May Day is Lei Day in Hilo, 1941.

Day to Don Lei

Tomorrow is a great day here in Hilo; it is the day to wear lei, and everyone will be seen walking on the streets with lei.

Because tomorrow has become the day to wear lei, the Civic Club of Hilo took steps to hold a grand exhibit, and it will be shown to the public.

This event is held every year by this association, and this they expanded it by planing to have a grand entertainment at Kalakaua Square. At the same time, the queen who recently was victorious at the Holoku Ball this past month will preside while those that did not win the contest will be her attendants.

Joining in on the exhibition will also be queens chosen from the various schools of Hilo nei.

There will also be music by the Civic Club Choir, the Hawaiian Women’s Club of Hilo, and the County Band and the Hilo High School Band. Continue reading

Advertisements

Steadfast behind the Lahui, 1896.

LISTEN, O PUA O HAWAII¹.

As a spokesperson for the people, and being that we are all angered by the contemptuous words of the people who stole our beloved land; we continue to protest these acts to this day; therefore, we speak on something we saw which is stealing once again; and that is this:

October 24, Bulletin Newspaper²; the newspaper stated:—Professor Berger of the Government Band [Bana Aupuni] has put a request before all the members of the National Band [Bana Lahui Hawaii] for the boys to agree to give time to teach his musicians to sing; time to sing will be made between the first and second parts and so forth.

And being the boys of the National Band will join with the “Peacock government [aupuni Pikake]³” Band, it shows those on the outside that the two sides have joined together and the disagreements have become as naught.

That is the gist of this report which we saw; and those rights of yours, O Hawaii, will be stolen once again.

Continue reading

Death of Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, 1918.

MY HINANO LEI HAS GONE

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Aloha between the two of us strangers:—May it please your honor to welcome my bundle of hinano lei in a open space of your office and it will be you who carries it to the four corners of this globe, so that the family, friends, and the many people of my dear hinano lei, my husband, will know that he has passed on and that he left me and our beloved lei grieving for him in this world.

On Thursday, July 11, 1918, at 4 p. m., my dear Joseph K. Kaaa grew weary of this life and and silently moved on alone to the other side of the dark river of death, leaving me behind, burdened with our beloved lei. Auwe, how pained is my heart! No more is my dear Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, my companion for all places.

O Kukalahale Rain, you will no longer see his eyes, no more will will hear his voice, and he will not tread upon your streets.

Auwe, my sadness and grief for my dear husban who has gone afar; no more will I see his features; no more will I hear his voice; no more, no more for all times!

Continue reading