Lei Day 50 years ago, 1968.

It all started in 1928

Wear your aloha shirts, muumuus, leis tomorrow

As has been the custom since Grace Tower Warren and Don Blanding began the observance of Lei Day in 1928, aloha shirts, muumuus and leis will be the garb of the day tomorrow.

Throughout the Islands each year on May Day, schools and other institutions present their May programs and lei contests.

The Oahu Lei Contest, sponsored by the Department of Parks and Recreation, will be judged tomorrow and the leis will be on display at the Waikiki Shell from 1 to 9 p.m.

Prizes totaling $650 will be awarded to  lei makers in different categories.

Darlene Bakke, this year’s lei queen, will reign over the festivities including music, hula dancing and pageantry, to be held at the Shell.

A demonstration of kahili making—kahilis were the standard of royalty in Old Hawaii—will be given from 9 to 11 a.m. on the Shell lawn. Continue reading

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At Waimanalo, Mololani, and Mokumanu are your mats of feathers, 1886.

HE INOA NU’A HULU NO KA MOIWAHINE KAPIOLANI.

(Hakuia e Mrs. A. L. K.)

A i Waimanalo ko Nua Hulu,
I hakuia mai e Mololani,
Noho o Kalani hano i ka nani,
I ka lawe hoolai a ka mokuahi,
Hoohihi ka manao e ike aku,
E kilohi i ka nani o ka Mokumanu,
O ka pohai a ka manu i ka lewa,
Kikahakaha lua i ka ilikai,
Welo haaheo ko Hae Kalaunu,
Ua ike mai o Malei ke kupua,
Oia kai kapu la ua noa,
Ua hehiku aku nei o Kalani,
Nau i olali hoohie aku,
Oia mau ale hanupanupa,
Ka iniki welawela a ke ehukai,
Lamalama ua i ka nani alii,
Liilii na hana a ke Telefone,
Haihai olelo me ka huapala,
Kulia ka anuu la e o mai,
Ka wahine nona ka Lei Hooheno. Continue reading

New kahili made by Keahi Luahine, 1920.

CEREMONY MARKS TRANSFER OF FINE PAGEANT KAHILIS

Fourteen magnificent kahilis, completed after three months of painstaking toil by a Hawaiian, Keahi Luahine, of Kakaako, especially for the great Missionary Centennial Pageant of Tuesday next, were last evening, at 7 o’clock, ceremoniously conveyed from Kakaako to Bishop Hall, Punahou.

The ceremonies attending the transfer were such as would have been held in honor of such royal symbols in the past. They are replicas of kahilis now in the Bishop museum. Continue reading

Might these be the feathers the Hawaiians were wearing in Salt Lake City? 1898.

CORSETS, HATS AND JEWELRY.

Some Late Fashion Hints—Philadelphia Physician Shows Women How to Lace.

A NEW PARIS COAT.

IBIS FEATHERS.

The promises of May are already being made, and tender hearts who will not have the plumage or bodies of dead songsters in their hats can this spring trim the hats with lovely ibis feathers that cost no avian lives, and are fair to look upon. Of course the purple ibis feathers from Egypt are to be classed among the costly beauties of millinery, but we have our own American scarlet ibis to borrow tail feathers from and fix in our new wide-brimmed hats.

This delicate plumage is, however, dyed many handsome colors, and, beside this and ostrich feathers, to be safely adopted by any Audubonite, we are going to have lovely hats later on trimmed so gracefully and economically with nothing but masses of shot taffeta silk cut on the bias and every edge closely pinked. This piece silk will assume, in fact, has already largely taken the place of ribbon bows for the trimming of simpler hats. Nothing can be more alluringly daring than a sapphire blue felt, with just a yard of cerise taffeta twisted about the crown, perky bows and ends starting up in every direction. Here and there the taffeta was caught down with cheap pins set with mock sapphires and rhinestones.

Nobody yet dares to assume which ways hats are going to tilt for spring wearing, but just in this midseason a tendency is making toward piling everything in front. Thake a look, for instance, at the crowning glory on the head of the model in the braided coat. It is typical of the daring frontage now used. Here the hat brim is of modes proportions; it is the mounting black and white ostrich tips that lend the stately effect. Another hat worth mentioning boasted a brim four and one-half inches wide, and this was turned directly off the face, bent into three perpendicular flutes, and over the edge of the brim, finished by puffings of black chiffon, nodded the heavy heads of half a dozen prize tall feathers.

(Salt Lake Hearld, 1/16/1898, p. 15)

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(The Salt Lake Herald, Number 49, Page 15. January 16, 1898.

John Wise on Hawaiian Homes and more, 1921.

The Question about the Work Ethic of Hawaiians.

Your writer [John Wise], continues to defend the Hawaiian lahui from being attacked by that question above.

The Hawaiians have perhaps become much talked about amongst those who do not know them and who are not familiar with their accomplishments of today and of the past. And maybe mostly these days for the land being given to us. Your writer frequently clashes with all kinds of other people who protest the giving of land to Hawaiians, because of the ridiculous idea that they don’t know how to work or that they are lazy.

In these attacks, we can see, O Lahui, that they are carried with criticisms and that it is would be a waste to confirm their misbeliefs. But so that the Hawaiians may answer these questions, your writer wants to be made known for all times the sound justification for our side. The readers of past issues of the Kuokoa have seen the responses given by the Commissioner in Washington, and they have seen also the other justifications given, in the newspaper.

The ultimate representation of the skill of a people is their supplying themselves with food and the things necessary for their livelihood. There perhaps is no better response than that. This lahui was living by  themselves for centuries, supplying themselves with everything, and received no assistance from the outside.

But there are things made by this lahui, things that attest to their fine craftsmanship, that will serve as a measure of their skills. Those that see Hawaiian canoes and their manufacture and how they can get Hawaiians through great gales, remaining solid in the dangers of the pounding of waves; how they could make beautiful canoes by using stone adzes; the distance they were taken from mountain to the sea; the patience of the canoe makers. All of these things will show, without being contradicted, that just by seeing the quality of the canoes can one see that this is a lahui that knows how to work. We see the canoes of today being made by people from other lands, and the canoes made by Hawaiians are far more well made and beautiful.

The beauty of things crafted by a people are undeniable proof of the work ethic of that people. Where will you find things more beautiful, O Hawaiians, if you travel all over the world, than the ahuula that are preserved at the Museum of Kamehameha School. Where is the lahui that lives on today, or perhaps has disappeared, that can make these outstanding works, with a beauty second to none, with fine craftsmanship, and patience; with a true sense of work ethic. Snaring birds is a great task all in itself, the inserting [kuku ana] of the feathers is a big job. One mamo feather cloak was said to have been started during the time of Umi and completed during the time of Kamehameha. For this ahu, the entire ahu were done with mamo feathers. And by our counting back, we see that ten generations of ancient kings passed on before the completion of this ahu; showing that it took from about 250 to 300 years of work. Where is there a great work that was completed by a people taking hundreds of years to construct? We perhaps can think of huge things, but as for something of this nature which required the knowledge and patience of men, there is no equal. Continue reading

More on Kalaniopuu’s ahuula and mahiole, 1887.

Captain Cook Relics.

Speaking of the Captain Cook relics which have been secured for the New South Wales Government, our London correspondent says, writing on September 9:—”Sir Saul Samuel has secured for the New South Wales Government the whole of the interesting collection of Captain Cook’s relics which were on view at the late Colonial and Indian Exhibition. Some of them he has had to purchase, others have been presented as gift. Your…

(Sydney Mail, 10/22/1887, p. 868)

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The Sydney Mail, Volume XLIV, Number 1424, Page 868. October 22, 1887.

Continue reading