A clear picture is worth a thousand words, 1909.

HONOLULU IN THE YEARS 1852–54.

The picture above shows a part of the town of Honolulu capturing the grounds of what is called now, the Executive Building [Iolani Palace], seen between the years from 1852 and 1854. Continue reading

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Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

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This must have been an awesome image, 1875.

SUPERB GIFT

FROM THE

Kuokoa Newspaper for 1876!

This coming year, 1876, the Kuokoa Newspaper, and Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation, will gift to its people who prepay their two dollars, a superb and proud gift, that being Pictures of the seven Monarchs of Hawaii nei, from Kamehameha I, the “Napoleon of the Pacific;” Liholiho I., Kamehameha II.; Kamehameha III.; Kamehameha IV., Liholiho II.; Kamehameha V.; Lunalilo I.; and Kalakaua I. Their Pictures will be all printed on thick paper so that it can be taken care of greatly. Continue reading

Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.

What was the Bishop Museum Director thinking, 1898.

OLD CANNONS.

When the warship Bennington returned from Kauai, it brought two old cannons from Hanalei, from the place of Judge Thurston [Lunakanawai Kakina], with the thought of the captain that these would be fine objects for the Bishop Museum to display.

He believed that these were cannons from the Russian fort facing Hanalei, but according to Judge Thurston’s statement, they were cannons form the warship of Lunalilo named Haaheo [Haaheo o Hawaii], and it ran aground at Hanalei many years ago.

The director of the Bishop Museum refused to take the guns, and so the captain thinks he will return the guns when he returns to Kauai.

[This was the ship of Liholiho, Kamehameha II, and not Lunalilo. There was much press about it last year! Go check out the exhibit at Kauai Museum on the Haaheo, showing now!! Does anyone know what became of these cannons?]

(Aloha Aina, 12/3/1898, p. 1)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 49, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 3, 1898.