Iolani Hale, 2017.

Iolani Hale on the eve of the birthday of Kahikuonalani.

 

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Iolani Hale, Novemaba 15, 2017

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Kalakaua, the firemen’s king! 1875.

Burning of the Ship Emerald.—At half-past two o’clock on Monday morning an alarm of fire was sounded by the watchmen in the bell-tower, which proved to be for the ship Emerald, at anchor in the roadstead. Fire brigades, about two hundred officers and men, were immediately dispatched from the Pensacola in port, which took off two or three of the patent fire extinguishers. The city firemen also turned out promptly, with their machines, hose carts and ladders, ready to assist whenever ordered. At early dawn, the ship was towed into the harbor alongside the steamboat wharf, where the firemen and engines could get access to her. The fire was first discovered soon after midnight, but when the naval force reached the ship the hole was so full of smoke that the fire extinguishers could could not be successfully applied, and little could be done towards checking the fire until the engines could be brought to bear on it. From six oʻclock, the firemen, mariners and citizens worked faithfully till after noon, when the fire was apparently subdued, and the firemen returned home. Continue reading

Patriotism, 1893.

THE PEOPLE OF HAWAII HAVE ALOHA FOR THEIR ALII.

From ancient times, from all the way into the realm of po, from early on, from the very beginning, born was the aloha of Hawaiian Men, Hawaiian Women, and the Offspring of their loins, for their Alii, all the way until this very day; it would seem that it is greater than anything else pertaining to their sovereign, and it would seem there is no greater proof than the words pronounced by our King Kauliluaikeanuwaialeale [Kalakaua], when he went on that famous trip around the world in the year 1881, and upon his treading once more upon his birth sands; this is what he stated:

KE KAENA A KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ua kaahele au maluna o ka ilihonua me ka moana,
A Inia mamao, a me Kina kaulana,
Hoea i na aekai o Aferika, a na palena o Europa,
A halawai me ka ikaika o na aina a pau,
A ia’u i ku ai ma ka aoao o na Poo Aupuni,
Ka poe mana maluna o ka lakou ma ka hiehie Alii,
Hoomaopopo iho la i ka uku-iki, a nawaliwali o Ko’u,
Me Ko’u Nohoalii i hookahuaia maluna o kahi puu Pele,
A ma kahi o na miliona i hooko i ka keia mau Moi,
He mau tausani wale iho no malalo o Ko’u malu,
Aka, ka upu nei loko, Na’u ke Kaena hiki,
Aia he mau nani maloko o na poai o Ko’u mau aekai—
I oi aku ka makamae i ka O’u mau hoa Moi,
Aohe O’u kumu hopo maloko o Ko’u Aupuni,
He hiki ke hui me Ko’u lahui me ka weli ole,
Aohe maka’u No’u iho, me ke kiai pili-paa ole ia,
A Na’u ke Kaena, he momi i hoounaia mailuna mai Na’u—
Eia ia’u ke aloha oiaio o Ko’u Lahui.

[The first time I heard these powerful words was from a Palani Vaughan record (and looking back, I think he is one of the many reasons why this blog exists today). I heard it and thought man, that is definitely not a boast that could seriously be claimed by any other of his fellow leaders of his time (so much less by those of today). And when I first saw Kalakaua’s words restated in this article after the overthrow, it made the statement even more profound. This, by the way, was so important that they reprinted it again on 1/21/1893!

For the English version from an article right after Kalakaua’s return, click here! Learn the stories!! Pass them forward!!!]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 3. Ianuari 18, 1893.

A mele for Princess Kaiulani composed by Mrs. Kala, 1893.

HE LEI NO KAIULANI.

He lei keia no Kaiulani
Papahi Kalaunu a o Hawaii
Ola o ka Laninuiahilapalapa
O ka wohi ku kahi a ka Lahui
Ua hui lokahi a o Europa
Kaohi i ka Ea a o Hawaii
Walohia e ka leo o Kaiulani
Ua hewa anei au e Amerika
Hoole ia ai Ko’u kuleana
I ka noho Kalaunu a o Hawaii
Aia i ka nua Hale Keokeo
Ka Hale alii i Wakinekona
E noi ana hoi me ka hopo ole
I ka ea aloha o Hawaii nei Continue reading

Hawaiian naval flag? 1887.

THE HAWAIIAN NAVY FLAG.

The Hawaiian Navy flag, from a design by Mrs. Strong, contains in the center, on a white back ground, a gold crown resting on a yellow shield. The shield contains a white tabu stick [puloulou], crossed by two red kahilis, Continue reading

News out of Lahaina, 1867.

From Lahaina.

Pertaining to the Queen.—Queen Emma has returned from her tour of Wailuku on this past Tuesday evening of May, and it was at 8 o’clock that she reached here in Lahaina. She was accompanied by the distinguished ones of the valley shade [ka malu hekuawa], and she returned with her attendants who went along, His Ex. P. Nahaolelua, Col. D. Kalakaua, Hon. P. Y. Kekuaokalani, Hon. A. M. Kahalewai and Mrs. Kalakaua.

Exhibit of paintings.—This past Thursday night, there was a great exhibit of illustrations at the School of the English Mission; there were many portraits shown that night, all of Hawaii’s Alii; and we admired all of the paintings, and they were done with skill; in attendance as well was the Queen.

A Party.—On the evening of Thursday, Reverend G. Mason held a party to honor the Queen, and those who were instructed, and everything carried out at the party was gracious, and the tables were laden with things of all sorts, and we ate until satiated, and a most was leftover. Continue reading

Liliu’s National Anthem reaches New York, after a fashion, 1875.

Their National Hymn.

The words and music of the Hawaiian national anthem are both the composition of Mrs. Lila K. Dominis, the sister of King Kalakaua. The first part of the hymn we transcribe for the edification of our readers:

HE MELE LAHIU HAWAII.

Ka Makua Mana Loa,
Malin wai ia wakou,
E haliu aku rei.
We wa hian haahan,
E wan ka waluhia
O rei Pae Alna,
Wal Hawaiia Nuhan,
Mololo o Kou Malu. Continue reading