Abduction!? 1877.

Boys were kidnapped.

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:–

I send off my bundle to you, having the right time to do so. For I see that you are one of the shooting stars of the nation of Hawaii, flying from where the sun rises to where the sun sets, shooting all the way here to North America.

The words placed above is what grows in my conscience. Might you be patient and accept the contents of my bundle. For I have seen you and how you have patience to accept what is sent to you. Its contents are here below:–

Five Hawaiian boys were abducted by the lumber transporting ships Atlanta and Victor. Three boys on the Atlanta; these are their names, Nakai, Kikau, and Kanahele. And aboard the Victor, two boys; these are their names, Keliikipi and Kaaoaouila. That is my baggage that I entrust to you, and it is for you to call out loudly to the parents of these boys, as they may be left feeling aloha for their children abducted by the Captains of these ships who break the law of the Nation of Hawaii and King Kalakaua. When these boys arrived here at Port Gamble, the Captains abandoned them. We believe that if there were no Hawaiians here, the boys’ health would have been danger, and they would have had no place to rest their heads.

The place they were hid was in a skiff that had its opening turned over atop the Forward House* of the sailors in the bow. That is where they hid when the ship carrying lumber left Honolulu, that is what they told us. These children are very little, perhaps ten or so years old; not fit to work at the lumber mills here in Puget Sound.

To the Parents–O Parents, watch your children closely, and do not let them wander about the docks, or go aboard the ships, and enjoy feasting on barrel meats, lest they be abducted by the ship Captains like these children. You have heard that Kalakaua’s is a “Lahui increasing nation” and there is a Hawaiian government law that forbids Hawaiians from going abroad unless their contract is approved by the governor of the island on which they live; only with the governor’s approval can they leave; also the Governor must command the ship Captain to care for and return the man or men that he takes away. And if the Captain or Captains do not return the man or men that they take away, then they will be fined $300 for each man. That is the law for the Captains who secretly take away Hawaiians.

To the Governors.–O Governors, do your job conscientiously, and so too your subordinates, be vigilant of your duties, search the trading ships of all types which leave Honolulu, for there are many Hawaiians who leave Honolulu and live abroad for long periods without it being known that they left, and they have been living here in these foreign lands for many years.

But here is my question pertaining to that. Who is at fault? The ship Captain perhaps? The children perhaps? In my opinion, it is the ship captain’s fault, if I am not mistaken. That is according to what the children told us when we questioned them, and they said that they were brought because of the desire of the captain that they come here. If that is true, it would be best if the captains return the boys to Honolulu when the ships go once again, or it would be better if they were tried so that it is made clear if the captains are at fault or if it is the children. As for the names of these ships, I do not know them [Atlanta and Victor??], but the agents of this company and some haole of Honolulu should know, should it be thought to ask about the two.

I have nothing more to talk about at this time, but I ask for your kindness, if I am wrong about this, excuse me, and if I am correct before you and them as well, then place it in your bureau of love, and it will be for you to spread it before the public so that our many friends will know, they who live from Kumukahi where the sun rises to Lehua where the sun sets.

To you goes my warm aloha, and to the type-setting boys of the Press goes my expression of aloha, and to your Editor goes my loving right-handed handshake.

G. W. E. Kawaiulaomaleka,
Puget Sound, Kitsap County, Sep. 28, 1877.

*Lana House. Not sure where this phrase comes from. I could not find it used in any other article. It was suggested by http://www.maritimehawaii.com that this likely refers to the Forward House.

(Kuokoa, 11/10/1877, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 45, Aoao 3. Novemaba 10, 1877.

Henry Grube Marchant, 1893.

Henry Grube is heading back to the land of his birth. He was sent to increase his knowledge in engraving. And it seems that next month, October, is when it is believed that he will return home.

[Henry Grube Marchant was one of the youths sent abroad to Boston to learn engraving as part of King Kalakaua’s Education of Hawaiian Youths in Foreign Countries.]

(Lei Momi, 8/28/1893, p. 3)

Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Augate 28, 1893.

Where is this portrait? 1881—2022

Found in a Japanese newspaper: “Mr. Shoji Masayoshi of Tokyo, a famous oil painter, is painting a portrait of the Alii, the King of Hawaii, looking just like the King when he wore Japanese royal attire at a banquet given in his honor at Momijikwan,* one of the palaces. It is said that this artist will gift this painting of their beloved King to the Nation of Hawaii.

[Does anyone know who this artist is and what happened to the painting?]

*Kōyōkan

(Elele Poakolu, 8/10/1881, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 23, Aoao 5.

King Kalakaua’s Study Abroad Program, 1936.

[Found under: “E MAU ANA ANEI KA OLELO HAWAII”]

King Kalakaua Gave His Support to Educate His Lahui

While King Kalakaua was upon the throne, as a result of him speaking with his Cabinet, and also approved by the Legislature of 1882 or 1883, there were many Hawaiians who were sent to far away lands in seek of education. It feels like it happened between the years 1883 and 1884. Some of these boys went at the government’s expense, and some under the expense of the Father Missionaries.

1. Robert W. Wilcox and Robert N. Boyd, were sent to military school in Italy.

2. Matthew Makalua and Piianaia, were sent to Oxford in England, to medical school. Piianaia did not graduate, but Makaula did graduate and became a very great doctor in England. He married a woman and he had a number of children. He is dead now. He did not return to Hawaii.

Continue reading

More on estate sale of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1936.

Valued Relics Of Hawaiian Royalty Offered At Auction

Days of old Hawaii were brought to life yesterday morning when historical pieces of rare Hawaiian furniture, clothing, jewelry and ornaments belonging to the late Joseph K. Nawahi and the late Mrs. Emma A. Nawahi of Hilo were displayed and sold at auction at 1633 Nuuanu street. Valuable koa furniture, ancient leis made of feathers of extinct Island birds, tapas belonging to royalty and exquisite inlaid koa calabashes and cabinet articles were among the numerous varieties under the hammer. Continue reading

A mele composed by William A. Kiha for La Kuokoa, 1876.

HE HIMENI NO KA LA KUOKOA.

[This is a song that will be sung by the school children at the church of Kaumakapili on that day that our Independence was recognized.]

La hauoli keia no kakou a pau,
La Kuokoa—e
Kou Hae nani e Hawaii Ponoi,
E mau aku kou welo ana i na kau a pau loa.

Cho.—Hae nani, Hae nani o Hawaii nei,
E mau aku kou welo ana.
Ma na la nui, la Kuokoa,
Huro no ka Hae Hawaii. Continue reading

Death of Colonel Sam Parker, 1920.

SAMUEL PARKER DEPARTS FROM THIS LIFE

Death is Victorious Over Him, Following a Long Sickness

HIS BODY RETURNED TO WAILUA IN MANA, HAWAII

Escorted by his Grandchild David Kalakaua Kawananakoa and His Family

After suffering from a stroke some years ago, Colonel Samuel Parker grew weary of this life, on the night of last Friday, at his home outside of Waikiki, and his body was returned aboard the Mauna Kea of this past Wednesday to be laid to rest in his family cemetery at Mana, Waimea, Hawaii.

When he passed on, he was 66 years old, 10 months and 12 days. Continue reading

Birth of the new Alii, 1875.

The Hon. A. S. Cleghorn was blessed with being gifted with a beautiful daughter by his wife, the Alii Likelike Cleghorn. This is a new Royal Offspring in the era of King Kalakaua. Our humble plea is for the Heavens to watch over and bless Hawaii,

(Lahui Hawaii, 10/21/1875, p. 3)

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 21, 1875.

The bells of the city rang a merry peal, 1875.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23.

ON SATURDAY morning last, the 16th instant, Her Royal Highness the Princess Miriam Likelike, sister to His Majesty the King, and wife of the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, was safely delivered of a daughter. At four P. M. all the bells of the city rang a merry peal in honor of the infant Princess.

(PCA, 10/23/1875, p. 2)

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XX, Number 17, Page 2. October 23, 1875.