Speaking of Prince Kuhio…, 2019.

There is a celebration happening from noon today at the Bishop Museum, marking the 100th year of the Hawaiian Civic Club. Click the image below for more information!

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Charles E. King’s “Prince of Hawaii,” 1925.

THE OPERA FOR THE PRINCE OF HAWAII.

In the Liberty Theater, beginning on the night of the 4th of the coming month of May, until the 9th, shown will be an opera for the very first time, called the Prince of Hawaii, under the direction and management of Mr. C. E. King.

In this first opera of Hawaii nei, selected was Raymond Kinney, as the prince of Hawaii; Joseph Kamakau, the king; Rose Tribe, the queen; and Harriet Beamer, as the princess. Others who were selected are Judge John R. Desha and Johanna Wilcox. Continue reading

Charles Auld, Hula, and Hawaiian Civic Club of Hilo, 1941.

Hawaiian Civic Club

CHAS. AULD

Charles H. (Moa) Auld has been chosen as the new president of the Hawaiian Civic Club [hui Kiwila Hawaii] of Hilo nei, one of the important youths here in Hilo of Hawaiian ancestry.

He was born in Honolulu, and was employed as an inspector of insects in the insects division of the department of agriculture and forestry [papa mahiai ame ululaau], in which he was employed for 10 years. He was educated at the Kamehameha Schools and at Punahou, and he graduated from Punahou in 1926. Thereafter he attended the University of Hawaii. In each of these schools he played football [kinipopo peku wawae].

He is a brother also of Aggie Auld, and expert in Hawaiian hula, and Mr. Auld himself is adept at it as well.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/19/1941, p. 1)

Ka Hui Kiwila Hawaii

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 47, Aoao 1. Malaki 19, 1941.

Hilo Hawaiian Civic Club’s Annual Holoku Ball, 1941.

HOLOKU
BALL

Sponsored by

Hawaiian Civic Club

Scholarship Fund

featuring

CLARA INTER

(HILO HATTIE)

Hilo Hotel —Hilo Armory

April 5, 1941

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/2/1941, p. 4)

HOLOKU BALL

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 49, Aoao 4. Aperila 2, 1941.

Hilo Hattie on her way to Hilo, 1941.

On Her Way

The picture above is of CLARA INTER, the Hawaiian champion of comedy, and she is coming to Hilo nei, for the first time in 26 years, on the 5th of this coming April; and this is when she will be showing her humor before the people of Hilo, and what she was made famous for in America some years ago. She is nicknamed Hilo Hattie.

Clara Inter is part of a Dance [Holoku Ball] put on for the second year by the Hawaiian Civic Club of Hilo [Hui Kiwila Hawaii o Hilo].

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/26/1941, p. 1)

E Hoea Mai Ana

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 48, Aoao 1. Maraki 26, 1941.

Hawaiian Opera, 1925.

Glee Club of Charles E. King

This is a scene from the Opera “Prince of Hawaii” presented at the Liberty Theater on the night of Monday last, continuing its performance until the night of Saturday, May 9. Mr. C. E. King put together this Opera, and there are only talented singers who perform the songs.

There was much lauding of the performance of Monday night, and for that reason, Liberty Theater has been full every night since–not just for the beautiful appearance of the singers, but also because of the beauty of their singing.

The proceeds of this opera will go to funding the education of Hawaiian children; for a scholarship set up by the Hawaiian Civic Club.

[I’m not much into opera, but I still would like to have witnessed this first hand!]

(Kuokoa 5/7/1925, p.1)

Ka Hui Himeni a Chas. E. King

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 19, Aoao 1. Mei 7, 1925.

Kuhio and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs. 1918.

THE PARTY OF HAWAIIANS  WAS FILLED WITH ENTHUSIASM

Hawaiians Gathered at the Young Hotel at the Invitation of Prince Kalanianaole

HEARD WAS IDEAS FOR UNIFICATION

Desired that Hawaiians Stand Together as a People

On the sixth floor of the Young Hotel, at noon this past Tuesday, the Hawaiians of this town gathered for the first time, for a luncheon amid enthusiasm and joy, and this will be a regular thing, like the haole regularly meet at noon on Wednesdays.

This was a meeting organized by Prince Kalanianaole, and Hawaiians of good standing who live here in town were invited to attend, without attention being paid to political affiliation; it is true, many Hawaiians came, and the total number was about seventy-one; and being that this is just the beginning, it will be more full in the future, should this gathering at lunch become a regular thing.

At this meeting was Prince Kalanianaole, the chairman of this meeting and luncheon, and also Mayor Fern, Circuit Judge Heen, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Senators John H. Wise and Charles E. King, Representative Kumalae, Sheriff Charles H. Rose, and some other Hawaiian leaders of town; and everyone gathered there that afternoon seemed spirited to stand shoulder to shoulder, chest to chest, in all things; to lift this lahui from the low level to be equal with the other ethnicities in all aspects.

In order to move forward the agenda for which the Hawaiians gathered at that luncheon, Prince Kalanianaole explained that he greatly wished that the Hawaiian people would think as one, and as a means to that ends, he believes that meeting together in one place by holding regular luncheons of that sort, is where you’d discuss things and hear explanation from different people on all questions regarding the well-being of Hawaiians.

“The great problem seen amongst us, as a people,” according to him, is that we don’t cooperate; we all stand independently, and when we want good works to be done, it is very hard to accomplish for we lack unity and strength.

“Unifying ourselves, and listening to people talk about things that will benefit this lahui is very important for the perpetuation of the lahui; and as we gather regularly at meals of this sort, we will become familiar with each other, and we will hear ideas that should be carried out, and we will be seen as a lahui.”

Some time was spent by Prince Kalanianaole explaining the goals of that gathering while his speech was encouraged by applause, then he called up Circuit Judge Heen to give a few words of clarification before the crowd.

According to him, he was not prepared with a clear topic to talk about, however, he was in agreement with Prince Kalanianaole; all Hawaiians must stand together and work as one in all endeavors that will better themselves as a lahui.

J. Ordenstein, John H. Wise, Charles Achi, Jr., Fred Beckley, Charles E. King, Charles Dwight, Mayor Fern, and Rev. Akaiko Akana were called to explain their overall thoughts as to what is to be done to benefit Hawaiians from here forth.

Rev. Akaiko Akana shared his thoughts; when Hawaiians go back to their traditional occupations [?] and cherish their way of life, that is the only way Hawaiians will be blessed.

The big problem with this lahui, according to him, is the lack of knowledge and readiness to go into business for themselves and so too with being economical; when these important things are acquired by Hawaiians, they will be able to climb to a high level.

Mr. Wise and Mayor Fern were some who spoke of their ideas on the question of leasing a building [?], and their ideas were heard with much enthusiasm.

Before the meeting was adjourned, one idea was approved, to draft a constitution for a club, and to place it in the hands of a committee to lay out the foundation and mission that this association of Hawaiians would carry out.

(Kuokoa, 11/29/1918, p. 1)

PIHA OHOHIA KA PAINA A NA KANAKA HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 48, Aoao 1. Novemaba 29, 1918.