Commentary on Hawaiian Music and Liliu’s “Mele Lahui Hawaii,” 1867.

Hawaiian Music.—It is something to hear of Hawaiians, who but a few years ago, as a nation, possessed no other songs but the semi-barbarous Meles of their ancestors, and no other music than the montonous “ah—ah,——o—oo—u—uu,” of former years,—it is something pleasingly new to have to note the appearance of a neatly lithographed sheet of music for sale in the bookstore, both the words and music of which were composed by a Hawaiian lady. The title describes the sentiments expressed in the composition—”He Mele Lahui Hawaii,” or, in English, “A Hawaiian National Hymn.” The words are not rhyme, but read smoothly, with the euphony characteristic of the Hawaiian tongue, and the music is very sweet, the first few bars resembling those of the popular song of “Hazel Dell.” When sung by a full choir of natives, many of whom, male and female, have well managed voices of peculiar sweetness of tone, the “National Hymn,” expressing as it does both piety and patriotism, cannot fail to become popular. The lithography is very creditably done at Newcomb & Co’s book-bindery. We subjoin a translations of the words:

Almighty Father, bend thine ear,
And list the nation’s prayer,
That lowly bows before thy throne,
And seeks thy fostering care.
Grant thy peace throughout the land,
O’er each sunny sea-girt isle;
Keep the nation’s life, O Lord,
And upon our Sovereign smile. Continue reading

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News out of Lahaina, 1867.

From Lahaina.

Pertaining to the Queen.—Queen Emma has returned from her tour of Wailuku on this past Tuesday evening of May, and it was at 8 o’clock that she reached here in Lahaina. She was accompanied by the distinguished ones of the valley shade [ka malu hekuawa], and she returned with her attendants who went along, His Ex. P. Nahaolelua, Col. D. Kalakaua, Hon. P. Y. Kekuaokalani, Hon. A. M. Kahalewai and Mrs. Kalakaua.

Exhibit of paintings.—This past Thursday night, there was a great exhibit of illustrations at the School of the English Mission; there were many portraits shown that night, all of Hawaii’s Alii; and we admired all of the paintings, and they were done with skill; in attendance as well was the Queen.

A Party.—On the evening of Thursday, Reverend G. Mason held a party to honor the Queen, and those who were instructed, and everything carried out at the party was gracious, and the tables were laden with things of all sorts, and we ate until satiated, and a most was leftover. Continue reading

Frank C. Benevedes runs for supervisor, 1917.

Frank C. Benevedes

I am a candidate running for the position of supervisor in the Democratic party. I am Portuguese by birth, but I was born in Kohala, Hawaii, therefore, I am Hawaiian, without anyone denying this; I have many children in Hawaii who live here as their homeland and will lie in my dear land that I love.

I am a laborer, and work for the good of the laborers at all times, and thereby for the public, without regard for that but for equality.

Give your ballots for me this coming Saturday. I am your son, O Hawaii, to be proud of. Grant me an olive branch of aloha.

(Aloha Aina, 5/25/1917, p. 2)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 21, Aoao 2. Mei 25, 1917.

Edward Hopkins runs for Sheriff, 1917.

Edward Hopkins.

Candidate for Sheriff.

As I announce my candidacy for Sheriff on the Republican Ballot in the upcoming Election Season, I would like to make clear that I stand on the platform of good, and should I be elected, I will carry out all things so that everyone will be pleased. I ask humbly for your support.

(Puuhonua o na Hawaii, 5/25/1917, p. 4)

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Ka Puuhonua o na Hawaii, Buke IV, Helu 21, Aoao 4. Mei 25, 1917.

A mele composed by Mary Jane Montano for the fourth anniversary of the Outdoor Circle, 1916.

HONOLULU, OUR FAIRY LAND

A feature of yesterday’s birthday luncheon of the Outdoor Circle was the reading of a Hawaiian poem, written by Mrs. Mary Jane Kulani F. Montana [Montano], author of the verses of “The Old Plantation,” and dedicated to the Circle. The original verses and an English translation were read by Mrs. Webb. These were:

HONOLULU AINA KUPUA.

I.

I ka puu wau o Manoa,
I ka wai ola a Kanaloa,
E kilohi i ka nani punono
O Honolulu Aina Kupua.
Ua nani mai ka uka a ke kai
He mele aloha i ana ka puuwai,
Me he ala e i mai ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua.

II.

Ua kini a lau na pua,
Kumoana la i kanahele,
Kanahele ohai pua ala,
I kanu ia e na lima aulii.
Aloha i ke oho o ka niu,
I ka holu nape i ke ehu kai,
Me he ala e i aku ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua. Continue reading

A name song for Lawrence M. Judd by Mary Padigan, 1929.

Chant For Judd Will Be Feature Of Inauguration

Original Tribute In Music Sings Praises of Next Governor

A feature of the musical program to be given at the reception on the day of the inauguration of Lawrence M. Judd as governor of Hawaii will be the singing of a chant composed in Judd’s honor by Mrs. Mary Padigan.

The chant will be sung in Hawaiian by the Johanna Wilcox singing girls. The English of the chant was written by Miss Johanna N. Wilcox, assisted by David Kalauokalani, George P. Mossman, Charles K. Notley, Eben P. Low, William E. Miles and Simeon Akaka. The Hawaiian and English versions follow:

HE INOA NO KAUKA

Kaulana mai nei oe e Kauka
Keiki hanau o ka aina.

Na ke kalaunu o Hawaii nei
Hapai ae a kau i ka hano.

Hanohano o Kauka e ku nei
Ika pane poo o ke aupuni.

Ua like a like me kauwila
Kaanapu i ka maka o ka Opua.

A he pua nani oe no ka aina
A ka lehulehu ae lei mau ai. Continue reading