Charles E. King’s “Prince of Hawaii,” 1925.

THE OPERA FOR THE PRINCE OF HAWAII.

In the Liberty Theater, beginning on the night of the 4th of the coming month of May, until the 9th, shown will be an opera for the very first time, called the Prince of Hawaii, under the direction and management of Mr. C. E. King.

In this first opera of Hawaii nei, selected was Raymond Kinney, as the prince of Hawaii; Joseph Kamakau, the king; Rose Tribe, the queen; and Harriet Beamer, as the princess. Others who were selected are Judge John R. Desha and Johanna Wilcox. Continue reading

Advertisements

Hula performance, 1911.

Grand Hula

By Annie Hila and Mary Mookini

Tonight and Saturday Night

At Independent Theater, Hotel Street

Best Hula Dancers on the Islands will participate. Fancy Steps from South Se Islanders given. Hawaiian Music

Thomas Passengers! Take This In

Prices: 15c, 25c and 50c

DON’T FORGET THE PLACE—THE INDEPENDENT THEATER

(Evening Bulletin, 11/14/1911, p. 6)

Grand Hula

Evening Bulletin, Established 1882, Number 5083, Page 6. November 14, 1911.

More on “Prince,” 1924.

The Songs of “Prince” Lei Lani Were Just Beautiful

His Falsetto Voice Was Heard at the Concerts He Gave in the Liberty Theater Last Week.

The concerts given by E. K. Rose, known by the stage name “Prince” Lei Lani [Leilani], in the Liberty Theater on the nights of Friday and Saturday, and the afternoon of Saturday of this past week, those were some of the most beautiful concerts, filling all those who attended with delight at hearing in person, the singing voice of this musician of Hawaii nei.

Amongst all of the people who attended to hear his concerts, they said but one thing; that being of their appreciation and desire, not just for all of the different mele sung, but for the loveliness and beauty of his voice, showing that within him are the high talents for which all Hawaiians have pride in him.

For the first time, Honolulu’s people heard singing live along with a phonograph [pahuolelo], auwe, if people weren’t clear about who the singer was on the phonograph, this lack of clarity was put to an end by them hearing the real “Prince” Lei Lani’s voice, being that they were the same in every way.

While the phonograph was playing a song called “Pua Sadinia,” “Prince” Lei Lani sang it in Alto, and it sounded beautiful. “Aloha Oe” was another number played on the phonograph while he sang in alto.

The local singers pale in haole songs, and cannot match the high range of his voice along with the modulation, and yodeling; there is no match, like the voice of a bird.

There was one unfortunate thing in the concert, that was that it was not filled, for there are not many concerts of this sort put on here in Honolulu that are as beautiful.

“Prince” Lei Lani will spend a number of months here in Hawaii nei before turning back to return to America to sing, and while he is here, he will be giving many concerts. He’ll be going to Kauai to perform concerts there, and Kauai’s people are planning a reception for him with excitement.

Other than to sing, he is returning to America, taking with him many photographs of all sorts of places here in Hawaii nei, scenes showing the people of America that Hawaii is a lovely place full of intelligence; not as was shown by some people using ridiculing pictures, saying that Hawaii is in the dark of pagan times.

[I wonder where the pictures ridiculing Hawaii were printed, and who it was that did it.

The internet is pretty amazing. Some ninety years later, we can hear Prince Lei Lani singing “Pua Sadinia” and “Aloha Oe”! Mahalo to cdbpdx for putting it up on youtube!!]

(Kuokoa, 4/10/1924, p. 1)

Nui Ka Nani o Na Mele A Ka "Prince" Lei Lani

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 15, Aoao 1. Aperila 10, 1924.

Voice from the past, 1924.

Prince Lei Lani

(Edwin K. Rose)

One of the Hawaiian singers who is touring all over America, and returned home.

He held a Concert at the Liberty Theater the other night organized by the Hawaiian Protective Association [Ahahui Puuhonua] and the Royal Order of Kamehameha [Ahahui Kamehameha].

There were many Hawaiian songs sung by him which were highly acclaimed by the crowd.

WE ARE SELLING HIS BRAND NEW HAWAIIAN RECORDS, AND WE ARE THE ONLY ONES WHO HAVE THEM.

Put in your orders now.

HAWAII SALES CO., LTD.

Nuuanu mauka near King Street.

Open in the Evenings.

(Kuokoa, 4/10/1926, p. 6)

Prince Lei Lani

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 15, Aoao 6. Aperila 10, 1924.

Another Hawaii Theater Ad, 1920.

COMING! COMING!

AN AMAZING PERFORMANCE

HAWAII THEATER.

Friday, Aug. 13  Saturday, Aug. 14.

“THE HOLE IN THE WALL.”

EPISODE I.

THE MASKED RIDER.

Who, What and How is the Horseman Masked?

There are 30 films that are Amazing, with Fast Action [Puahiohio?] and Chicken skin; the amazing and astonishing acts will be shown weekly, ever increasing in fascination and emotion. Each episode will end with something that will leave you having a hard time breathing, and you will return home unable to sleep thinking about seeing the coming episode.

So too of

KENNETH HARLAN in THE TREMBLING HOUR

Matinees—FRIDAY, 12 M. and 4:30. Evening—Two Showings, 6:30-8:30.

SATURDAY, 10 A. M. and 4:30.

Entrance—15c, 25c, 40c, including war tax [auhau kaua].

[The things you can find on the internet these days! See here for more information on this movie, and a clip!!]

(Kuokoa, 8/13/1920, p. 3)

E HOEA MAI ANA! E HOEA MAI ANA!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVIII, Helu 33, Aoao 3. Augate 13, 1920.

Play of Pele and Lohiau at Hawaii Theater, 1925.

Tableau of the Hawaiian Dramatic Club

The Tableau of Pele and Lohiau shown in the Hawaii Theater [Halekeaka Hawaii] last Friday by the Hawaiian Dramatic Club. The play will be shown at Los Angeles, on the journey of the Royal Order of Kamehameha [Ahahui Kamehameha] for the city day coming up in June.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1925, p. 5)

Tabalo a ka Haw'n Dramatic Club

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 17, Aoao 5. Aperila 23, 1925.

Early Consolidated Amusement and movies on Sundays, 1915.

ASKED FOR APPROVAL TO SHOW MOVIES.

Being that a law was passed in this past legislative session giving the responsibility to the board of supervisors of each county to make laws to approve showing movies on the Sabbath; the Consolidated Amusement Company put a request before the board of supervisors of the City and County of Honolulu at the meeting of that board on this past Tuesday night, to ask for approval to show movies on Sundays.

But the request by that company was placed in the hands of a committee to consider, and to give its findings at the next meeting of the board; however Supervisor Arnold made his opinion clear that the only means by which those sorts of requests will be approved is by making an announcement of the law for which the board will spend much time holding meetings, before it is clear whether or not a law of that kind will pass or not.

From what is understood, Mayor Lane opposes the approval of movies being shown on Sunday, but some of the board members do not disapprove, but they believe that it is more important to give to the public all things that will make them happy on Sundays.

[Consolidated was entertaining Hawaii before 1917? That classic movie trailer we all are familiar with: Consolidated Amusement.]

(Kuokoa, 5/14/1915, p. 5)

NOI E AE IA MAI E HOIKE I KE KIIONIONI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 14, 1915.