Day after La Kuokoa, 1879.

Yesterday, the 28th of November, was a national holiday of Hawaii nei, and it was the Thirty-Sixth year as a nation because of the agreement of the great nations of Great Britain and France. It is a day that is cherished by every Hawaiian heart. Continue reading

The time will come, 1893.

Tomorrow, November 28, is the Independence Day of Hawaii nei, and it will be the fiftieth year of our living as an Independent Nation, and being recognized by the enlightened nations of the world. This is the jubilee year; however, the plunderers believe that they hold the steering paddle and that we will not have a joyful jubilee on that day. What of that; let us be patient, for there will come a day that the lahui will be joyful and be pleased to no end. Hold your breaths! It will come!

(Lei Momi, 11/27/1893, p. 4)

LeiMomi_11_27_1893_4.png

Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 17, Aoao 4. Novemaba 27, 1893.

La Kuokoa celebrated at Kawaiahao Church, 1892.

AN OPEN INVITATION.

To all citizens who have aloha for their Alii and patriots of Queen Liliuokalani, in the district of Honolulu;

Aloha to you all: Those whose names appear below are members of the Committee to invite all citizens for the YMCA [Ahahui Opiopio Imipono Karistiano] of Kawaiahao and Kaumakapili. Continue reading

Another mele for La Kuokoa, 1871.

No ka La Kuokoa.

Leo.—A Victory, Happy Hours. p 144.

1. Ke kani nei na pahu e,
Ma keia la maikai;
E ala mai a oli ae,
La Kuokoa nei.
Ke kani nei na mele e
Mauka, a makai;
Maanei, ma o, a ma na puu,
Nani ke kani mai.

Cho—Hooho pu na kini nei,
Huza, huza, e oli e,
Huza, huza, huza, e oli e,
Huza, huza, huza, e oli e. Continue reading

A song for Hawaiian Independence Day, 1870.

La Kuokoa o Hawaii.

1. E ku kakou a olioli pu,
No ka la Kuokoa o Hawaii nei,
Ua hiki no ia kakou,
Ke haanui a haakena,
I ka pomaikai o ka lahui,
No ka la Kuokoa o ke aupuni.

He la kupanaha no  keia,
I ike ole ia mamua,
Ia Kauikeaouli me Liholiho,
Me na la mua o Kamehameha.

2. Ke ku mai nei Hawaii,
Ua hauoli na kuahiwi,
Ua haanou o Maunakea,
Ua hipahipa o Maunaloa,
Hu-lo-hu-lo o Hualalai,
No ka la Kuokoa o ke aupuni.

He la kupanaha no keia, &c., Continue reading

New Hawaiian shop, “Ka Noeau o Hawaii,” 1896.

“Ka Noeau o Hawaii.”

This is the name of a store that opened on this Independence Day [La Kuokoa] by some Hawaiian women in an office of Charles Aki’s [Kale Aki] large new rental space just built at Leleo near Koiuiu. There is sold Hawaiian goods fashioned with skill by the hands of women like ie hats, fans, blankets, purses, lace, and many other things, and also they do tailoring. This shop is under the equal management of Mrs. Aana Kekoa and her sister L. Aoe Like and Meleana Li. We doubt it, but it is said that they did sacrifices with the snout of a pig, and they feasted with those that labored with them until satiated. Our prayer for them is that they meet with good fortune and progress.

(Makaainana, 12/7/1896, p. 2)

"Ka Noeau o Hawaii."

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI—-Ano Hou, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 7, 1896.

23 years of independence, La Kuokoa, 1866.

Independence Day of Hawaii nei.—This past Wednesday, the 28th of November, was the day that the Nation of Hawaii gained its independence from the other power of the nations of Britain and France. On that day in the year 1843, the great powers of Britain and France joined together to discuss the bestowing of independence on this Nation, and the two of them agreed to this and we gained this independence. The great island of Australia under the power of Great Britain, but as for us, we are overjoyed, and can boast that we are amongst the few Independent Nations under the sun. There are many islands like us, who live peacefully under the powers over them, but Hawaii lives clearly without any power placed above its head. Therefore the commemoration by the Hawaiian hearts from the East to the West of these islands on this day, is not a small thing, but it is important, and we know by heart the foundational words of our Nation. “E mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono.” The gaining of this Independence, was not by the point of a sword or the mouth of a gun, but was gotten peacefully, and upon He who sits on the great Throne is our efforts and great trust, and so let us not be mistaken that the drinking of intoxicating drinks is what preserves our Independence, that is not the case. The past Wednesday was the 23rd year of our commemoration. 21 shots were fired from the hill of Puowina [aka Puowaina], and the day went on peacefully from morning until night.

(Kuokoa, 12/1/1866, p. 3)

Ka La Kuokoa o Hawaii nei.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 48, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 1, 1866.

Independence Day, 1893.

La Kuokoa Song.

E Hawaii e, E Hawaii e
E Hui hauoli pu kakou
Ma keia La nui kamahao
La Kuokoa nou e ka Lahui.

Hui:

La Kuokoa nou e Hawaii
La hauoli no ka Lahui
E ka I, e ka Mahi, me ka Palena
Hui hauoli nui ae kakou.

E Hawaii e, E Hawaii e
Nou keia la me ka ilihia
Na kualono ou e hooho mai
Na kula uli e hauoli pu.

E Hawaii e, E Hawaii e
E Mau ke Ea o ka Aina i ka Pono
Na na Mana Lani e kakoo mai
I kou Kuokoa a mau loa.

Haku ia e

S. K. Kaunamano.

Makapala, Hamakua, Dekemaba 18, 1893.

[Independence Day Song

O Hawaii, O Hawaii
Let us unite in happiness
On this great wonderful day
Independence Day for you, O Lahui.

Chorus:

Your Independence Day, O Hawaii
Joyous day for the Lahui
O I, O Mahi, and Palena
Let us unite in happiness.

O Hawaii, O Hawaii
This is your day, with reverence
May your mountain ridges cheer
May your verdant fields share in the gaiety.

O Hawaii, O Hawaii
May the Sovereignty of the Land be Forever in Righteousness
May the Heavenly Powers lend support
To your Independence for all times.

Composed by S. K. Kaunamano

Makapala, Hamakua, December 18, 1893.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 12/23/1893, p. 1)

La Kuokoa Song.

Hawaii Holomua, Buke I, Helu 14, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 23, 1893.