Maori visitors, 1920.

MAORIS ENTERTAINED

Visiting Maoris were entertained at the armory last night by a number of Hawaiians. The main assembly was well filled and a number of townspeople crowded the galleries. The visitors will be entertained again tonight by Princess Kawananakoa and Wednesday by the Daughters of Hawaii. Continue reading

“Nohea” and “Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona” being performed, 1920.

Band Concert

The Hawaiian Band will give a concert at 3 o’clock this afternoon in Kapiolani Park, the program for the occasion being the following:

Old Hundred

March—United Liberty, Losey
(a) Mystery, Johnson
(b) Starlight Love, Denni
Song—That Wonderful Mother of Mine, Gooding
Overture—William Tell, Rossini
Songs—Band Glee Club
(a) Nuuanu Waipuna, Major Kealakai
(b) Nohea, Queen Liliu
(c) Uluhua, Robert
(d) Ko Ua kilihune o kona [Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona], Queen Liliu
Clarinet Solo—Somnambula, Thornton
Waltz—Jolly Fellows, Vollstedt
Intermezzo—Elegante, Offenbach
March—Bright Eyes, Hoschna
Hawaii Ponoi
The Star Spangled Banner

(PCA, 12/12/1920, p. 3)

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume LXIII, Number 12170, Page 3. December 12, 1920.

George Makalena and others with the Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show want to come home, 1899.

Hawaiian Rough Riders

Four of the Hawaiians who were with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show are at San Francisco rooming in a big building opposite the Occidental on Montgomery. The boys, who hope to get off for home by Manoa, are: K. Nakea, Hoapili, Kipi and Makalena. Continue reading

Olivia K. Nakea performs on KGU, 1930.

Quartet Sings Old Hymns of Hawaii For Leper Colony

A  program of sacred Hawaiian music will be heard through KGU this evening from 6:10 to 6:30. A mixed quartet under direction of Olivia Nakea will present the first of a series of  songs for “shut-ins” throughout the territory. Continue reading

Charles E. King critique of “modern” Hawaiian music, 1939.

King Says Hawaiians Ruining Island Music

Venerable Charles E. King, whose Song of the Islands is among the most widely known of all Hawaiian music, pulled no punches in a talk before the Hawaiian Civic club today on modern  day treatment of island songs.

“Hawaiian music,” said Mr. King, speaking at the club luncheon at the YWCA at noon, “is being murdered—and by Hawaiians.” Continue reading