George Palakiko William Hookano celebrates his 71st birthday, 1920.

Ka Hoʻolauleʻa La Hanau no George Palakiko William Hookano
71st Birthday Party for George Hookano
by Thelma Chun, Hoolauleʻa Ukulele Club

The Hoolauleʻa Ukulele Club honored their Advisor-Instructor, “Uncle” George Palakiko William Hookano on his 71st birthday, The event was held on Saturday, January 19,1980, five days prior to his actual birthday. Continue reading

Death of James K. Pohina, 1941.

James K. Pohina, 87, Dies; Rites Saturday

James K. Pohina, 87, retired musician and long known as the oldest member of the Royal Hawaiian band, died at 7:10 p. m. Thursday at  the residence at 2116 Ladd lane. Continue reading

Death of Remigius Willam Aylett, 1922.

R. W. AYLETT GREW WEARY OF THIS LIFE.

R. W. AYLETT

After being ill for some months, Remigius William Aylett grew weary of this life at 2:30 in the afternoon of Wednesday last week, at his residence on 10th Avenue in Kaimuki. Continue reading

The Royal Hawaiian Band to lose old-timers, 1920.

WANTS TO RETIRE AND RECEIVE A PENSION.

After working as a musician in the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] for 51 years, James Pohina, one of the oldest persons working with the band, decided he was at a place where he would retire with a pension from the county government. Continue reading

Death of Samuel K. Kamakaia, 1919.

Obituaries

REV SAMUEL K. KAMAKAIA

Following a long illness Rev. Samuel K. Kamakaia, one of the oldest of the “bandboys” of the Hawaiian band, died yesterday morning at 3:30 o’clock at Queen’s Hospital. The funeral will take place a 3 o’clock this afternoon from Williams’ Undertaking parlors, interment to be in Puea Cemetery. Continue reading

Samuel Kamakea Kamakaia’s medal from King Kalakaua to go to Bishop Museum? 1919.

Medal Kalakaua I Gave Sam Kamakaia Passed to Bandsman

A silver medal awarded by King Kalakaua to Sam Kamakaia, who died Monday morning at the Queen’s Hospital, who was formerly a member of the Hawaiian Band, is now in the possession on Malulani Beckley Kahea, also a bandsman, to be retained by him until it may be necessary to transfer it to another bandsman, but according to the dying wish of Kamakaia it is eventually to go to the Bishop Museum. Continue reading

Hawaiian boys playing music in Siberia, 1920.

Hawaiian Minstrels Play For Siberian Wolfhounds

This Hawaiian quartet has just returned after touring Siberia and the far east entertaining Uncle Sam’s doughboys under the auspices of the Knights of Columbus. Left to right —John Oku, Charles Dement (leader), John Hickey and Edward Hanapi. The four left here last November. They played in Japan, Siberia, China and the Philippines. They remained in Vladivostok after the American soldiers had departed and the Japanese had taken over the city. Continue reading

Abraham Palekaluhi celebrates the birthday of King Kalakaua, 1877.

BIRTHDAY OF THE KING COMMEMORATED.

On Friday last week, that being the 16th of this month, in the early morning of the day, the blue of the heavens was seen without being blemished by any clouds; and the day showed in full its joy and bright visage, as if saying: “This is the day that the Royal One Kalakaua was born.” At midday at perhaps 12 noon, A. Palekaluhi spread out a luau table filled with delicacies to satisfy one’s desires.

Continue reading

Thomas Square inauguration, 1887.

Inauguration Concert at Thomas Square

Thomas Square has at last been successfully inaugurated as a public square by the Hawaiian band giving one of its entertainments to a large audience on Thursday evening last. This plot of ground, about seven acres, was donated by the Hawaiian Government as a public square some fifteen years ago, and was named Thomas Square in honor of Admiral Thomas of the British navy, who, in a kindly manner, undid the act of taking possession of these Islands by Lord George Paulet, the British Government endorsing the former and censuring the latter. Shortly after the square was enclosed and trees planted, which was about all that was done until late years, when the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, who takes a lively interest in such matters, Continue reading

May Day is Lei Day in Hilo, 1941.

Day to Don Lei

Tomorrow is a great day here in Hilo; it is the day to wear lei, and everyone will be seen walking on the streets with lei.

Because tomorrow has become the day to wear lei, the Civic Club of Hilo took steps to hold a grand exhibit, and it will be shown to the public.

This event is held every year by this association, and this they expanded it by planing to have a grand entertainment at Kalakaua Square. At the same time, the queen who recently was victorious at the Holoku Ball this past month will preside while those that did not win the contest will be her attendants.

Joining in on the exhibition will also be queens chosen from the various schools of Hilo nei.

There will also be music by the Civic Club Choir, the Hawaiian Women’s Club of Hilo, and the County Band and the Hilo High School Band. Continue reading