Kuhio talks to the Sana Lui graduates, 1918.

KUHIO EXPRESSES HIS THOUGHTS

Honolulu, July 8.—At a party given by the Saint Louis Alumni Association [Hui Haumana Mua o Sana Lui], that was in the evening of this past Sunday, Representative Kuhio was invited to speak before that banquet, and he spoke without mincing his words. He strongly criticized W. R. Farrington and Frank Atherton, the owners of the Star-Bulletin newspaper, and called that newspaper, “A newspaper for the rich,” Continue reading

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On the Kauikeolani Children’s Hospital, 1914.

ASSISTANCE WANTED FOR THE HOSPITAL.

Because of a shortage of funds at the Kauikeolani Children’s Hospital, everyone living in this town is asked to give their assistance, as they are able, as per a flyer composed by the trustees of the hospital by way of W. O. Smith, the treasurer, and E. A. Mott-Smith, the chairman of the house committee.

From the inception of this children’s hospital until this past September, the number of patients hospitalized there reached about 1812, and most of them were in great difficulty.

The number of patients at the hospital in 1911 reached about 261; in 1912 there were 272; in 1913 there were 420; and this year, up until the 13th of October, there were 503.

With the proceeds, the expenses to run this hospital can be paid off until the end of the year; there is no way that there would be enough other than through receiving contributions from the public.

(Kuokoa, 11/13/1914, p. 4)

MAKEMAKE I MAU KOKUA NO KA HALEMA'I.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LII, Helu 46, Aoao 4. Novemaba 13, 1914.

Response to Ernest A. Mott-Smith’s Letter in San Francisco Call, 1912.

THE STATE OF LEPROSY IN HAWAII NEI

In the newspaper, the “Call” of San Francisco, of the 14th of August, in a section of that newspaper dealing with Hawaii, is where we saw a very important idea given by Mott-Smith, the secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, describing matters related to Leprosy in Hawaii nei. We understand the thoughts of Mr. Mott-Smith that Leprosy isn’t a contagious disease like what was believed long ago; it is only weakly transmitted. In other words, “Leprosy” is not transmittable from one person to another.

[The article referred to here from the San Francisco Call, “ON GUARD AGAINST DISEASE,” can be found here at Chronicling America.

Also, i could barely read the Aloha Aina article, because the image online is so unclear, as you can see for yourself. There are so many pages like this that need to be shot clearly before it is too late…]

(Aloha Aina, 9/14/1912, p. 1)

KE KULANA MA'I LEPERA MA HAWAII NEI

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 37, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 14, 1912.