Joseph Puni writes to the father of Diamond Kekona, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN.

Opera House,
Dudley, England,
Nov. 4, 1916.

To my true friend, Dick Kekona,

Aloha oe:–Perhaps you are surprised receiving this letter. I have tried all means to release your beloved son Diamond from the British armed forces. I appeared before the American Consul in the countryside here in England, telling them that Diamond is an American. They responded that they will put my request before the head consul in London. On the 17th of September, I went to the Consulate in London, they told me that the consul could not order the British government to release Diamond because he is 25 years old; only those below 20 years old, if they are American citizens. These past days, I decided to have your daughter-in-law (Amy Kekona) to come to see me, and get together with her to think of a way to release her husband; for these good reasons, I ask that you send me his birth certificate, or to go to the governor of Hawaii to write to the Hawaiian Delegate Mr. J. K. Kalanianaole in Washington D. C., to go to the State Department in Washington and have the American Ambassador in London investigate the circumstances of his enlisting in the armed forces, and you verify that your first-born son is a true Hawaiian. He had a document in the city of Paris, France, from the office of the American General, written on the 13th of February, 1914, attesting to the fact that he is a Hawaiian. If he finds these documents, he will be victorious. Do not neglect this, for I am still regretful not having his acting. He has much knowledge in this area, and his showing this to the world would bring fame to the Hawaiian Lahui. I will organize everything here and send it to London. With our sleuthing, I believe everything will progress; may God watch over and keep safe the life of your child until we meet again, amen.

With aloha to your family and the Hawaiian Nation.

JOSEPH PUNI.

Write me at your daughter-in-law’s, c/o 143 Baxter Ave., Kidderminister, England.

(Aloha Aina, 1/19/1917, p. 3)

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 3, Aoao 3. Ianuari 19, 1917.

New year paniolo entertainment up in Waimea, 1908.

In the contest of tie-down roping [? hookuku hoohei a kulai bipi] held by the boys of Waimea on this past Happy New Year Day at Samuel Parker Ranch [Samuela Paka Ranch], Charles Lindsay took the fastest time of 39 2/5 seconds. That was quick. But if it was a Honolulu cow, it would have taken 2 minutes.

(Na’i Aupuni, 1/2/1908, p. 2)

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke V, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 2, 1908.

Concert given to raise money for the Ida Pope Memorial Fund, 1920.

GREAT CONCERT

The students who previously graduated from Kamehameha are putting on a great Concert at the Japanese Theater which stands on Mooheau Street in the evening of this coming Satruday, and it will be under the direction of Mrs. Helen Desha Beamer, and is being given for the benefit of the Ida Pope Memorial Fund [Waihona Hoomanao o Miss Pope]. Continue reading

“Nohea” and “Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona” being performed, 1920.

Band Concert

The Hawaiian Band will give a concert at 3 o’clock this afternoon in Kapiolani Park, the program for the occasion being the following:

Old Hundred

March—United Liberty, Losey
(a) Mystery, Johnson
(b) Starlight Love, Denni
Song—That Wonderful Mother of Mine, Gooding
Overture—William Tell, Rossini
Songs—Band Glee Club
(a) Nuuanu Waipuna, Major Kealakai
(b) Nohea, Queen Liliu
(c) Uluhua, Robert
(d) Ko Ua kilihune o kona [Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona], Queen Liliu
Clarinet Solo—Somnambula, Thornton
Waltz—Jolly Fellows, Vollstedt
Intermezzo—Elegante, Offenbach
March—Bright Eyes, Hoschna
Hawaii Ponoi
The Star Spangled Banner

(PCA, 12/12/1920, p. 3)

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume LXIII, Number 12170, Page 3. December 12, 1920.

George Makalena and others with the Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show want to come home, 1899.

Hawaiian Rough Riders

Four of the Hawaiians who were with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show are at San Francisco rooming in a big building opposite the Occidental on Montgomery. The boys, who hope to get off for home by Manoa, are: K. Nakea, Hoapili, Kipi and Makalena. Continue reading

Olivia K. Nakea performs on KGU, 1930.

Quartet Sings Old Hymns of Hawaii For Leper Colony

A  program of sacred Hawaiian music will be heard through KGU this evening from 6:10 to 6:30. A mixed quartet under direction of Olivia Nakea will present the first of a series of  songs for “shut-ins” throughout the territory. Continue reading