May Day in Hilo Town, 1942.

Pertaining to Lei Day

Put on by the Hawaiian Civic Club

The main things on the schedule for Lei Day this year were explained by Wilfred K. Hussey, the president of the Hawaiian Civic Club [kalapu Kiwila Hawaii].

The schedule is being planned out by the committee selected for that work, and chaired by Clifford H. Bowman and assisted by Peter Mehau, Charles Murray, Ernest Fernandez, Johnson Kahili and Charles Auld. Continue reading

No fooling in Lahaina a hundred years ago, 1916.

ALL WERE DELIGHTED

Mr. Sol Hanohano, Aloha oe:—Please allow me some open space on the wings of  the seagull of ours, so the words above have somewhere to nest.

While everyone was sitting around in the shade of the ulu grove of Lele, enjoying the softly blowing Ma-aa breeze, the local wind of the land, the people were surprised to see a notice put up: “Band concert tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock p.m. The Lahaina Public Band will give a public concert under the banyan tree, court house grounds. All welcome! Come one! Come all!”

And being that it was on the 1st of April that this announcement was seen, and the words said that it was the following day at 3 o’clock p.m. that the band would play, Apr. 2, 1916, the announcement was not reliable, because it was the 1st of April, maybe the intent of that announcement is an April Fool; so when going to the place directed, you would find something like the kids saying, “Go to school, tell your teacher you’re a fool,” but for this,  “Go to courthouse grounds, and call yourself you’re a fool!”

But these guesses were put aside until the prescribed time was at hand, and the band members were indeed seen seated in the place made ready for them. And for the first time, the realization came that this was not an April fool.

When the clock struck 3 o’clock, we saw Lowell Kupau bow and as he rose up he was holding his instrument, and with a wink of an eye, the voice of the band burst forth. It was just so lovely! it was a beauty that could not be faulted for they were only taught for a very short few days. The songs played were “Kaua i ka la i pohina,” “Silver Threads Amongst the Gold,” “Maui Beauty me Roselani,” composed by William J. Coelho. “Maui no ka oi,” composed by Rev. S. Kapu, “Mai poina oe ia’u,” and “Aloha oe.” “Hawaii Ponoi.” Continue reading

Queen Liliuokalani attends historical play at Kapiolani Park, 1916.

THE PRESENTATION AT KAPIOLANI PARK ABOUT LONOIKAMAKAHIKI AND KAIKILANI WAS BEAUTIFUL

SOME SCENES THAT WERE SHOWN—(1) Kakuhihewa, King of Oahu. (2) The Alii and Kaukau Alii of King Lonoikamakahiki of Hawaii leaving the throne. (3) King Lonoikamakahiki. (4) The Chiefs and Attendants in the Procession. (5) Queen Liliuokalani, and Her Companions watching the Performance. (6) The Attendants of Queen Kaikilani. (7) The Retainers of Queen Kaikilani. Continue reading

American sailors are taught Hawaiian history, 1925.

PLAYS ABOUT KING KAUIKEAOULI.

In the grounds of the palace on the night of Saturday, the 6th of this coming June, there will be pageants put on in the palace grounds pertaining to the rise of King Kauikeaouli  to the throne of Hawaii nei along with the appearance of his entire royal court; this will be arranged by the Mamakakaua Society headed by Mrs. Ahuena Taylor.

The pageant will be held for the benefit of the men of the fleet of American warships while they are spending time in this town, so that they obtain some knowledge of the nature of the governing of Hawaii nei i the time of the kingdom.

There will also be speeches presented that night by selected people, and amongst them is Governor Farrington.

This performance will be open to all, without charge; and if there are concerns amongst the Hawaiians that they will be charged, put an end to your worries by going down and witness everything that will be shown at that time.

(Kuokoa, 5/28/1925, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1925.

Kaili Trio performing at Kauai’s Tip Top Theatre, 1922.

THE 4 HORSEMEN of the APOCALYPSE

with a Six Piece Orchestra

playing the music which was written especially for this picture.

The Four Horsemen is considered to be the most wonderful photo-play ever filmed and the music will add materially to its enjoyment. DO NOT FAIL TO SEE THIS ATTRACTION

FRIDAY and SATURDAY

PRICES: 25c 50c and $1.00 Reserved Seats now on Sale at the Lihue Store, Phone 641

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8

HAMILTON THEATRICAL CORP. PRESENTS

“The Greatest Truth”

A Paramount Picture

SUNDAY, NOV. 12

ADOLPH ZUKOR PRESENTS

Thomas Meighan in “The Bachelor Daddy”

A Paramount Picture

Wednesday

November 15

“MISTRESS OF THE WORLD

and

“NORTH OF THE RIO GRANDE”

JACK HOLT AND BEBE DANIELS

in

“North of the Rio Grande”

THURSDAY, NOV. 9

The Famous Kaili Trio

in their

Superb Realistic Hawaiian
Vaudeville Production

Featuring their latest Hulas and Popular Songs
See “QUEENIE” in her original Hula-Hula Dance

GENERAL ADMISSION 25 and 75c – – – RESERVED $1.25

Reserved Seats on Sale at the Lihue Store

TIP TOP THEATRE

(Garden Island, 11/7/1922, p. 2)

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The Garden Island, Volume 18, Number 45, Page 2. November 7, 1922.

Ernest Kaai’s Hawaiian Troubadours in New Zealand, 1925.

AMUSEMENTS.

“NIGHT IN HONOLULU.”

The ukulele, the hula-hula, and the steel guitar, as entertaining products of Hawaii, are known all over the civilised world that comes under the influence of vaudeville circuits, but such segregated examples as have hitherto been shown in Auckland are mere museum specimens compared with the living actuality of the performance given in His Majesty’s Theatre on Saturday night by Ernest Kaai’s Hawaiian troubadours. These minstrels exhibited ukulele and guitar with all the sweet setting of their native haunts, the strains of the strings enriched by vocal harmonising in which the Hawaiian exccels, and the harmonising enhanced by quaint falsetto and yodelling effects that thoroughly delighted a house packed to the doors.

The curtain rose on a pretty palm-fringed beach scene, when it could be seen, for the house was in darkness when a harmonious chorus of Hawaiian voices, with stringed instrument accompaniment, was lifted in song to welcome the doming dawn. It was a native harmonising chorus set to music by Queen Liliuokalani, and entitled “Aloha Oe,” which swells to a paean of joy as the rising sun lights up the expectant world—in this case quite an effective stage scene. A similar characteristic effort of voice, strings, and light, symbolising twilight, with the stage fading melodiously into darkness, marked the ending of the first part of the programme, while in between dawn and twilight came a series of novel, interesting and thoroughly entertaining items. An Island folk-song by eddie Kniley, a ballad by Frank Luiz, hula dances by Gertila Byrnes and Layley Leywood, and a steel  guitar selection by Thelma Kaai were given with effective voice and string accompaniments. It was the part-singing in trios, however that most captivated the audience. One such number by David Kaili, Thelma Kaai and Eddie Kinley was emphatically encored, but when Queenie and David Kaili and Thelma Kaai appeared in whimsical part songs in which Queenie appeared as a soubrette of talent with a quaint gift for vocal ornamentation, the house was so vastly entertained and amused that the party were recalled four or five times. Continue reading

Hawaiian music in Aotearoa, 1925.

NEW ZEALAND IS JOYFUL WITH HAWAIIAN MUSIC.

A news item published in the newspaper Auckland Star on the 20th of April past described the enthusiasm of the people of New Zealand for Hawaiian songs, given at the concert held by Ernest Kaai and his band which is going around New Zealand.

When one of the concerts opened in the theater, the interior of the theater was decorated with greenery, and the theater was darkened, and when the music began, accompanied by the voices of the singers, it was as if the scene then was the coming of light at the break of dawn; and the audience held their breath when Aloha Oe was sung, as the instruments played along. Continue reading