Celebrating Liliu’s 75th birthday, 1913.

LILIU IS 75 YEARS OLD

There Were Many Who Went to Congratulate Her This Tuesday.

This Tuesday past, Queen Liliuokalani was seventy-five years old, and her friends, companions, locals and foreigners visited her at her home at Washington Place to see her, and to give their congratulations to the Queen of Hawaii nei for reaching that old age.

Just like in past years, there was a rush of the citizens of town to see Queen Liliu; it was so in the morning of this Tuesday, and the Queen welcomed warmly all who shook hands with her; it is estimated that their number reached a thousand.

The hours set aside for the public to visit her was from eleven o’clock to twelve o’clock, but there was celebration on the previous Monday night by singing groups with their instruments, as they serenaded the window of the home of the person for whose birthday it was, until the hours when the sun appeared.

After eight o’clock in the morning of that Tuesday, there was also a luau given to celebrate the day, and the royal attendants and a few malihini were invited, and they sat at the table laden with so many good things.

When the time came for the opening of the audience with the public at eleven o’clock of that morning, everyone showed up at Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale], and there too was the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] honoring the one whose birthday it was.

Present was the Honorable Edward K. Lilikalani, where he stood ready to greet the public, and Colonel Iaukea and John Dominis introduced them before Queen Liliu, as the Queen would always give a smile to each and everyone who shook hands with her.

There also was Princess Kawananakoa to assist the Queen, wearing her finery, while the interior of the reception room was decorated with flowers, and feather capes [ahuula], kahili, and everything hearkening back to the past era, the time when this archipelago was governed by Monarchs.

At this audience, there were many Hawaiians who showed their affection for their queen, by kneeling before her and kissing her hand as they were used to doing.

After the audience, the Queen and her attendants got aboard automobiles headed for her seaside home in Waikiki, where a party was prepared and waited for her and the malihini invited to meet with her and to enjoy with her that day.

The Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] was also there following her to Waikiki, to continue to give honor to the table of the queen.

There were several hundreds of invited people that arrived to that party, from kamaaina to malihini, and they all ate until satiated of what was prepared, and they drank to the health and happiness of the mother, with happy thoughts and with hope that the life of Queen Liliu would be extended and that she would have more years to live.

(Kuokoa, 9/5/1913, p. 1)

PIHA NA MAKAHIKI HE 75 IA LILIU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 35, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 5, 1913.

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“Beautifying” Waikiki: Have we changed that much in a hundred years? 1912.

CORAL BLOWN UP AT A SWIMMING SPOT IN WAIKIKI.

Because of a great desire to make the swimming area in Waikiki outside of the Moana Hotel great in the future, they have begun to clear coral from the ocean by blowing it up using giant powder [kiana pauda] under the direction of the general manager of the hotel, on Thursday of last week.

The blasting has begun on the Ewa side of the wharf, by some Japanese and Hawaiians, near the head of that wharf. In the first blasting, holes were dug into the coral, and after, cracks were seen in the coral bed. It was quick work putting in some explosives in the cracks while lighting it using a long fuse held on shore  and then it exploded.

There were many small fishes killed because of the blast. There was a big scow taken there and the coral that was blown off was carried away upon it. It is imagined that it will be several months before the work there will be done and the area will then be a fine bathing spot.

(Kuokoa, 7/26/1912, p. 4)

HOOPA-HUIA NA AKOAKOA MA KAHI AUAU O WAIKIKI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 30, Aoao 4. Iulai 26, 1912.