I hope they got their mamo feather lei back, 1862.

Announcement.

LET ALL PEOPLE KNOW, I call out to you all, but it is the specific person that is the one, for I found and have here in my hands a

Mamo Feather Lei,

Continue reading

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Traditional mele and oli demonstrated, 1936.

ANCIENT ISLE MUSIC PLAYED

By MARY SALISBURY
(Special Star-Bulletin Correspondence)

LIHUE, Kauai, July 30.—A delightful hour of ancient Hawaiian chanting and use of the oldest musical instruments of the islands was presented by Fred Malulani Beckley Kahea and Timothy Makalei Montgomery on Monday evening at the parish house.

Both Mr. Kahea and Mr.Montgomery are from Honolulu and the program was sponsored by the Kauai Historical society and the Kauai Chamber of Commerce. Continue reading

Lei Day 50 years ago, 1968.

It all started in 1928

Wear your aloha shirts, muumuus, leis tomorrow

As has been the custom since Grace Tower Warren and Don Blanding began the observance of Lei Day in 1928, aloha shirts, muumuus and leis will be the garb of the day tomorrow.

Throughout the Islands each year on May Day, schools and other institutions present their May programs and lei contests.

The Oahu Lei Contest, sponsored by the Department of Parks and Recreation, will be judged tomorrow and the leis will be on display at the Waikiki Shell from 1 to 9 p.m.

Prizes totaling $650 will be awarded to  lei makers in different categories.

Darlene Bakke, this year’s lei queen, will reign over the festivities including music, hula dancing and pageantry, to be held at the Shell.

A demonstration of kahili making—kahilis were the standard of royalty in Old Hawaii—will be given from 9 to 11 a.m. on the Shell lawn. Continue reading

At Waimanalo, Mololani, and Mokumanu are your mats of feathers, 1886.

HE INOA NU’A HULU NO KA MOIWAHINE KAPIOLANI.

(Hakuia e Mrs. A. L. K.)

A i Waimanalo ko Nua Hulu,
I hakuia mai e Mololani,
Noho o Kalani hano i ka nani,
I ka lawe hoolai a ka mokuahi,
Hoohihi ka manao e ike aku,
E kilohi i ka nani o ka Mokumanu,
O ka pohai a ka manu i ka lewa,
Kikahakaha lua i ka ilikai,
Welo haaheo ko Hae Kalaunu,
Ua ike mai o Malei ke kupua,
Oia kai kapu la ua noa,
Ua hehiku aku nei o Kalani,
Nau i olali hoohie aku,
Oia mau ale hanupanupa,
Ka iniki welawela a ke ehukai,
Lamalama ua i ka nani alii,
Liilii na hana a ke Telefone,
Haihai olelo me ka huapala,
Kulia ka anuu la e o mai,
Ka wahine nona ka Lei Hooheno. Continue reading

New kahili made by Keahi Luahine, 1920.

CEREMONY MARKS TRANSFER OF FINE PAGEANT KAHILIS

Fourteen magnificent kahilis, completed after three months of painstaking toil by a Hawaiian, Keahi Luahine, of Kakaako, especially for the great Missionary Centennial Pageant of Tuesday next, were last evening, at 7 o’clock, ceremoniously conveyed from Kakaako to Bishop Hall, Punahou.

The ceremonies attending the transfer were such as would have been held in honor of such royal symbols in the past. They are replicas of kahilis now in the Bishop museum. Continue reading

Might these be the feathers the Hawaiians were wearing in Salt Lake City? 1898.

CORSETS, HATS AND JEWELRY.

Some Late Fashion Hints—Philadelphia Physician Shows Women How to Lace.

A NEW PARIS COAT.

IBIS FEATHERS.

The promises of May are already being made, and tender hearts who will not have the plumage or bodies of dead songsters in their hats can this spring trim the hats with lovely ibis feathers that cost no avian lives, and are fair to look upon. Of course the purple ibis feathers from Egypt are to be classed among the costly beauties of millinery, but we have our own American scarlet ibis to borrow tail feathers from and fix in our new wide-brimmed hats.

This delicate plumage is, however, dyed many handsome colors, and, beside this and ostrich feathers, to be safely adopted by any Audubonite, we are going to have lovely hats later on trimmed so gracefully and economically with nothing but masses of shot taffeta silk cut on the bias and every edge closely pinked. This piece silk will assume, in fact, has already largely taken the place of ribbon bows for the trimming of simpler hats. Nothing can be more alluringly daring than a sapphire blue felt, with just a yard of cerise taffeta twisted about the crown, perky bows and ends starting up in every direction. Here and there the taffeta was caught down with cheap pins set with mock sapphires and rhinestones.

Nobody yet dares to assume which ways hats are going to tilt for spring wearing, but just in this midseason a tendency is making toward piling everything in front. Thake a look, for instance, at the crowning glory on the head of the model in the braided coat. It is typical of the daring frontage now used. Here the hat brim is of modes proportions; it is the mounting black and white ostrich tips that lend the stately effect. Another hat worth mentioning boasted a brim four and one-half inches wide, and this was turned directly off the face, bent into three perpendicular flutes, and over the edge of the brim, finished by puffings of black chiffon, nodded the heavy heads of half a dozen prize tall feathers.

(Salt Lake Hearld, 1/16/1898, p. 15)

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(The Salt Lake Herald, Number 49, Page 15. January 16, 1898.