Mrs. J. P. Kahanamoku passes on, 1936.

MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU SETS THIS LIFE ASIDE

SHE WAS A MOTHER GREATLY BELOVED BY ALL

Mrs. Julia Paoa Kahanamoku left this life at 69 years old, and she is the mother of Sheriff Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. At 9 o’clock or so in the morning of this past Thursday, June 4, she left this life behind, at her residence at 1847 Ala Moana Road, after going into a decline through weakness for a long time. Her husband preceded her in death many years ago, Captain Duke H. Kahanamoku.

She was born here on Oahu, and she spent most of her life in Waikiki. She descended from the lines of the I and Mahi of Hawaii, …

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 1)

WAIHO MAI O MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1936.

…from ancient times, and her birth father, Mr. Hoolae Paoa, was one of the people who oversaw many ahupuaa during the monarchy. She was a full Hawaiian by birth, as well as was her husband.

During her healthy days, she participated in many promotional activities in this land. During the years of the great world war [WWI], she put herself out doing all the work of the Red Cross [Ahahui Ke’a Ulaula] in Honolulu;* she was a member of the Kapiolani Maternity Association, Daugthers of Hawaii, and a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu].

Mrs. Kahanamoku had six sons, boys who each went off to find his own fortune, boys who participated greatly in promotional activities as well as body-strengthening events in this land. She has two girls who are living, and one who passed some year ago; the ones living are Bernice and Kapiolani, and the third who died was Maria.

Her ashes were buried at the cemetery in Nuuanu.

This Newspaper joins in on the grieving with this family of children who are bereft of their parents, as well as the rest of the family; and we humbly beseech that the sad thoughts of this family of children and all of the ohana as well be lightened.

*It is no surprise that Duke himself was knitting warm clothes for the Red Cross!

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 4)

...au kahiko, a o kona luaui makuakane...

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1836.

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Duke H. Kahanamoku, father of the world-famous Duke P. Kahanamoku, passes on, 1917.

DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU LEAVES THIS LIFE BEHIND.

Thursday last week, Duke K. Kahanamoku [Duke H. Kahanamoku] grew weary of this worldly life, the father of the swimming champion of Hawaii nei, at his home at 1847 Ala Moana Road, Waikiki.

On that day mentioned, Kahanamoku went swimming at the ocean that afternoon for his health, and upon his return, he lay to rest before dinner, saying that he was feeling dizzy; and a few minutes thereafter, his life breath left him and he went to where all must go. It is said that the cause of his death was heart disease.

Duke K. Kahanamoku was born in this town on the 21st of July, 1869, and so he made 48 years old on this past 21st of July. The reason Kahanamoku was named “Duke” is because he was born on the day that the Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Honolulu nei, on that very year and day.

Duke K. Kahanamoku, who died, was employed in the police department here in Honolulu nei under William P. Jarrett as a bicycle officer, recorder of offenses, and sergeant, until he became police captain for an entire watch, and for some unknown reason, Kahanamoku left the police force and began to work once more with William P. Jarret at Kawa as a prison guard.

Duke K. Kahanamoku left behind a wife and six sons and three daughters grieving for him on this side of the dark river [muliwai eleele].

From Ke Aloha Aina, we join the family who are saddened for your loved one, but God will lighten all your burdens, for it is He who creates and He who takes away. It is His will that be done, not that of the children of man.

(Aloha Aina, 8/10/1917, p. 1)

HAALELE MAI O DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 32, Aoao 1. Augate 10, 1917.

Duke donating time to make warm clothing, 1918.

In this picture is seen Duke P. Kahanamoku, the swimming champion of Hawaii nei making warm clothing in his spare time on the shore of Waikiki. The young girl watching him is named Miss Kathryn Jackson of Kalakaua Avenue who heard much of Kahanamoku going to make clothes, and she thus wanted to see it for herself.

(Kuokoa, 4/5/1918, p.1)

Ma keia kii e ikeia ana o Duke P. Kahanamoku...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 14, Aoao 1. Aperila 5, 1918.

Duke Kahanamoku in Melbourne, 1915.

MORE IS HEARD OF DUKE KAHANAMOKU.

From the news received in Honolulu, the fastest time seen for the 100 meter goal was broken by Duke P. Kahanamoku, the swimming champ of Hawaii nei, on the 13th of the other month, February.

In the 100 yard race held in Melbourne, Australia, in the afternoon of Saturday, February 13, Duke P. Kahanamoku took the win of that race, G. Cunha was second, and N. Hay of New South Wales was third. His time that he swam for that goal was 56 seconds.

In the 100 meter swim, Duke Kahanamoku and N. Hay reached the goal at the same time, with the win going to neither of them, however, the fastest record held in the history of that distance was made shorter. The time swam by Duke Kahanamoku and his competitor was 1 minute and 1 2/5 seconds.

This time swam by Kahanamoku and Hay for the 100 meter distance is the fastest set in the history of that distance, and the other records were defeated.

(Kuokoa 3/12/1915, p. 3)

LOHE HOU IA O DUKE KAHANAMOKU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 11, Aoao 3. Maraki 12, 1915.

Swim to be held at Punahou, 1922.

A Scene from Preparations for a Swim at Punahou

The picture above [below], beginning from the left is of Duke P. Kahanamoku, the world champion swimmer, Mrs. David Wark Griffith, Oscar Henning, the manager of Kahanamoku, and Dad Center. Mr. Kahanamoku entered into a contract for him to perform some astonishing feats to be made into a movie under the direction of Mr. Henning for the success of that endeavor, and it is believed that a company will be started here to produce Kahanamoku’s movies.

(Kuokoa, 2/10/1922, p. 5)

He Hiona no ka Hoolalaia Ana o Kahi Auau ma Punahou

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 6, Aoao 5. Feberuari 10, 1922.