Death of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1936.

THAT GREATLY BELOVED MATRIARCH DIES

MRS. EMMA NAWAHI LEAVES THIS LIFE
SHE WAS LIVING DEBILITATED FOR A LONG TIME AND PASSED AWAY

HILO, Hawaii, Dec. 28.—In the famous history of Hawaii nei, the name Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi will be seen and known, from when there was hair upon figure, when the town of Hilo was very young, and the trains joined the two sides of Hamakua and Puna; at 6:30 this morning she left behind this life, and Leleiwi crossed its hands behinds its back, and the earth was left the earth’s, and His to Him.

At 2 in the afternoon on this coming Sunday, her funeral will be held at her home. After the funeral her body will be cremated and her ashes buried at the cemetery at Homelani.

She left behind one son, Alexander Nawahi of Hilo and three grandchildren.

When Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi left this life, undone were the memories of the days when the alii of the land were living from this time of the new government. Mrs. Nawahi was a matriarch well known among the alii families of Hawaii nei, for her intelligence and for her becoming a leader for the lahui in those days when politics was strong, and her home in Hilo became the home of homes, the home that welcomed everyone and a place for travellers to rest.

She was part Chines, and her father was Tong Yee, and he was the very first Chinese to start growing sugarcane on the island of Hawaii, and her mother was Kahole-aua.

It was her father who first planted sugarcane on the land of Paukaa, and the first mill build on the island of Hawaii. Thereafter he entered into a partnership with John Ena Sr.

Mrs. Nawahi’s husband was the Hon. Joseph K. Nawahi, a member of the legislature of Hawaii nei for 20 years or more, and he was one of the political pillars who appointed Lunalilo as King for Hawaii nei. Mr. Nawahi was a powerful force opposing annexation, and in the year 1895 he established the Hawaiian Newspaper called “Ke Aloha Aina,” to express his political views.

Mrs. Nawahi was a member of the organizations Daughters of Hawaii, Kaahumanu Society, Hale o na Alii, Ahahui o na Wahine ma Hilo, a member of the Haili Church in Hilo, and so too of the American Red Cross.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 1/16/1936, p. 4)

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke VIII, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Ianuali 16, 1936.

On opening of Kamehameha School for Boys, and why newspapers were important, 1887.

A CORRECTION.

With the words “Ema Kaleleonalani” and “the Dowager Queen,” amongst the articles last week under the title “Kamehameha School [Kula Kamehameha];” what was correct for that part was Mrs. B. Pauahi Bishop. The words above were inserted by mistake because of the influence of reminiscences for Emma, and also because these high chiefs of the land sank down together, dying one after the other. Continue reading

Charles Burnette Wilson dies, conclusion, 1926.

CHARLES BURNETTE WILSON, ADVISOR TO LILIUOKALANI DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

(Continued from page 1)

Liliuokalani that she lost her throne due to the landing of troops from the U. S. S. Boston, the name of Marshal Wilson figured frequently. In the printed reports of Congress, containing the correspondence of Minister Stevens prior to the overthrow, his dispatches include the name of Wilson frequently in connection with the monarchy and especially refer to him as a very intimate friend of the queen. Continue reading

Letter from the Meiji Emperor to King Lunalilo, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Palapala hoalohaloha a na ‘Lii o Europa i ko kakou Moi.”]

Mutsuhito, by the Grace of Heaven, the Emperor of Japan, placed upon the Imperial Throne occupied by the Dynasty unchanged from the time immemorial, to His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands: Continue reading

Letter from Emperor Franz Joseph to King Lunalilo, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Palapala hoalohaloha a na ‘Lii o Europa i ko kakou Moi.”]

To His Majesty Lunalilo, King of Hawaii.

Great and Good Friend: From the valuable letter dated January 14th of the present year, I have the information of the demise of His Majesty Kamehameha V., and your elevation to the Royal Throne of Hawaii. Continue reading

Letter from King William to King Lunalilo, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Palapala hoalohaloha a na ‘Lii o Europa i ko kakou Moi.”]

Sire: I thank Your Majesty for having kindly communicated to me through your letter of the 14th of January, utl. the sad news of the unexpected demise of your beloved Cousin, His Majesty Kamehameha V., Continue reading

Letter from King Leopold to King Lunalilo, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Palapala hoalohaloha a na ‘Lii o Europa i ko kakou Moi.”]

To King Lunalilo,
King of the Hawaiian Islands.

Dear Brother: I have just received Your Majesty’s letter informing me of the demise of Your Cousin, King Kamehameha V., on the 11th of December last, and announcing also, that in accordance with the Constitution of the Kingdom, the Legislative Assembly having elected You King of the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading