More on Aunty Elizabeth from Bishop Museum’s post today, 1959.

‘Aunty Elizabeth,’ Kalakaua Ave. Lei-Seller, Dies

Another familiar face in the fast-changing Waikiki scenery passed from view Saturday with the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hoopii Delovio—”Aunty Elizabeth” to thousands.

The 54-year-old woman and two others were the first to set up a lei stand in Waikiki some 35 years ago. Continue reading

More on estate sale of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1936.

Valued Relics Of Hawaiian Royalty Offered At Auction

Days of old Hawaii were brought to life yesterday morning when historical pieces of rare Hawaiian furniture, clothing, jewelry and ornaments belonging to the late Joseph K. Nawahi and the late Mrs. Emma A. Nawahi of Hilo were displayed and sold at auction at 1633 Nuuanu street. Valuable koa furniture, ancient leis made of feathers of extinct Island birds, tapas belonging to royalty and exquisite inlaid koa calabashes and cabinet articles were among the numerous varieties under the hammer. Continue reading

Sailing without need of a compass, 1928.

THE YOUTH OF PUNA

Mr. Jonah Kumalae,
Editor of the Alakai o Hawaii,

Aloha nui oe:

Please allow me some open room in your precious.

Miss Laenihi, the youth of Puna lives on Hawaii. Her favorite activity which she always does is sailing on the ocean on her canoe to fish, and surfing after returning from fishing. Continue reading

Mrs. Blount in Hilo, 1893.

LEHUA LEI OF HILO.

At 7 a. m., on Thursday, May 11, 1893. The secretary, Mrs. M. Kaiuaola, of the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo Town, met with the Honorable Lady, Mrs. J. H. Blount, at the introduction of that Malihini Woman with the Kamaaina Women, and there were lei of lehua from Mokaulele along with bouquets of Magnolia conferred upon the Honorable Lady, Mrs. J. H. Blount. The daughters of the Kanilehua Rain treated her royally. Continue reading

Description of Hawaii Island, 1867.

TRAVELLING ON HAWAII.

Makawao, September 10, 1867.

O Alaula—Aloha to you:—I want to tell you of some things pertaining to my travels on Hawaii. On the 6th of August, we boarded the Kilauea to sail to Hawaii. It was a fine day; we sailed that day and night.

We stopped in Kealakekua.

At nine o’clock that next day we landed at the cape of Kaawaloa. We had many  thoughts when we saw that place famous in the old days. We entered the house of a chiefess, Mrs. L. K. Pratt, my schoolmate in days past. We shared aloha; we at oranges [alani] and melon [ipu], and smelled the wind of Kaawaloa, and we all boarded the steamship. Continue reading