Hula in Philadelphia? 1917.

HAWAIIAN HULA IN PHILADELPHIA, AMERICA

At a party given in Philadelphia some weeks ago, according to news received, the thing that was most delightful was the Hawaiian hula portion. Continue reading

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Charles E. King’s “Prince of Hawaii,” 1925.

THE OPERA FOR THE PRINCE OF HAWAII.

In the Liberty Theater, beginning on the night of the 4th of the coming month of May, until the 9th, shown will be an opera for the very first time, called the Prince of Hawaii, under the direction and management of Mr. C. E. King.

In this first opera of Hawaii nei, selected was Raymond Kinney, as the prince of Hawaii; Joseph Kamakau, the king; Rose Tribe, the queen; and Harriet Beamer, as the princess. Others who were selected are Judge John R. Desha and Johanna Wilcox. Continue reading

A mele for Lunalilo Home by historian George Pooloa, 1928.

A MORSEL FROM LUNALILO HOME

Mr. Jonah Kumalae,

Aloha Oe:—Please allow me some open space of your precious, Ke Alakai o Hawaii, for a while.

The one named Chief William Charles Lunalilo was the sixth of the kings, chosen by Hawaii nei on the 8th of January, in the year 1873, and he reigned as king over the nation of Hawaii nei. And after one year and twenty-five days, he died on the 3rd of February, in the year 1874, at Iolani Palace, mauka of King Street. The one named Chief William Charles Lunalilo, was the one who was very generous, willing the trustees of his estate to give from his property in the crown lands for Lunalilo Home as a home for his own Hawaiian people to live in peace for all times at Makiki; Captain Harry Swinton [Hale Pinao] was appointed superintendent of Lunalilo Home, a man who was a well known to the multitudes, and after him there were five haole, and with the last, Lunalilo Home was razed, and the land lay barren. Continue reading

Mrs. Ellen Lake Kahalekai passes, 1916.

A REMEMBRANCE OF MRS. KAHALEKAI.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please insert in an empty space of your newspaper for my dearly beloved wife who left in the night, that being Mrs. Ellen Lake Kahalekai, on the 30th of October, 1916.

She was born at Kipahulu, Maui on the 6th of July, 1881, and her parents were William Lake and Hana Kunukau Lake; and she was cared for in Waihee until she was grown, until she went to school in Waihee.

We attended the same school for many years, and she was educated for a short time at the old Maunaolu School.

She was one of the beautiful rose buds that blossomed there. We were married by Rev. Kapu at Waihee on the 14th of March, 1899, and we lived in Spreckelsville for three years, and we had one of our daughters on the 10th of March, 1900. Continue reading

Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.

Marble memorial to Lorenzo Lyons, 1886.

A CALL TO THE SUNDAY SCHOOLS ALL AROUND THE ARCHIPELAGO.

By the kindness of the Father, God, and Lord Jesus Christ, taken from the circle of our living was our dearly beloved father, Rev. L. Laiana, and he left behind his benevolent works for which our people are greatly indebted, as a monument [kia hoomanao] before our eyes, and before all of the Sunday School students around the Archipelago [Pae Aina].

Therefore, at the meeting of your Executive Committee [Komite Hooko], held on the 9th of November, at Kaumakapili, it was unanimously decided to erect a Marble Monument for the father, Rev. L. Laiana, and to enclose it in a fine iron fence.
Continue reading

Happy Birthday, Aunty! 2016.

DON’T BE INDIFFERENT TO GOOD WORKS.

Patience Wiggin is a Japanese baby who is two years old. She was born on Kauai. There are many children in her family, and ten days after the birth of this little girl, her mother passed away. Her father is poor. After fighting with destitution and troubles, he returned the tiny girl to the Children’s Hospital, for he knew he could not care for this child.

The news was told to Miss Lucy Ward about Patience. Her job is to find homes for children like this small girl. So she began to go around searching for a home. She found Mrs. Wiggin, a Hawaiian, who wanted to adopt [hookama] a child. Mrs. Wiggin’s mind was delighted to find a baby of a different ethnicity, and welcomed in Patience. So the young girl gained a fine home and a kind mother.

The Humane Society is one of 23 associations that is provided with funds that are collected for United Welfare [Pono Lokahi] drive. This is something which promotes good will between the different ethnicities of Hawaii nei, and it will provide homes for Japanese orphans and also for children of other races.

Efforts to raise funds will begin on November 28 and continue for two days. This year the goal to be collected is $275,000, and from that sum, the Humane Society will receive $2211.

[For and earlier post, click here. And for even more on Aunty, click here.

If it wasn’t for the young girl in the story, I certainly would not be doing this blog. Hauoli la hanau e Aunty Pat! O KU O KA!!]

(Kuokoa, 11/25/1921, p. 4)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIX, Helu 47, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1921.