A name song for Lawrence M. Judd by Mary Padigan, 1929.

Chant For Judd Will Be Feature Of Inauguration

Original Tribute In Music Sings Praises of Next Governor

A feature of the musical program to be given at the reception on the day of the inauguration of Lawrence M. Judd as governor of Hawaii will be the singing of a chant composed in Judd’s honor by Mrs. Mary Padigan.

The chant will be sung in Hawaiian by the Johanna Wilcox singing girls. The English of the chant was written by Miss Johanna N. Wilcox, assisted by David Kalauokalani, George P. Mossman, Charles K. Notley, Eben P. Low, William E. Miles and Simeon Akaka. The Hawaiian and English versions follow:

HE INOA NO KAUKA

Kaulana mai nei oe e Kauka
Keiki hanau o ka aina.

Na ke kalaunu o Hawaii nei
Hapai ae a kau i ka hano.

Hanohano o Kauka e ku nei
Ika pane poo o ke aupuni.

Ua like a like me kauwila
Kaanapu i ka maka o ka Opua.

A he pua nani oe no ka aina
A ka lehulehu ae lei mau ai. Continue reading

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Great rally against annexation, 1897.

GREAT GATHERING OF THE PEOPLE

—:FOR THE:—

PROTESTING OF ANNEXATION!

AT THE

Palace Square

ON THIS

FRIDAY NIGHT, OCTOBER 8

7 O’CLOCK p. m.

By this, summoned are all those who are against annexation to gather at the Palace Square, Honolulu, in the evening of Friday, Oct. 8, 1897, at 7 o’clock, to pass a Memorial (Petition) protesting the passing of the bill of annexation, by which they want to join Hawaii to the United States of America.

The invitation is extended to all of the makaainana.

By the summons of the Citizens’ Committee [Komite o ka Lehulehu],

F. J. Testa,
J. K. Kahookano,
C. B. Maile,
S. K. Kamakaia,
S. K. Pua.

—————

We are the two whose names appear below, and from the side of the Hawaiian Patriotic League and Hawaiian Political Association, by this we support and approve the call above, and we summon all the members of those associations mentioned above to go.

James Keauiluna Kaulia,
President of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.

David Kalauokalani,
President of the Hawaiian Political Association.

(Aloha Aina, 10/9/1897, p. 7)

HALAWAI LAHUI NUI

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 41, Aoao 7. Okatoba 9, 1897.

James Keauiluna Kaulia and David Kalauokalani, 1897.

HAWAIIANS EMPHATICALLY OPPOSED TO ANNEXATION.

As president of the Hawaiian Patriotic League of the Hawaiian Islands, I honestly assert from an intimate knowledge of the Hawaiian people that they, men and women, as a race and nation, are emphatically opposed to the annexation of Hawaii to the United States of America or to any other nation.
We love our independence too dearly.
JAMES KEAUILUNA KAULIA.
I, as president of the Hawaiian Political Association of the Hawaiian Islands; affirm and indorse the statement of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.
DAVID KALAUOKALANI.

[Check out the latest in the four-part series by the Hawaiian Patriots Project.

James Keauiluna Kaulia.

And previously:

George Helm and Alice Kamokila Campbell.

And coming up in the near future on the 16 of September, Piilani (the wahine of Kaluaikoolau).]

(San Francisco Call, 9/24/1897, p. 2)

HAWAIIANS EMPHATICALLY OPPOSED TO ANNEXATION.

The San Francisco Call, Volume LXXXII, Number 116, Page 2. September 24, 1897.

Kalauokalani ad in English, 1914.

To the Voters

CITY AND COUNTY OF HONOLULU.

I hereby announce myself a candidate for the nomination as

City and County Clerk

according to the rules and platform of the Republican party.

D. KALAUOKALANI, JR.

[If the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers were rescanned clearly, there would not only be clearer text, but there would also be clearer pictures!]

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/11/1914, p. 11)

To the Voters...

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXII, Number 6996, Page 11. September 11, 1914.

Commission carrying the anti-annexation petitions, 1897.

THE APPEARANCES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES ARE FINE.

We have just seen in the newspaper the “Call” of San Francisco, portraits of the Representatives of the Lahui which were published in that newspaper, with appreciation and delight. Looking closely at all four of their portraits, they each appear fine and dignified, as if those are truly them from top to bottom; there is nothing for the eye to criticize. Also, that newspaper reports of their safe arrival, as well as a conversation of some of the Representatives with a reporter of the newspaper about annexation.

On their sides are portraits of Senators R. F. Pettigrew and Dubois, and both of their stories, from their arrival in Honolulu on the way to Japan, all the way to their return to America. Both of them are true friends to the Hawaiian, wherever they went and came in contact with our native people, but it will be the Senate that will confirm the truth of the words they planted in the hearts of the true Hawaiian people; we hope that the true outcome of their efforts for the good of the land, the people, and the Monarchy arises, and may God in His endless patience bolster their endeavors and progress, so that the journey of our Representatives is helped along. Let Hawaii live forever.

[See the issue of the San Francisco Call (11/28/1897, pp. 1 & 2) referred to in this article here.]

(Aloha Aina, 12/11/1897, p. 2)

ULUMAHIEHIE NA HELEHELENA O NA ELELE.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 11, 1897.