A name song for Lawrence M. Judd by Mary Padigan, 1929.

Chant For Judd Will Be Feature Of Inauguration

Original Tribute In Music Sings Praises of Next Governor

A feature of the musical program to be given at the reception on the day of the inauguration of Lawrence M. Judd as governor of Hawaii will be the singing of a chant composed in Judd’s honor by Mrs. Mary Padigan.

The chant will be sung in Hawaiian by the Johanna Wilcox singing girls. The English of the chant was written by Miss Johanna N. Wilcox, assisted by David Kalauokalani, George P. Mossman, Charles K. Notley, Eben P. Low, William E. Miles and Simeon Akaka. The Hawaiian and English versions follow:

HE INOA NO KAUKA

Kaulana mai nei oe e Kauka
Keiki hanau o ka aina.

Na ke kalaunu o Hawaii nei
Hapai ae a kau i ka hano.

Hanohano o Kauka e ku nei
Ika pane poo o ke aupuni.

Ua like a like me kauwila
Kaanapu i ka maka o ka Opua.

A he pua nani oe no ka aina
A ka lehulehu ae lei mau ai. Continue reading

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Kauka Judd opens a clinic for Hawaiians, 1871.

Treatment for Hawaiians.

On the 10th of July, I will commence at my place. Number 31, Fort Street, Honolulu, a Clinic for Hawaiian, men, women, children, everyone; with any illness, from Hawaii to Kauai. These are the hours for you all to come by, from 9 o’clock in the morning until 12 on weekdays [la noa]. Therefore, come all; there is no pay for the indigent, and you will get proper medicine with enlightened treatment.

G. P. Judd, (Kauka.)

[Although the title of this advertisement, “Lapaau Hawaii,” can be seen as “Treatment for Hawaiians,” I think the first idea that comes to mind would be “Hawaiian Medicine.” I wonder if that was done on purpose…]

(Au Okoa, 7/20/1871, p. 2)

Lapaau Hawaii.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VII, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Iulai 20, 1871.

New Hawaiian Language Textbook, 1939.

Hawaiian Language Book

A BOOK EDITED BY HENRY P. JUDD

A book completed in the Hawaiian language is being published by the press next month.

It was written by Rev. Henry P. Judd (Kauka), a professor of the Hawaiian language at the University of Hawaii.

The writing and editing took two years, and it was 30 years of learning and practicing of the language.

Kauka (Judd) says there are three sections to this book. The first part is the studying and the giving of rules of Hawaiian expression; the second is reading lessons; and the third is the translation of 3,000 words.

Mr. Judd has taught and travelled here and there in the islands obtaining what he was after. His kupuna came to Hawaii nei 111 years ago, and therefore, he has the appropriate place for his work. Every Sunday, he gives his sermons in Hawaiian to Hawaiians in Kaneohe.

He gained his knowledge and proficiency in the Hawaiian language through his becoming a translator [Maheleolelo] in the courts, the [Evangelical] Conferences, and other gatherings.

This book is being published by the Newspaper Company of Honolulu, that is the Star-Bulletin of Honolulu.

With Mr. John F. G. Stokes, one of the first trustees of the Bishop Museum, Mr. Judd is now in the process of making a word list in English and Hawaiian, which will be completed in a few months.

[This is referring to the book: Judd, Henry P. The Hawaiian language. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd., 1939.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 7/26/1939, p. 1)

Ka Buke Olelo Hawaii

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIV, Number 13, Aoao 1. Iulai 26, 1939.

More on Hawaiian Independence Day and Aloha Aina, 1843.

THE ANT [KA NONANONA].

“Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise.” Proverbs [Solomona]

Book 2. HONOLULU, OAHU, JANUARY 17, 1843. Paper 17.

Here are some letters from Haalilio; people will surely be happy to hear from him and Mr. Richards that their travels are going well.

Weletabu [Vera Cruz ?], Mexico, Nov. 2, 1842.

Dr. G. P. Judd,

My dear friend, much aloha to you and your entire household. Here am I, your friend, with feeling aloha for you. The two of us [Haalilio and Richards] arrived here on the 29th of October, and we are awaiting a ship to ride. Hear me, I am doing fine, I have no illness; my health is fine now. However, I do not know how it will be when we get to the cold lands; perhaps it will be alright, and perhaps not. Hear me, we have travelled about this expansive land with peacefully, we were not troubled, we were cared for well by the Lord, until arriving here. But our bodies are spent after the long road. The days were extremely hot and extremely cold; we got drenched by the rain and snow, we passed through mountains, and rivers, and the wilds here in Mexico; we swam the water of rivers running by the face of the mountains, during the day and the night. In the cold and the heat, we endured hunger, riding on the backs of mules all day long. But I was certain that Jesus was with us in this friendless land. And that he blesses us. He takes care of the two of us, and our bodies are not troubled or hurt. He supplies us with all of our needs. He has welcomed us always amongst good friends; and there, we were given comfort and help on our path.

Listen to this, I’ve seen the towns of these lands; they are countless, and I have seen Mexico the great Town of the president [alii]. I’ve also seen the silver mines, and how they work silver; we’ve been to the legislature of the alii and his residence. Those places are grand to see. And today I am with health, giving my aloha to you and your wife and the children; give your [my?] aloha to all the friends there, and to Hana folks and to your people and to my household, and to the land and to the chiefs.

Aloha between us, Let us live through the Lord; until we meet in joy once more.

Timoteo Haalilio.

Mexico, Weletabu [Vera Cruz ?], Nov. 8, 1842.

O D. [G.] P. Judd,

Much Aloha to you; we received your letter on this day, the 8th of Nov., 1842. And we’ve understand all that was within. I have much aloha for you, and for all of you. How sad for all the alii, and how sad for Kapihi! We have been blessed this day in seeing your letter. There is much aloha for us all and our homeland. We are travelling aboard the American warships, Falmouth [Falamaka], to New Orleans [Nuolina]. A steam-powered American warship arrived, a huge vessel, 247 feet long and 2,400 tons. As I watch her sail by steam, it is a fantastic sight; she is so swift, with no comparison; this is the first time I’ve seen a steamer, and I am totally captivated by it.

Much aloha for you; here we are safe, steadfast in our duties we swore to.

Aloha to you.  T. Haalilio.

The two of them are headed to Washington aboard the steamer, a warship named Missouri, and perhaps they will land in Washington in 9 days.

[Does anyone know if Weletabu in Mexico is Vera Cruz, or if it is somewhere else?

Also, who is the Hana and the Kapihi mentioned here?]

(Nonanona, 1/17/1843, p. 81)

Eia mai kekahi mau palapala no Haalilio mai...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 17, Aoao 81. Ianuari 17, 1843.

Correspondences between Paulet and the Hawaiian Government. 1843.

ON THE LOSS OF THE KINGDOM.

Here are the documents illuminating how the Kingdom was lost to the Queen of Britain. The 25th of February was the day the cession was proclaimed.

[See on Google Books: British and Foreign State Papers, starting on page 1023. These correspondences were translated from English into Hawaiian, and from Hawaiian into English by Gerrit Parmele Judd (Kauka), the Secretary and Translator of the Kingdom.]

(Nonanona, 3/7/1843, pp. 97–100.)

NO KA LILO O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 97. Maraki 7, 1843.

ke ai ka hoomalu ana...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 98. Maraki 7, 1843.

Honolulu, Oahu, Feb. 18, 1843.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 99. Maraki 7, 1843.

olelo maluna, aole hoi na kekahi kanaka...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 100. Maraki 7, 1843.

Smallpox brought by the Meifoo, 1881.

Smallpox in Honolulu nei.

O Hawaiian Nation, the steamship “Meifoo” from China, entered into Honolulu Harbor, and within its passengers, there are six Chinese who are suffering from that frightful annihilating disease of 1853–4, that illness that took ten-thousand of our beloved people. There are two of them with the disease that are very bad, and four will perhaps live.

We understand the the Board of Health has decided to quarantine the sick at the hospital at Kahakaaulana, and for those that are not sick, to quarantine them at Kakaako, while detaining the agents of the ship to pay all expenses should the disease spread here after.

We call out to our beloved nation, let us watch out for ourselves, and let us not associate much with these foreigners, for the time for concern has come upon our nation, because this disease was brought here and it is at our own door. Should we be saved, it is only through the love of the Almighty.

Do recall, O Leaders of our Nation, as well as the members of the Board of Health, that the cabinet of Gerrit P. Judd [Kauka] was ended because of this, and we fear that maybe there will be one that follows the first one in the very near future. Only time will tell.

As we were returning to print the paper for today, it was heard that Smallpox appeared in the body of a haole boy of this town. Here is a query, a question: what of this?

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 2/5/1881, p. 2)

Ka Mai Puupuu Samola Poki ma Honolulu nei.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 6, Aoao 2. Feberuari 5, 1881.