Anna Berry, daughter of Kentucky congressman, speaks on annexation, 1898.

THE INJUSTICE OF ANNEXATION

As Viewed by an American Woman Miss Anna E Berry of Newport—The Kentucky Congressman’s Daughter Writes Entertainingly of the Native Hawaiians—A Petition to the President.

[Among the ladies who accompanied the congressional party to Hawaii in September was Miss Anna Berry, daughter of Congressman Berry of Kentucky, who has written charmingly of the islands. She brought back many souvenirs of her visit, which are to be seen in her Newport home. The best of all is the Royal Hawaiian standard, the flag which was floating over Queen Liliuokalani when she was deposed. It is to be noted that Miss Berry returned to America with a woman’s sense of the injustice of annexation, from the viewpoint of the native Hawaiian, while the men of the party came back a unit for annexation. The Hawaiian minister to whom Miss Berry refers as a descendant of a Kentucky Governor is Rev. Desha, of Hilo. His grandfather was Governor Desha, of Kentucky, and his father was Isaac B. Desha, who committed a sensational murder at Doggett’s Tavern, a well-known inn of early Kentucky days on the Licking River. The murderer was sentenced to death, and saved by his own father’s pardoning power. The case was one of the most remarkable in American criminal history. He fled to Hawaii where one of his half-native sons is a leading Kanaka minister, and the other is a postal employee.—The Editor of the Kentucky Post.

The recent visit of Senator Morgan and four members of the United States House of Representatives to the Hawaiian Islands aroused among the various peoples of the “Paradise of the Pacific” sentiments and feelings as opposite as the poles. There are indeed various peoples in Hawaii—a very scrapbag of a population—the good with the bad. Here Portuguese and Chinese, Japanese and Germans, Americans and natives jostle one another. Continue reading

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San Francisco Call and the military trials, 1895.

THE COURT-MARTIAL OF THE ROYALIST PRISONERS IN THE OLD THRONE ROOM OF THE PALACE.

{Colonel Whiting sits at the head of the table as President. Captain Kinney, Judge Advocate, is at the foot. On one side are Captain Zeigler, Captain Pratt and Lieutenant Jones. Facing them are Lieutenant-Colonel Fisher, Captain Camara and Captain Wilder. From a sketch made in Honolulu expressly for the “Call.”}

[The San Francisco Call had strong ties with Hawaii, and it is interesting to see the articles printed within its pages and how it saw the situation in Hawaii. See for instance the famous story printed a couple of years later: “Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat,” by Miriam Michelson.

…So many unthinkable things took place in the Throne Room of Iolani Palace.]

(San Francisco Call, 2/7/1895, p. 1)

THE COURT-MARTIAL...

San Francisco Call, Volume LXXVI, Number 52, Page 1. February 7, 1895.

Response to Ernest A. Mott-Smith’s Letter in San Francisco Call, 1912.

THE STATE OF LEPROSY IN HAWAII NEI

In the newspaper, the “Call” of San Francisco, of the 14th of August, in a section of that newspaper dealing with Hawaii, is where we saw a very important idea given by Mott-Smith, the secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, describing matters related to Leprosy in Hawaii nei. We understand the thoughts of Mr. Mott-Smith that Leprosy isn’t a contagious disease like what was believed long ago; it is only weakly transmitted. In other words, “Leprosy” is not transmittable from one person to another.

[The article referred to here from the San Francisco Call, “ON GUARD AGAINST DISEASE,” can be found here at Chronicling America.

Also, i could barely read the Aloha Aina article, because the image online is so unclear, as you can see for yourself. There are so many pages like this that need to be shot clearly before it is too late…]

(Aloha Aina, 9/14/1912, p. 1)

KE KULANA MA'I LEPERA MA HAWAII NEI

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 37, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 14, 1912.

Kawaihau Orchestra and Glee Club in SF. 1905.

HAWAIIAN MUSICIANS HEARD IN EXCELLENT PROGRAMME

Kawaiahau Orchestra and Glee Club Delights Large Audience With Singing and Playing.

The Kawaiahau Orchestra and Glee Club of Honolulu gave a delightful musicale yesterday afternoon and eveing at Lyric Hall before a large and highly pleased audience. The numbers, both vocal and instrumental, were admirably interpreted and encores were frequent.

The programme was given in the following order:

March, “Marine Band”; solo and chorus, “Kawaiahau” (Kealakai), Keoni Eluene; duet, “Ka Lai Opua” (Malie), Messrs. Kimo and Eluene; flute and solo, “Always” (Bowen), Major Mekia Kealakao [Kealakai]; bass solo, selected, James Kamakani; solo and chorus, “Akahi” (Princess Like Like [Likelike]), James Kulolia; tenor solo, “Kapilina” (Liliu), Kimo Ko; saxophone solo, “Kalai Pohina” (Nape), David Nape; solo, “Malu Ike Ao” (Kalima), Keoni Eluene; waltz, “Hawaiian Melodies” ; hula songs (Manoa); song and chorus, “Aloha Oe” (Queen Liliu), Hawaii Ponoi.

[Because of its location, The San Francisco Call had much Hawaii coverage.]

(San Francisco Call, 10/7/1905, p. 16)

HAWAIIAN MUSICIANS HEARD IN EXCELLENT PROGRAMME

The San Francisco Call, Volume XCVIII, Number 129, Page 16. October 7, 1905.

Commission carrying the anti-annexation petitions, 1897.

THE APPEARANCES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES ARE FINE.

We have just seen in the newspaper the “Call” of San Francisco, portraits of the Representatives of the Lahui which were published in that newspaper, with appreciation and delight. Looking closely at all four of their portraits, they each appear fine and dignified, as if those are truly them from top to bottom; there is nothing for the eye to criticize. Also, that newspaper reports of their safe arrival, as well as a conversation of some of the Representatives with a reporter of the newspaper about annexation.

On their sides are portraits of Senators R. F. Pettigrew and Dubois, and both of their stories, from their arrival in Honolulu on the way to Japan, all the way to their return to America. Both of them are true friends to the Hawaiian, wherever they went and came in contact with our native people, but it will be the Senate that will confirm the truth of the words they planted in the hearts of the true Hawaiian people; we hope that the true outcome of their efforts for the good of the land, the people, and the Monarchy arises, and may God in His endless patience bolster their endeavors and progress, so that the journey of our Representatives is helped along. Let Hawaii live forever.

[See the issue of the San Francisco Call (11/28/1897, pp. 1 & 2) referred to in this article here.]

(Aloha Aina, 12/11/1897, p. 2)

ULUMAHIEHIE NA HELEHELENA O NA ELELE.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 11, 1897.

Excerpts of “Strangling Hands…” appearing in the Hawaiian-Language Newspaper. 1897.

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

[This article is taken from the famed “Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat” article by Miriam Michelson, which appears in the San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3. The introductory paragraphs go:]

For the benefit of our readers, we are taking some ideas printed in the newspaper San Francisco Call, written by the pen of Miss Miriam Michelson, on the deck of the ship, Australia, on the 22nd of September.

Remember that this woman newspaper reporter was the woman reporter present at the meeting of the Patriotic League of Hilo held at the meeting house of the Salvation Army in Hilo Town, and this is what she reported: . . .

(Aloha Aina, 10/16/1897, pp. 6 & 7.)

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 6. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Mai ka aoao eono mai.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 7. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat. 1897.

STRANGLING HANDS UPON A NATION’S THROAT.

[This is the famous article by Miriam Michelson who went to Hilo and wrote of an anti-annexation petition drive held there.]

(San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3.)

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-2/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/