Concert given to raise money for the Ida Pope Memorial Fund, 1920.

GREAT CONCERT

The students who previously graduated from Kamehameha are putting on a great Concert at the Japanese Theater which stands on Mooheau Street in the evening of this coming Satruday, and it will be under the direction of Mrs. Helen Desha Beamer, and is being given for the benefit of the Ida Pope Memorial Fund [Waihona Hoomanao o Miss Pope]. Continue reading

E please mai hoi oe, e ke aloha, 1920.

Those who are in debt in paying for the life of our Hoku newspaper, please keep its life in mind for the upcoming year. The cost of the paper used to print the Hoku is rising, and it is only fair for the people who are in debt to its life remember. Please.

[The subscription rate for the Hoku remained at $2.00 per year for its entire existence. The first privately run newspapers Hoku o ka Pakipika and Nupepa Kuokoa (from the 1860s) both went for that rate as well!

With the times being how they are, first, consider giving donations to food banks and organizations that are providing help to those in need physically and emotionally, and then second, perhaps consider giving a donation to the Library & Archives at Bishop Museum who care for much of the old newspapers and so much more history of Hawaii nei.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/16/1920, p. 4)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIV, Helu 30, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 16, 1920.

Hilo High and Hilo Union to sew masks? 1919.

SCHOOL GIRLS MAY MAKE FLU MASKS

Since the appeal from the local chapter of the Red Cross was made through the columns of the Post-Herald for more workers to help make Flu masks, a suggestion has been made that the Red Cross might be able to obtain valuable assistance if the Hilo High School and the Union School girls of the higher grade were appealed to give one hour, daily, after school hours, to the making of masks. Continue reading

Pertaining to the luau at the Kapiolani Maternity Home, 1894.

A THANK YOU.

At the meeting of the Hoola Lahui Society [Hui Hooulu a Hoola Lahui] held at Kapiolani Home on the 4th of April, 1894, it was decided that the Secretary of the Society will put these words of appreciation before the public: Continue reading

Charles Reed Bishop honored at Kamehameha Schools, 1946.

Arrived 100 Years Ago

Kamehameha To Honor Memory Of C. R. Bishop

Charles Reed Bishop, a builder of Hawaii in the field of education as well as business during the 19th century, and who arrived in the Hawaiian Islands 100 years ago this week, on October 12, 1846, will be remembered at centennial services at the Kamehameha Schools Friday and Saturday. Continue reading

Charles E. King’s “Prince of Hawaii,” 1925.

THE OPERA FOR THE PRINCE OF HAWAII.

In the Liberty Theater, beginning on the night of the 4th of the coming month of May, until the 9th, shown will be an opera for the very first time, called the Prince of Hawaii, under the direction and management of Mr. C. E. King.

In this first opera of Hawaii nei, selected was Raymond Kinney, as the prince of Hawaii; Joseph Kamakau, the king; Rose Tribe, the queen; and Harriet Beamer, as the princess. Others who were selected are Judge John R. Desha and Johanna Wilcox. Continue reading

A mele for Lunalilo Home by historian George Pooloa, 1928.

A MORSEL FROM LUNALILO HOME

Mr. Jonah Kumalae,

Aloha Oe:—Please allow me some open space of your precious, Ke Alakai o Hawaii, for a while.

The one named Chief William Charles Lunalilo was the sixth of the kings, chosen by Hawaii nei on the 8th of January, in the year 1873, and he reigned as king over the nation of Hawaii nei. And after one year and twenty-five days, he died on the 3rd of February, in the year 1874, at Iolani Palace, mauka of King Street. The one named Chief William Charles Lunalilo, was the one who was very generous, willing the trustees of his estate to give from his property in the crown lands for Lunalilo Home as a home for his own Hawaiian people to live in peace for all times at Makiki; Captain Harry Swinton [Hale Pinao] was appointed superintendent of Lunalilo Home, a man who was a well known to the multitudes, and after him there were five haole, and with the last, Lunalilo Home was razed, and the land lay barren. Continue reading

Mrs. Ellen Lake Kahalekai passes, 1916.

A REMEMBRANCE OF MRS. KAHALEKAI.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please insert in an empty space of your newspaper for my dearly beloved wife who left in the night, that being Mrs. Ellen Lake Kahalekai, on the 30th of October, 1916.

She was born at Kipahulu, Maui on the 6th of July, 1881, and her parents were William Lake and Hana Kunukau Lake; and she was cared for in Waihee until she was grown, until she went to school in Waihee.

We attended the same school for many years, and she was educated for a short time at the old Maunaolu School.

She was one of the beautiful rose buds that blossomed there. We were married by Rev. Kapu at Waihee on the 14th of March, 1899, and we lived in Spreckelsville for three years, and we had one of our daughters on the 10th of March, 1900. Continue reading

Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.