Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.

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What was the Bishop Museum Director thinking, 1898.

OLD CANNONS.

When the warship Bennington returned from Kauai, it brought two old cannons from Hanalei, from the place of Judge Thurston [Lunakanawai Kakina], with the thought of the captain that these would be fine objects for the Bishop Museum to display.

He believed that these were cannons from the Russian fort facing Hanalei, but according to Judge Thurston’s statement, they were cannons form the warship of Lunalilo named Haaheo [Haaheo o Hawaii], and it ran aground at Hanalei many years ago.

The director of the Bishop Museum refused to take the guns, and so the captain thinks he will return the guns when he returns to Kauai.

[This was the ship of Liholiho, Kamehameha II, and not Lunalilo. There was much press about it last year! Go check out the exhibit at Kauai Museum on the Haaheo, showing now!! Does anyone know what became of these cannons?]

(Aloha Aina, 12/3/1898, p. 1)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 49, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 3, 1898.

Translation of Edward Lilikalani’s response to the haole Memorial, 1876.

[Translated from the Kuokoa, of Mar. 18.]

The Memorial.

Mr. Editor:—In the Commercial of the last Saturday I observe a matter of importance emanating from foreigners of Honolulu. It is a memorial to the King in respect to repopulation, and mainly advocating the bringing hither of people from India whereby this nation shall be reinvigorated.

 Therein also the King is recommended to seek for information abroad from persons skilled in such matters. This is not, I think, good advice; the real meaning however is a contempt for the Ministers because they have done nothing.

The astonishing thing about this memorial is that the Hawaiian people are entirely left out in so important a matter as a proposition to bring people from a foreign land to increase this nation.

The idea of increasing the nation by bringing people of another country here, is a good one, but it is proper that the Hawaiians themselves should be as well consulted in the matter. But we are altogether thrown on one side; and if the foreigners wish to bring East Indians here to increase without our concurrence or knowledge, it will be altogether wrong. If this is really their intention, thus to treat us like dumb animals, then we had better arise and seriously consider this startling scheme that is being projected among the foreigners.

Know O Hawaiian People! The King’s increase of the nation is the Reciprocity Treaty. When we have got that secured and in operation, then we will consider in regard to getting people from India, Japan, China or Malaysia; provide first something for people to do when they arrive; but if you get laborers now, and East India population, where is the work for them to do or the land to give them.

The impudence and haste of these people is surprising; they appear like a lot of children, fuming and showing their teeth at the Ministers, accusing them and accusing the King of having done nothing. Indeed! and how about the Treaty?

Another surprising thing is that four members of the House of Nobles signed their names to that paper, Messrs. Rhodes, Cleghorn, Smith and Castle. Which of these labored so hard to put the King on the throne, as stated in the memorial? I am of the opinion that the names of some of these persons are those of annexationists, who were strong for the treaty when Lunalilo was King. It is certain that they did not vote for the present King, for they were not then in the Legislature, having only recently been appointed as Nobles. I am of the opinion that they having thus dragged the King’s Ministers into the memorial, it would be well for the King to withdraw their appointments, or better still that they return their patents as Nobles to His Majesty—if it was not for the fact that it would be unconstitutional.

Perhaps they want to become Ministers themselves? Yes, that is so; but if their judgments are thus perverted, they are unfit for the Ministerial office, for they would by and bye be doing something without consulting the people, and disaster might follow. Let their desires be disappointed, and let the King appoint none but native Hawaiians.

This is a matter for the Legislature to attend to; but as we have not been consulted by the memorialists, it is proper that we should stand and consider what is to be the end of this business.

Respectfully,  Edward Lilikalani.

[Here is a translation of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani’s response to the repopulation memorial that was printed in the Kuokoa on 3/18/1876.]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 3/25/1876, p. 3)

The Memorial.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XX, Number 39, Page 3. March 25, 1876.

Joseph Emerson interrupts meeting at the Kapuukolo Church, 1893.

DEVOTIONS DISTURBED.

Disruption of a Prayer Meeting With Political Dynamite.

A Visitor Miscalculates Hawaiian Feeling On Affairs.

The members of the little native church at Kapuukolo near the Fish Market held their regular prayer meeting yesterday evening. As is usual at these meetings a subject was proposed for discussion among members. The subject was, “Whether it is right to worship two Gods?” Argument was going along peacefully when Mr. Jos. Emerson entered the church and, after listening a little while, asked to be allowed to take part in the discussion. Mr. E. was given permission and spoke for some time, finally bringing in the name of the dethroned Queen and reflecting on her career. Among other remarks he is said to have referred to stories that the Queen was in the habit of consulting kahunas regarding her chances for restoration to the throne.

 Some of the congregation arose in a body and demanded that Mr. E. close his mouth or he would be summarily removed. S. Kaloa, a native preacher, then addressed the meeting, saying that a committee of church members had had communication and meetings with her Majesty during a year past, and she had told them emphatically she did not believe in kahunas. Now here came a foreigner and told them that she was harboring them. Who would they believe, this man or their committee, who has been in constant communication with the Queen?

Mr. E. asked all who were in favor of the Queen returning to the throne to stand up. All stood up with the exception of five, one a clerk in the office of the Board of Missions.

Kaloa again interfered and asked who dethroned the Queen, was it her people? Another, did Mr. E. consider that the members of the Council, where not a single Hawaiian was present, represented the people?

The argument became hot and finally Mr. Emerson retired and Kaloa held the fort.

A committee from the Church has an advertisement in a native paper calling on all the members to pray to God for the restoration of the Queen.

The foregoing report was gathered by our reporter from several native Hawaiians who was at the meeting. Some of the statements said to have been made by Mr. Emerson have been eliminated on the strength of his emphatic denial that he uttered them. A representative of the Bulletin gained an interview with Mr. Emerson to obtain his side of the story, which is given below:

STATEMENT OF MR. EMERSON.

In answer to questions Mr. Emerson gave in substance the following account of the meeting and his part in it:

 “I had been asked by some of the people to visit their meetings. When I went to the meeting last night I sat for some time listening to the discussion. Then I asked if they would like me to speak on the relations of Christianity with the monarchy, and they said they would.

“I began by telling of the difference between the Hawaiians and the natives of other groups, such as the Marquesas. In those islands tribal wars on single islands were common, while in the early times of the Hawaiian Islands each island had its own king. There were human sacrifices on these islands, but not for the purpose of eating the victims. An advance was made when all the islands were brought under the single rule of Kamehameha I.

“In the time of Kamehameha II., I told them, another great advance was made when Queen Kaahumanu, aided by her priest, threw off the shackles of the tabu and caused the idols to be renounced. Then, until Lot (Kamehameha V.) became King, there was a period free from the old system. Lot began a course of returning to the ancient superstitions.

“With the exception of the brief reign of Lunalilo, I said, down through the reign of Liliuokalani there was a disposition to return to heathen customs. They agreed with me that Kalakaua had gone back toward the ancient superstitions. I mentioned the time when Kaunamano in the presence of King Kalakaua at Kailua advocated a return to the old gods. I said I had heard stories about Queen Liliuokalani’s having sacrificed pigs to Pele at the Volcano, and they probably knew whether these stories were true, and they did not deny their truth.

“Is it true, I then asked, that J. W. Alapai was circulating a petition to have a day of fasting and prayer for the restoration of the Queen? They answered yes. Is it true that Alapai claims to have a unihipili (familiar spirit), and that his wife is the kahu (priestess) of that spirit? They said yes. Is it tre that Alapai is a confessed heathen who is at the same time a luna in Kaumakapili church? To these questions they answered in the affirmative.

“Then, I asked, what should be the attitude of Christian people toward this day of fasting and prayer? Are we to join in with a man who is a pronounced heathen and make no distinction between those who are pronounced opponents of heathenism and those who practice it? Shall we join with Alapai for the return of the Queen to the throne? Can we make common cause with a heathen?

“I did not pronounce my own opinion—I simply drew them out. There was a noisy discussion and some left the room.

“No, I was not threatened to be turned out. I said if my remarks gave offense I should sit down. I shook hands with everyone who had not left the room. My question was, ‘Shall we join with Alapai to pray for the restoration of the Queen?’

“Dr. Emerson, who was also present, tried to conciliate the people. He told them it was right for them to pray for the late Queen’s welfare. They should pray for her soul.

“Yes, I took a vote. There were five who voted against joining with Alapai and three in favor of doing so, but most of those present at the time refrained from voting. The question was not whether they thought the Queen should be restored, but whether it was right to join in a movement to that end with Alapai.”

Mr. Emerson, in answer to a question, admitted that results showed it was injudicious to have introduced the question of restoration at all. Had he known that it would have awakened so much feeling, he said, he would have abstained from questioning the people in the manner described.

[This article was translated in Leo o ka Lahui, 2/9/1893, p. 2. It is interesting that there is a note appended to the end of the translated article that they did not have time to translate Emerson’s response.]

(Daily Bulletin, 2/7/1893, p. 3)

DEVOTIONS DISTURBED.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume V, Number 644, Page 3. February 7, 1893.

More on the “King of the Cannibal Islands,” 1873.

Hoky Poky Wanky Fong.

Minister De Long in Japan has gone back on us. He washes his hands of the isles, and says no more Sandwich for him, as it is too strongly peppered with coolieism to suit his moral stomach. He is the blarneying ambassadorial Barnum, who tried to make a puff and pelf by showing around Mori and the princly Japs; but those chaps, and Mori said no more, do we belong to De Long, and told him to get along. And now this rough in Eastern diplomacy, this bull in a China shop, has to return to his old pastures and stamping grounds; and so, like a retiring politician in our latitudes, he wants to go home with a good record, by throwing overboard heathen Hawaiian. This made our Bohemian sing in this wise:

Oh, have you heard the news of late?
About a canting diplomate,
Who says no Coolies shall be ate
By the King of the Cannibal islands.

Hoky, poky, wanky, fong,
What a canting guy this old De Long
Who swears that he can never get along
With the King of the cannibal islands.

He’s got in the East a tawney slut
And one in the West of a double smut
But with a wahine he never will put
Up in the Cannibal islands.

Hoky, poky, wanky, fong,
Chink is the thing will shove him along
And make this canting guy go strong
For the King of the Cannibal islands.

(Nuhou, 4/15/1873, p. 3)

Hoky Poky Wanky Fong.

Nuhou, Volume I, Number 15, Aoao 3. Aperila 15, 1873.

The famous Niihau protest mat on display at the Bishop Museum, 1874 / 2015.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

A Valuable Gift.—His Majesty received on Monday last a choice Niihau mat, presented to him by Mr. George Gay of Niihau. In this mat is wrought in red letters, a petition, praying that the taxes may be removed on all animals, and for other changes in the laws. The petition, which is in Hawaiian, is quite lengthy, and when copied off covered a page and a half of cap paper. It is the handiwork of an old woman named Kalai, who has been occupied 11 months in making it. She commenced it to give to the late Lunalilo, but on hearing of his death and the election of Kalakaua, sent it to the latter. His Majesty has requested her to work tow mats for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition—one to show the American coat-of-arms and the other the British coat-of-arms, designs of which will be sent to her to copy. Should she execute the order, these will be very attractive specimens of Hawaiian handiwork.

—Some years ago a native brought to us a Niihau mat three fathoms in length and less than one in width, in which was wrought in red letters the Lord’s prayer in Hawaiian. It was beautifully done, and must have cost him many months of labor. We engaged to take it at his price, but before he delivered it, he found a customer who offered him just double what he had valued it at. Such specimens are very rare, and of course valuable. If made by days’ work, it would be valued at hundreds of dollars.

[This mat was put on display at the Bishop Museum just yesterday. Go check it out if you are on Oahu nei.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 4/29/1874, p. 3)

A Valuable Gift.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume X, Number 17, Page 3. Aprila 29, 1874.

History of Kawaiahao Church, 1885.

KAWAIAHAO CHURCH

The readers of the Kuokoa will probably not be unable to recognize the features of the building pictured above; it is the church of Kawaiahao. It is an old building and one that is greatly beloved by a portion of our people, this mother church of ours. Its predecessor on these grounds was a church of pili grass; and the stone building was completed in 1842, constructed by the loving hands of the alii and makaainana of times gone by. It was Kekuanaoa and Bingham [Binamu] Sr. who selected the area where it was to be built and supervised its construction, however Bingham returned to America before the completion of this building.

There were many renowned events which were done in Kawaiahao such that it is as if the building was the place to carry out grand and fine deeds of the past, of the nation and the people. It was in this building that a number of the Legislative Sessions of the nation were opened, if this writer is not mistaken. It was in this building that Kamehameha V opened the Constitutional Convention [Ahaolelo Hooponopono Kumukanawai] on the 7th of July, 1864. Continue reading