the Treaty?

Another surprising thing is that four members of the House of Nobles signed their names to that paper, Messrs. Rhodes, Cleghorn, Smith and Castle. Which of these labored so hard to put the King on the throne, as stated in the memorial? I am of the opinion that the names of some of these persons are those of annexationists, who were strong for the treaty when Lunalilo was King. It is certain that they did not vote for the present King, for they were not then in the Legislature, having only recently been appointed as Nobles. I am of the opinion that they having thus dragged the King’s Ministers into the memorial, it would be well for the King to withdraw their appointments, or better still that they return their patents as Nobles to His Majesty—if it was not for the fact that it would be unconstitutional.

Perhaps they want to become Ministers themselves? Yes, that is so; but if their judgments are thus perverted, they are unfit for the Ministerial office, for they would by and bye be doing something without consulting the people, and disaster might follow. Let their desires be disappointed, and let the King appoint none but native Hawaiians.

This is a matter for the Legislature to attend to; but as we have not been consulted by the memorialists, it is proper that we should stand and consider what is to be the end of this business.

Respectfully,  Edward Lilikalani.

[Here is a translation of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani’s response to the repopulation memorial that was printed in the Kuokoa on 3/18/1876.]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 3/25/1876, p. 3)

The Memorial.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XX, Number 39, Page 3. March 25, 1876.

Edward Lilikalani responds to the Memorial by the haole, 1867.

Ka palapala Memoriala.

E ka Nupepa Kuokoa e; Aloha oe:—

Ua ike iho wau ma ka nupepa Kalepa o kela Poaono i hala ae nei, i kahi mau mea nui i hanaia e na haole o ke kulanakauhale nei o Honolulu, oia hoi he Palapala Memoriala maloko o laila, he mau kumu hoopii i ka Moi, e hooulu i ka lahui, a o ke ano nui o ka hooulu i oleloia ma ua palapala nei, oia no ke kii ana i ka Lahui Inia, a e hoopae mai i kumu e hoowelo hou aku ai i keia lahui kanaka.

A maloko no hoi oia palapala, he noi ana kekahi i ka Moi, e hele ae mawaho e kuka ai me kekahi poe akamai e ae. Ma keia ke manao nei au ua alakai hewa ka Memoriala i ka Moi; o ke ano maoli nae o keia o ka hoowahawaha i na Kuhina no ko lakou hana ole.

Eia ka mea kupaianaha o keia palapala Memoriala, o ke kapae loa ia ana o na kanaka Hawaii ma keia noi ano nui, e hoopae mai i ka lahui kanaka o ko na aina e ma ko kakou aina nei, e hooulu i keia lahui.

He manao maikai ka hooulu ana i ka lahui, mai ko na aina e mai, aka, e pono o kakou o na kanaka Hawaii kekahi e kuka pu no keia mea. Aka, ua kiloi loa ia kakou ma kahi e; ina paha ua makemake na haole e hoopae mai i keia lahui o Inia me ke kuka ole me kakou, ka poe a ua Inia nei e hele mai ana e hooulu, alaila, he mea hewa loa ko kakou ike e ole. A ina ua kiola loaia kakou a hooliloia me he mau holoholona’la, ka i ae no o ua poe haole nei e hoopae mai i ka Inia, na lakou no e onou okoa mai, me ko kakou ae ole; alaila, e pono no e ku kakou, a noonoo nui no keia hana i ulu kamahao ae iwaena o na haole.

E ike e ka Lahui Hawaii! O ka Hooulu Lahui a ka Moi ma ke kalaunu, oia no ke Kuikahi Panailike. A loaa mai ia a noho pu, a paa i ko kakou lima, alaila, noonoo ae, no ke kii ana’ku i na Inia, Iapana, Kina, a Malaea paha, i loaa mua na kumu hana a keia poe e hana ai, ke hiki mai, aka, ina e kii wale ia no na paahana, a me na Inia hooulu lahui, auhea ka hana, a me ka aina e haawi ai ia lakou.

He kupanaha ka mahaoi, a me ka lele e o lakou nei; ua hoolilo lakou ia lakou iho me he mau kamalii liilii’la, e hakaka ana, e hookeke wale ana no i na niho i na Kuhina o ka Moi, me ka olelo iho aole ka a lakou hana, aole ka a ka Moi hana. He kupaianaha, pehea ka ke Kuikahi?

Eia kekahi mea kupaianaha, he eha mau alii o ka Hale Ahaolelo alii i kakau i ko lakou mau inoa ma ia palapala. Oia o Kapena Loke, o Ake, Kamika, a me Kakela; owai o keia poe i hooikaika e hoonoho i ka Moi ma ka noho alii, e like me ka olelo o ua palapala la? Ke manao nei au o kekahi mau inoa o keia poe he mau hoohui aupuni lakou, i ikaika loa no ke kuikahi ia Lunalilo ka Moi, o ka mea i maopopo lea o ka Ahaolelo no, aole lakou nei ia wa, eia wale mai no mahope nei ko lakou lilo ana i mau alii no ka Hale Ahaolelo. A ke manao nei au, o ko lakou pakui ana aku i na Kuhina o ka Moi ma keia palapala noi, me ke kumu ole, e  pono e hoihoi mai ka Moi i ko lakou mau palapala hookohu, o ka pono loa no ko lakou hoihoi okoa aku i ko lakou mau hookohu alii i ka Moi, ina aole he paku nui nana e alai nei oia no ke kumukanawai.

E makemake ana paha e lilo lakou i mau kuhina ea. Ae! oia maoli no, aka, ina pela iho la ke kau kapakahi o ko lakou mau manao, alaila, aole lakou e pono e lilo i mau kuhina, mamuli hana lakou i na hana me ka ui ole mai ia kakou, a poino kakou. E pono no e hoohokaia ko lakou manao, a e koho ka Moi i poe kanaka Hawaii wale no.

He hana keia na ke kau Ahaolelo e hana ai, aka, no ko lakou ui ole ia mai e pono no e ku kakou a noonoo i ka hopena o keia hana. Me ka mahalo.

Edward Lilikalani.

[Find a translation of this rebuke by Edward Kamakau Lilikalani in the Advertiser of 3/25/1876.]

(Kuokoa, 3/18/1876, p. 4)

Ka palapala Memoriala.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XV, Helu 12, Aoao 4. Maraki 18, 1876.

More on the commemorative tablets, but from the pen of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani himself, 1907.

COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE AT KAWAIAHAO

Memorial Tablets to the Alii of the Land are Unveiled.

This past Sunday the Kawaiahao Church was filled to listen to the commemorative program for John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea, and Ululani; the people whose names are inscribed on the marble tablets placed in the church.

On the wall mauka at the pulpit of the pastor is where the marble tablet of John Ii is placed, and mauka of the central door to enter into the chapel [keena pule] is where the tablet of the last three names.

The Kaahumanu Society came in great numbers on this day, and one side of the church was filled with them, and there were many visitors who came to witness the events held on that day.

It was Rev. H. H. Parker who introduced the two that gave the speeches about the history of those who were being memorialized on that day, they being Rev. S. L. Desha and the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani.

Rev. S. L. Desha’s speech relied heavily upon his introductory words that morning about the woman who anointed the feet of Jesus, and just as the words of the Lord speaks of the actions of that woman becoming something remembered, in that same way Desha presented things about John Ii.

He spoke of the story of this man from his childhood, and he was one of the intelligent ones who gave great assistance in guiding the nation forward.

When the missionary teachers urged the King to educate him, he chose John Ii to be educated along with the younger brother of the King; this showed the King had much trust in this man.

In the administration of the nation, John Ii was the first amongst the Hawaiians who the King chose for an important post. When a commissioner was being chosen to give lands to the people, he was one who was selected, and he rose to the position of judge on the Supreme Court.

When the King received instruction from San Francisco to send someone from Hawaii to sit in the jury of that city pertaining to the crime committed by a Hawaiian [Harry Kaheleiki], it was indeed John Ii who the king chose to send to hear this case, and this man’s abilities and intelligence was seen through his actions.

In his attitude towards religion, he was a man who always stuck to what was right, and he gave sermons at the Church of Ewa. It is said that if it was heard that he was the one to be speaking, the church would be filled, and people stood outside, and on one Sunday when he went to go pray, when he was headed home, he fell from his horse and broke a rib, and that was his ailment which persisted until his death.

It is said in the history of this man, he was a man of strength, and the Alii were of great importance to him. As a result of an accident involving one of the Alii, that being the Alii falling from a horse, he did not wait to find out the cause of this distress to the Alii, but his outrage was focused upon the horse, and in his anger, with but one punch he struck the horse and it died.

After the words about John Ii was done, the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani stood and read the story of the second part of the events of that day, and we are printing what he presented for them, just as he read, and here it is below:

Whereas:—The second portion of the events of this day is the dedication of the commemorative tablet for Ululani and Haalelea which is affixed to the wall in front of this church.

This gift was not on account of just one person, but it is a present from the people. It is the members, intimates, and friends of the Kawaiahao Church showing the family of the ones who died their aloha and their never-ending remembrance of Ululani Haalelea.

The reason and the cause that this endeavor was carried out by the members and it was decided to place it here in this church of Kawaiahao:

Whereas, Ululani did a great deed for this church and its members, over a long period of time, during her lifetime, and she was a brethren of this Church.

With the auspices of the Church, along with this commemorative speech, will be attached the history of her life, her birth, her fine works, and the list of names of the intimates and friends who were involved, and will be gifted to the family of Ululani Haalelea here in Honolulu and in other places.

(See page 8.)

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 1)

ANAINA HOOMANAO MA KAWAIAHAO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 1. Okatoba 18, 1907.

COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE AT KAWAIAHAO.

(From page 1.)

Ululani was born in they year 1842, in the month of July on the 21st, at Hilo, Hawaii. Sixteen years later, in the month of June, she was married to the alii, Levi Haalelea.

They lived in the holy covenant of matrimony until 1864, when Haalelea died; therefore, she only lived with her husband for six years, and they had not children.

In that very year, and a just before that time, Henry H. Parker came from his position as teacher at Lahainaluna College.

He was to serve as kahu of Kawaiahao Church, and it was then Ululani Haalelea was included into the church by this Henry H. Parker; she was the first fruit for righteousness in her confession of faith [hoike manaoio], and she became a member of the Kawaiahao Church.

And from then on she remained a member of the Church until her recent death in 1904; she was a member for 40 years, in her 62 years of life.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a chiefess who was steadfast in the righteousness of God. She was humble with aloha. She was pleasant and benevolent, she was a mother for the Christian good in Hawaii, she was a famous chiefess and prominent among the Courts of the Monarchs, and the high chiefs of the land, she was an attendant of Queens, and held honored positions in the courts of those days.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a leader and an adviser of the Beneficent association of this town, from the Beneficent Associations of the haole, to the haole women and to the Hawaiians; she was the vice president of the Ahahui Hoola Lahui of Kalakaua and Kapiolani, she was a distinguished member of the board of trustees of the Maternity Home, and a president of the Choir “Hawaii Noeau.”

In 1893, a difficult situation fell upon the membership of Kawaiahao, that being the Kahu realized the state of the church at that time; it was old and the wood all over the building was rotting.

He fetched carpenters and they came and looked; they said that shortly services could not be held in the near future; it was just a matter of time before it fell.

Therefore, that very year, the doors of the church were shut. And the meetings of the members were held in a coconut front lanai upon this grounds.

Looking on, there was nothing left to do; the members ordered the building be torn down from top to bottom, leaving only the stone walls.

There were two big problems at the time. 1. The poor and needy state of the Church; there was no money to reestablish and rebuild the church. 2. the overthrowing of the Monarchy of Hawaii that year. The thoughts of the Hawaiians and the haole were cleaved in two, the unity was broken, and aloha was broken into bits, and feelings of rage and anger grew. The church members were split in two with one group being patriots while the other group being for annexation.

Because of these problems, there grew many doubts and predictions of disaster. Kawaiahao would not be built anew for the land and the people were in turmoil. But Ululani Haalelea had no doubt, she stood up and holding a plow in her hand, in righteousness, and she set up the very first money-making event to rebuild Kawaiahao Church, among the many words of doom from the haole and Hawaiians alike.

Six months later, in December 1893, a great Fair [Aha Fea] was held in the uplands of Manamana, under the direction of Ululani assisted by Mrs. Annie Dowsett and the mothers of Kawaiahao, and the effort went smoothly.

Subtracting the expenses from the profits, what was left was $2000 in the funds to build the church.

At the same time, the members took action by figuring out on paper their donations. Some put $20, some $10, some $5, some $1.00, and so forth, and in the month of April of 1894, in the coconut frond lanai, the members gave their donations which totaled to $890 in cash, and $400 on paper.

When the wealthy haole amongst us living in Hawaii nei as well as in foreign lands saw that the members of Kawaiahao were taking action at the urging of Ululani Haalelea, they said, [“]We will now give you aid, O Kawaiahao, for we see that you are working and putting in great effort.[“]

Therefore, from Britain, from Theo. Davies, came $1000; from his wife $500; from C. R. Bishop $1000; and some others.

In that same year, the members chose a committee for the building of the church: The Kahu, Chairman; Ululani Haalelea, E. K. Lilikalani, D. L. Naone, Mary Adams, W. R. Castle, and P. C. Jones was the treasurer for the funds to build the church.

In the closing months of 1894, the church was completed, and the members entered after nine months of holding services in the Coconut frond  hut [hale papa’i Launiu]. The church was complete with the total expenses being $14,000. In the famous history of this church, it was King Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III who first set up the building of this church in the year 1839, and it was complete in 1843 and consecrated to Jehovah. Its head was Rev. Hiram Bingham [Rev. Hiram Binamu].

In 1892, the Jubilee of the old Kawaiahao was held. And it was torn down in 1893. Therefore the old Kawaiahao stood for 51 years before it was razed.

And in the reconstruction of the New Kawaiahao, Ululani Haalelea was the one with a steel heart of aloha in the works for the Lord who inspired the brethren, [“]Let’s rebuild the Church.[“] And this is what we see now, that it is better than the previous Kawaiahao. And Rev. H. H. Parker is the Kahu, the leader; therefore I say that Ululani Haalelea is a Chiefess who is ranked in the List of famous chiefesses of the land.

    1. Her Highness Victoria Kamamalu, was the one to establish the first Kaahumanu Society of women here in the town of Honolulu in 1864, just as you all on this day, and she was extremely intelligent and famous for her knowledge in singing and musical instruments.
    2. Queen Ema Kaleleonalani, was the one who established the Queen’s Hospital which is called by her name, a place of refuge for their [Queen Emma and Kamehameha IV] citizens in times of trouble.
    3. Her Highness, Princess Pauahi Bishop, dedicated all of her wealth for the Kamehameha Schools. A blessing for the generations of youth of her lahui.
    4. Queen Kapiolani was the one who established the Kapiolani Maternity Hospital called by her name, the place of rest for Hawaiian women for their periods of difficulty.
    5. And the Chiefess Ululani Haalelea, the second cornerstone, the one who lead her fellow laborers of good, [“]Let’s rebuild the Kawaiahao Church,[“] by establishing the first Fair [Fea], and the proceeds from it was dedicated to the funds for the construction of the church, and this was carried out, and it was built, and the Building was completed in time and paid off with no debt.

And we all are witnesses who see firsthand the famous works of these chiefesses. Those words of the Lord Jesus Christ about that woman who anointed him in oil were fulfilled: Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her.

In that way we are remembering Ululani, with this stone monument for her, for Haalelea, her own husband, and for Haalilio; along with the monument to the Hanai Parent of the chiefs, Ioane Ii, the great Judge of the Supreme Court during the reign of Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III,  a member of the National Boundary Commission, a member of the House of Nobles, and a native born chief. It was for all of them that the speeches of commemoration on this day were given, people who give pride to this land.

E. K. LILIKALANI.

[It is interesting to compare this account by E. K. Lilikalani with the account presented earlier in the PCA on 10/14/1907.]

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 8)

HE ANAINA HOOMANAO MA KAWAIAHAO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 8. Okatoba 18, 1907.

Memorial tablets in honor of John Papa Ii, Timoteo Haalilio, Levi Haalelea, and Ululani Haalelea, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

Dedicatory Services at Old Church Yesterday Morning.

Old Kawaiahao church yesterday morning was crowded for the dedication of memorial tablets in honor of John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea and Ululani, one tablet bearing the name of Ii and the other the three latter names. Old days were recalled as eloquent speakers spoke of the good works of the aliis who have passed away and in whose honor marble tablets have been inscribed.

The Rev. S. L. Desha officiated at the dedication of the Ioane Ii tablet and also spoke concerning Timoteo Haalilio, while the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani delivered the dedicatory as far as it concerned the memory of Levi and Ululani Haalelea.

The Rev. H. H. Parker was present and introduced the speakers with appropriate remarks.

The Rev. S. L. Desha referred to Ii as one of the high chieffs of the islands who had enjoyed the confidence of royalty, who was a member of Kawaiahao church when Bingham was pastor. He was a member of the Supreme Court and a member of the land commission under Kamehameha III and Kamehameha IV. Not was he only powerful for good in the work of the church, but he had always been noted as a man of great physical strength. One day a young prince had been thrown by an ill-tempered horse and Ii, to revenge royalty, killed the animal with one blow of his fist.

Speaking of Haalilio, Desha stated that this alii was born in Koolau, this island, of most distinguished parents, his mother having been Governor of Molokai. When he was eight years of age his father died and King Kamehameha III took him to court and when Mr. and Mrs. Cooke built the school for the royal princes, Haalilio went there to be educated. He graduated with honors, becoming a particularly good speaker of English.

Hon. Lilikalani, indicating the tablet upon which were the names of Haalelea and his wife, declared that it belonged to no one person, but to all the church for each and all had contributed to the expense.

Ululani was born, said Lilikalani, in…

(Continued on Page Four.)

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 1)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 1. October 14, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

(Continued from Page One.)

Hilo, July 22, 1842, and at the age of 16, in 1858, married Haalelea, related to the queen of Kamehameha III and to King Lunalilo. The husband died in 1864. There was no issue. In that year H. H. Parker came to Honolulu from Lahainaluna where he had been a teacher, to take the pastorate of Kawaiahao church. Then Mrs. Haalelea joined the church and for 40 years was an active and beloved member of the congregation. She was noted for her humble bearing and good Christian works. She was active among benefit societies for the Hawaiians and others and was a vice president of the Hui Hoola Lahui and an honorary member of the board of trustees of the Kapiolani Maternity Home. She was also one of the presidents of the Hui No Ea. In 1893 it was decided that the Kawaiahao church was a dangerous place to enter on account of the rottenness of the roof and other timbers. They were troublous times then, the dethronement of Liliuokalani being the tais and one man’s hand turned against another, said Lilikalani, and it was not thought that any money could be raised for repairs, but Mrs. Haalelea got up a church fair that realized $2000 and this money was the beginning of a fund that finally, with the help of prominent and generous Honolulu people, resulted in the repair of the sacred edifice. On this account Lilikalani referred to Mrs. Haalelea as the second founder of Kawaiahao.

[Check out this article on the same topic found in one of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, written by E. K. Lilikalani himself!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 4)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 4. October 14, 1907.